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Open Education

Open Education
The aim of this scoreboard is to highlight the huge potential that European institutions have in the world of OER and to help visualize this potential by compiling the existing European-provided MOOCs available on different open websites. European MOOCs are those provided by European institutions, regardless of the platform that hosts them. All of the MOOCs accounted for in the scoreboard are also listed in the MOOC aggregator on this website. Please refer to our FAQ for more information about how this scoreboard is built, what are the sources of information and how the visualization works. Downloads Infographics To download a graphical version of the scoreboard in JPG Format click here. Institutions To download European Open Education Institutions click here Upcoming EU MOOCs To download Upcoming European MOOCs in our database per country and subject click here All EU MOOCs To download ALL European MOOCs in our database per country and subject click here Contact

http://www.openeducationeuropa.eu/en/european_scoreboard_moocs

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The Evolution of Online Learning and Related Tools and Techniques toward MOOCs: Educational IS&T Book Chapter The latest development in the online learning environment, Massive Open Online Courses, dubbed ‘MOOC,' has garnered considerable attention both within and without the academy. This chapter discusses tools and technologies that can support the development of a MOOC, and concludes with commentary about the potential for such a development to continue into mainstream postsecondary education. This chapter delivers a small yet meaningful contribution to the discussion within the book section ‘RIA and education practice of MOOCs,' aligning to the discussion on the topic of ‘educational training design.' Online discussion and presentation tools offer hybrid opportunities to assist course designers to move from a contemporary face to face model toward an online offering. These follow a spectrum moving away from controlled discussion toward larger and larger potential audiences.

What students really think about technology in the classroom By Sarah Garland The grownups who make and debate education policy disagree about a lot of things, but they often take it as a given that kids love technology. And tapping into that love of gadgetry and games is a way to make students “more engaged” in learning, or so many believe. Interviews with students in the middle-income, rural district of Quakertown, on the outskirts of Philadelphia’s suburbs, suggest that kids’ relationship with technology in school is more complicated than the adults may have imagined.

Arizona State, edX to offer freshman year of college online (Poets&Quants) — It’s been four years since Harvard Business School’s Clayton Christensen, the father of disruptive innovation theory, warned that technology would bring large-scale change to higher education. Universities have since been rolling out hundreds of online degree programs and thousands of free MOOCs (massive open online courses). But one of most potentially disruptive initiatives in education launched on Wednesday at Arizona State University and edX, the online learning non-profit founded by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Arizona State will allow students anywhere in the world to take their entire freshman year of courses online and then use the college credit earned to complete undergraduate studies at either its campus or any other university willing to accept those transfer credits. The new offering is sure to raise eyebrows in academia, where change takes place slowly and with great reservation. More from Poets&Quants:

5 MOOC Building Platforms Now that MOOCs are hitting the scene, everyone wants to jump on board! Granted, some want to get into the game in the hopes of making a quick dollar (somehow?), but others genuinely want to know how they can create their own MOOC for educational purposes. Well, you have options! More providers are likely to spring up as we will only cover five potential options. As the entire MOOC industry evolves, expect to see more options at your disposal for this kind of thing.

Yes, the Humanities Are Struggling, but They Will Endure – The Conversation Listen to the dire talk around colleges and universities, read op-eds and magazines, and you might think the humanities were in greater danger than the earth’s climate. In fact, despite the overheated rhetoric, the humanities are not at death’s door. Contemporary pressures will more likely push them into a new shape, even ultimately a healthier one. That claim might seem bizarre. The proportion of college students majoring in the humanities has sunk to an all-time low. Students have turned their backs on art history and literature in favor of studies, like accounting and nursing, that lead directly to jobs.

Open Education The aim of this scoreboard is to highlight the huge potential that European institutions have in the world of OER and to help visualize this potential by compiling the existing European-provided MOOCs available on different open websites. European MOOCs are those provided by European institutions, regardless of the platform that hosts them. All of the MOOCs accounted for in the scoreboard are also listed in the MOOC aggregator on this website. Please refer to our FAQ for more information about how this scoreboard is built, what are the sources of information and how the visualization works. Downloads Changing the Narrative As Phil mentioned, he and I were both lucky to attend the MOOC Research Initiative conference, which was a real tour de force. Jim Groom observed that even the famously curmudgeonly Stephen Downes appeared to be enjoying himself, and I would make a similar observation about the famously curmudgeonly Jonathan Rees. If both of those guys can be simultaneously (relatively) pleased at a MOOC conference, then something is going either spectacularly right or horribly wrong. I believe it was the former in this case. We are at one of those rare moments when there’s enough confusion that real conversation happens and possibilities open up. The sense I got is that everybody is really grappling with the questions of where we can take the concept of a “MOOC” and what MOOCishness might be good for.

Reflections on Learning Design Process Models 1 Over the last month, Rebecca Galley, Paul Mundin and I have been reflecting on a range of our recent meetings and project related activities (including meeting with colleagues from Birmingham City and Gloucestershire, with our external partners, and OU colleagues). This post shares some of this ‘reflection-in-progress’ and as such uses languages familiar to those exploring new structures for curriculum/learning design processes. Here are two different draft representations to help communicate our interpretation of recent work. I think it important that such models seek to weave together the less formal practices and processes (such as design activities) with more formal and necessary demands: If you click on the images an enlarged version should load.

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