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The Most Important Question Every Assessment Should Answer

The Most Important Question Every Assessment Should Answer
The Question Every Assessment Should Be Able To Answer by Terry Heick The difference between assessment of learning and assessment for learning is a crucial one, in many ways indicative of an important shift in education. Traditionally, tests have told teachers and parents how a student “does,” then offers a very accessible point of data (usually percentage correct and subsequent letter grade) that is reported to parents as a performance indicator. Class data can be gathered to imply instructional effectiveness, and the data from multiple classrooms can be combined to suggest the performance of an entire school, but a core message here is one of measurement and finality: this is how you did. And it’s all past tense. 5 Strategies For Assessment For Learning First, a word about assessment startegies. comenuusaassessment.com created the above graphic that shares 5 strategies for assessment for learning: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. What Every Assessment For Learning Should Tell You Still, it happens. Related:  Assessment

40 Alternative Assessments for Learning When people think of assessment, pencils and bubble sheets may be the first things that come to mind. Assessment does not always have to involve paper and pencil, but can instead be a project, an observation, or a task that shows a student has learned the material. In the end, all we really want to know is that the skill was mastered, right? Why not make it fun and engaging for students as well? Many teachers shy away from alternative assessments because they take extra time and effort to create and to grade. On the other hand, once the assessment guidelines and grading rubric are created, it can be filed away and used year after year. The project card and rubric can be run on card stock (one on each side of the page), laminated, and hole punched with other alternative assessment ideas. Here are 40 alternative assessment ideas to get you started! Alternative Reading Assessments 1. Create a bookmark to match the theme of the last book read. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Alternative Writing Assessments

10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds Good assessment is frequent assessment. Any assessment is designed to provide a snapshot of student understand—the more snapshots, the more complete the full picture of knowledge. On its best day, an assessment will be 100% effective, telling you exactly what a student understands. More commonly, the return will be significantly lower as the wording of questions, the student’s sense of self-efficacy, or other factors diminish their assessment performance. It sounds obvious, but a student is a human being with an entire universe of personal problems, distraction, and related challenges in recalling the information in the form the assessment demands. This makes a strong argument for frequent assessment, as it can be too easy to over-react and “remediate” students who may be banging against the limits of the assessment’s design rather than their own understanding. Simple Assessments The word “simple” here is misleading. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Draw what you do understand. 10.

DERN Personalised learning, reflection, collaboration and .critical thinking are highly valued in education, and classroom practices are changing towards learning as a collaborative activity. Exploration is encouraged and fostered; however, assessment is still following a traditional path – heavily dependent on summative assessment. A short paper, by Phillipa Whiteford, titled The times are a-changing: A New Model for Senior Secondary Assessment explores how a more ‘future-focused’ application of an ePortfolio can provide an innovative solution to the challenges facing current assessment practice in senior secondary education. The author builds a strong argument for the need to align assessment to teaching practices, referencing research on new teaching practices and assessment, and pointing out a need for integrative assessment which combines both assessment for and of learning based on continuous feedback, guidance and reflection (p.66). [1] Fullan, M. & Miles, M. (1992). Research Report:

7 Simple Ways You Can Help Students Pay Attention In A Traditional Classroom - 7 Simple Ways You Can Help Students Pay Attention by TeachThought Staff For many teachers, helping students “pay attention” is probably the wrong way to help improve what you’re probably trying to improve. Listless students. Apathetic responses. Uninspired work. Talking. Texting. Behavior issues. “Off-taskedness.” Daydreaming. These are the hallmarks of a classroom and curriculum in need of some significant rethinking rather than a few “takeaways” to help students “stare longer at work they don’t care about.” That said, for others, the challenge may indeed by one of pure student engagement. Provided in the following infographic from Reading Horizons are some strategies for increasing student engagement. 7 Simple Ways You Can Help Students Pay Attention In A Traditional Classroom 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 7 Simple Ways You Can Help Students Pay Attention In A Traditional Classroom; image attribution readinghorizons.com

Final Exams…a Tradition Worth Exploring I have been having many conversations this year with teachers about our practice of administering final exams for students. Although I cannot confirm with certainty, I recently read that the final exam process has been happening since the 1830s. With all the current research on effective assessment, how students learn and knowing that we are required to make decisions that have a student’s best interest as the primary consideration, I have to question why we are still doing this, this way. I watched a teacher work with a student the other day. At random I chose two well known universities, Harvard and Berkley, and googled their final exam procedures. As for real world application, other than school and my driver license I can’t remember writing a high stakes exam to demonstrate what I know.

