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8 Common Thinking Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day and How to Prevent Them

8 Common Thinking Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day and How to Prevent Them
12.3K Flares Filament.io 12.3K Flares × Get ready to have your mind blown. I was seriously shocked at some of these mistakes in thinking that I subconsciously make all the time. Obviously, none of them are huge, life-threatening mistakes, but they are really surprising and avoiding them could help us to make more rational, sensible decisions. Especially as we thrive for continues self-improvement at Buffer, if we look at our values, being aware of the mistakes we naturally have in our thinking can make a big difference in avoiding them. Unfortunately, most of these occur subconsciously, so it will also take time and effort to avoid them—if you even want to. Regardless, I think it’s fascinating to learn more about how we think and make decisions every day, so let’s take a look at some of these thinking habits we didn’t know we had. 1. We tend to like people who think like us. This is called confirmation bias. Confirmation bias is a more active form of the same experience. 2. 3. 4. Well, no.

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The Worse-Than-Average Effect: When You're Better Than You Think People underestimate their ability at stereotypically difficult tasks like playing chess, telling jokes, juggling or computer programming. Recently I covered the Dunning-Kruger effect which explains why the incompetent don’t know they’re incompetent. But there’s a flip-side to the Dunning-Kruger: sometimes the competent don’t know when they’re competent. This is the worse-than-average effect. This means that when you’re good at something, you tend to assume that other people are good at it as well. So, when you’re faced with a difficult task that you are good at, you underestimate your own ability. How Sleep Deprivation Decays the Mind and Body - Seth Maxon I awoke in a bed for the first time in days. My joints ached and my eyelids, which had been open for so long, now lay heavy as old hinges above my cheekbones. I wore two pieces of clothing: an assless gown and a plastic bracelet. I remembered the hallway I had been wheeled down, and the doctor’s office where I told the psychiatrist he was the devil, but not this room. I forced myself up and stumbled, grabbing the chair and the bathroom doorknob for balance. I made it to the toilet, then threw water on my face at the sink, staring into the mirror in the little lavatory.

Predicting the unpredictable: critical analysis and practical implications of predictive anticipatory activity 1Department of Psychology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA2Dipartimento di Psicologia Generale, Universita di Padova, Padova, Italy3Department of Statistics, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA4Samueli Institute, Alexandria, VA, USA5Consciousness Research Laboratory, Institute of Noetic Sciences, Petaluma, CA, USA A recent meta-analysis of experiments from seven independent laboratories (n = 26) indicates that the human body can apparently detect randomly delivered stimuli occurring 1–10 s in the future (Mossbridge et al., 2012). The key observation in these studies is that human physiology appears to be able to distinguish between unpredictable dichotomous future stimuli, such as emotional vs. neutral images or sound vs. silence. This phenomenon has been called presentiment (as in “feeling the future”). In this paper we call it predictive anticipatory activity (PAA). Received: 16 January 2014; Accepted: 27 February 2014; Published online: 25 March 2014.

Understanding Brainwaves to Expand our Consciousness The human brain is a complex entity constantly at work, sending electrical signals, communicating, building new neural connections and so on. This electrical activity generated by the brain, also known as brainwaves, reflect our state of mind. Reality is not based on outside influences but is an internal process based on our thoughts, perception and emotions. If we deepen our understanding of these brainwave frequencies, we can control our reality. List of cognitive biases Cognitive biases, categorized. Illustration by John Manoogian III (jm3).[1] Cognitive biases are tendencies to think in certain ways that can lead to systematic deviations from a standard of rationality or good judgment, and are often studied in psychology and behavioral economics.

Brain cancer may grow faster the more you think In a newly published study, medical researchers led by neurologist Michelle Monje at Stanford report than many aggressive forms of brain cancer appear to worsen the more you think. Not just about the cancer, but anything. The more brain activity you have, the faster the cancer cells divide. This discovery has the potential to lead to the creation of new treatments for previously terminal diseases. Monje and her colleagues came to this realization while studying diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), a rare cancer found in children that is untreatable by any current means. The team used a mouse model to investigate the hypothesis that DIPG was hijacking the chemical signals related to myelination, an important part of maintaining the brain and its functionality.

The brain mechanism behind your inner voice Corollary discharge plays a central role in our motor system. It allows us to correct motor errors before we have committed them and it allows us to prevent confusion between self- and externally-caused sensory events. Dr Mark Scott Attribution: How We Explain Behavior In social psychology, attribution is the process of inferring the causes of events or behaviors. In real life, attribution is something we all do every day, usually without any awareness of the underlying processes and biases that lead to our inferences. For example, over the course of a typical day you probably make numerous attributions about your own behavior as well as that of the people around you. When you get a poor grade on a quiz, you might blame the teacher for not adequately explaining the material, completely dismissing the fact that you didn't study.

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