7 Tools for Creating Mind Maps and Outlines Online One of the presentations that I made this week was about having students create videos to demonstrate their knowledge of a topic. In that presentation one of the points that I stress is the need for students to create outlines of their videos before moving onto the technical aspects of constructing a video. Here are some tools for creating outlines and mind maps to plan video projects, podcasts, or essays. Quicklyst is a nice tool for taking notes and creating outlines. Knowcase is a free tool for recording ideas and creating outlines. Spider Scribe is an online mind map creation service. Folder Boy is a new service for recording, sharing, and organizing ideas with a team. Wise Mapping is a free collaborative mind mapping tool. Exploratree is a free graphic organizer creation tool. Slatebox is a slick tool for collaboratively creating mind maps and organizational charts.

Life After Levels – An Assessment Revolution?    Over recent months I’ve been involved in interviews for a number of posts across the Multi Academy Trust. One of our favourite questions has been, “What will assessment look like once levels are dead?” The answers have on the whole been a bit confused. This post is based on a webinar I delivered for Optimus Education in March 2015. A Necessary Confusion Teachers and potential leaders are struggling to imagine life after levels, proposing that we keep with levels or that we produce our own levelling systems for Key Stage 2 or 3. Levels were removed in September 2014, with the introduction of the new National Curriculum, and will be reported for the final time in Summer 2015 for Years 2 & 6. New Horizons As the sun sets on the World of Levels, we need to lift our eyes to the horizon and make sure decisions about our new assessment systems are taking us in the right direction. Principle 1 – Assessment Must Support Learning Summative Assessment: Of Learning or For Grading? References Like this:

The Energy Story - Introduction Energy is one of the most fundamental parts of our universe. We use energy to do work. Energy lights our cities. Energy from the sun gives us light during the day. Everything we do is connected to energy in one form or another. Energy is defined as: "the ability to do work." When we eat, our bodies transform the energy stored in the food into energy to do work. Cars, planes, light bulbs, boats and machinery also transform energy into work. Work means moving something, lifting something, warming something, lighting something. There are many sources of energy. The forms of energy we will look at include: Electricity Biomass Energy - energy from plants Geothermal Energy Fossil Fuels - Coal, Oil and Natural Gas Hydro Power and Ocean Energy Nuclear Energy Solar Energy Wind Energy Transportation Energy We will also look at turbines and generators, at what electricity is, how energy is sent to users, and how we can decrease or conserve the energy we use.

Free Resources and Tools for "Authentic" Assessment The key to innovations in assessment and curriculum planning are trust, transparency, and collaboration -- and providing the professional development and training teachers need to succeed. Credit: Tom LeGoff Note: The School of the Future is part of a network of New York schools that develops and uses its own assessment techniques, referred to as DYOs. The school also uses Tasks on Demand, or unannounced assessments that do not provide supports for the students, in order to measure their learning at regular intervals. Resources On This Page: Do Your Own (DYO) Assessment Examples, Rubrics, Data, and Data Analysis Examples of criteria used in authentic assessment Back to Top Skills Spirals and Tracking Sheets Ideas for moving curriculum into a circular pattern and tracking performance to expose students to a wide variety of topics over and over again as the material gets more challenging SOF's Instuctional Tools for Teachers Tools for Developing a High School Humanities Project -- Persepolis

The Photosynthesis Cycle" The Earth's atmosphere is mostly composed of nitrogen. Oxygen makes up just 21 percent of the air we breathe. Carbon dioxide, argon, ozone, water vapor and other gasses make up a tiny portion of it, as little as 1 percent. These gasses probably came from several processes as the Earth evolved and grew as a planet. But some scientists believe that the Earth's atmosphere would never have contained the oxygen we need without plants. Photosynthesis is a complex reaction. 6CO2 + 12H2O + Light -> C6H12O6 + 6O2+ 6H2O In other words, while we inhale oxygen and exhale carbon dioxide, plants inhale carbon dioxide and exhale oxygen. Without the sun to feed plants (and the plants to release oxygen), we might not have breathable air. Obviously, plants are important, but not just because they give us food to eat and oxygen to breathe.

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