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How the Universe Works: Stephen Hawking’s Theory of Everything, Animated in 150 Seconds

How the Universe Works: Stephen Hawking’s Theory of Everything, Animated in 150 Seconds
by Maria Popova A Brief History of Time in no time at all. Legendary theoretical physicist and cosmologist Stephen Hawking is among the greatest scientific minds in human history. In this charming animation for The Guardian’s MadeSimple series, UK-based animation studio Scriberia — who also made the wonderful trailer for Oliver Burkeman’s Antidote — condenses Hawking’s expansive, mind-bending theories down to 150 seconds. Reminiscent in spirit of the RSA animations, though much better-executed creatively, the short video is the visual equivalent of the art of the soundbite. Though undeniably delightful, I can’t help but wonder whether such quick visual syntheses of the life’s work of boundless genius might be our era’s version of the aphorisms that Susan Sontag worried commodify wisdom. Donating = Loving Bringing you (ad-free) Brain Pickings takes hundreds of hours each month. You can also become a one-time patron with a single donation in any amount: Share on Tumblr

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2013/09/25/stephen-hawking-made-simple-animation/

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Looking At Tears Under A Microscope Reveals A Shocking Fact. Share on Facebook One day Rose-Lynn Fisher wondered if her tears of grief would look different compared to her tears of joy, so she began to explore them up close under a microscope. She studied 100 different tears and found that basal tears (the ones that our body produces to lubricate our eyes) are drastically different from the tears that happen when we are chopping onions. The tears that come about from hard laughter aren’t even close to the tears of sorrow. Like a drop of ocean water each tiny tear drop carries a microcosm of human experience.

Why You Should Brush with Sea Salt and Baking Soda - Healthy Holistic LivingHealthy Holistic Living by DANICA COLLINS Whether you’re cued in to the health hazards of commercial toothpastes, or just looking for some bi-weekly TLC to add to your dental discipline, brushing your pearly whites with some sea salt and/or baking soda is a safe and natural way to ensure strong teeth and gums, break down plaque buildup, and protect against bad breath. Either used alone or together, sea salt and baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) are inexpensive, time-tested treatments for tooth care. Let’s Talk Sea Salt Calcium, magnesium, silicon, phosphorus, sodium, nickel, iron—just a few of many trace elements and minerals found in sea salt. These nutrients strengthen gums, protect against tarter and bad breath, and may even whiten your teeth over time.

The Science Of Why You Should Spend Your Money On Experiences, Not Things Most people are in the pursuit of happiness. There are economists who think happiness is the best indicator of the health of a society. We know that money can make you happier, though after your basic needs are met, it doesn't make you that much happier. Videos / What Was The Miller-Urey Experiment? - Stated Clearly Description This animation was sponsored by the Center for Chemical Evolution, NSF, and NASA: The Miller-Urey experiment was the first attempt to scientifically explore ideas about the origin of life. Stanley Miller simulated conditions thought be common on the ancient Earth.

How Many of These 51 Spiritual Awakening Symptoms do YOU Have? 1. Changing sleep patterns: restlessness, hot feet, waking up two or three times a night. Feeling tired after you wake up and sleepy off and on during the day. A bowling ball and feather fall in world's biggest vacuum chamber You probably already know how this one ends, but that doesn't make watching it play out any less spectacular. [optional caption text here] Image: [name here]/Shutterstock The combination of bowling ball and feather is the perfect way to demonstrate air resistance, also known as drag. Meet Dreadnoughtus, The 'Astoundingly Huge' Dinosaur Discovered In Argentina Say hello to Dreadnoughtus schrani, a newly discovered dinosaur that was so formidable, it was named after a battleship that prowled the seas during the early 20th century. "It is by far the best example we have of any of the most giant creatures to ever walk the planet," Dr. Kenneth Lacovara, a paleontologist at Drexel University's College of Arts and Sciences and the scientist who discovered the skeleton, said in a written statement. "With a body the size of a house, the weight of a herd of elephants, and a weaponized tail, Dreadnoughtus would have feared nothing."

The Science of How Memory Works by Maria Popova What the four “slave” systems of the mind have to do with riding a bicycle. “Whatever becomes of [old memories], in the long intervals of consciousness?” Henry James wistfully pondered upon turning fifty. The Science of Sleep: Dreaming, Depression, and How REM Sleep Regulates Negative Emotions by Maria Popova “Memory is never a precise duplicate of the original… it is a continuing act of creation. Dream images are the product of that creation.” For the past half-century, sleep researcher Rosalind D. Cartwright has produced some of the most compelling and influential work in the field, enlisting modern science in revising and expanding the theories of Jung and Freud about the role of sleep and dreams in our lives.

A bowling ball and feather fall in world's biggest vacuum chamber The combination of bowling ball and feather is the perfect way to demonstrate air resistance, also known as drag. Because the shape of the feather allows it to endure way more air resistance than the bowling ball, it takes much longer to fall to the ground. British physicist Brian Cox wanted to see this primary-school problem play out in a vacuum, where there is zero air resistance to mess with the results. Filming for his new BBC 2 show, Human Universe, he travelled to the US and visited the NASA Space Power Facility in Ohio.

The Backfire Effect: The Psychology of Why We Have a Hard Time Changing Our Minds by Maria Popova How the disconnect between information and insight explains our dangerous self-righteousness. “Allow yourself the uncomfortable luxury of changing your mind,” I wrote in reflecting on the 7 most important things I learned in 7 years of Brain Pickings. It’s a conundrum most of us grapple with — on the one hand, the awareness that personal growth means transcending our smaller selves as we reach for a more dimensional, intelligent, and enlightened understanding of the world, and on the other hand, the excruciating growing pains of evolving or completely abandoning our former, more inferior beliefs as we integrate new knowledge and insight into our comprehension of how life works. That discomfort, in fact, can be so intolerable that we often go to great lengths to disguise or deny our changing beliefs by paying less attention to information that contradicts our present convictions and more to that which confirms them.

Energy Commodities Prices Plummet in Late 2014 During the last four months of 2014, crude oil and petroleum product prices fell dramatically, and ended the year with the largest price drops of all major commodities in the S&P Goldman Sachs Commodity Index (GSCI), according to the US Energy Information Administration, based on Bloomberg. In 2014, the energy component of the GSCI fell 43 percent from the start of the year. Two benchmark crude oils, West Texas Intermediate (WTI) and Brent, make up about 67 percent of the weighting in the S&P GSCI energy index. Petroleum-based products (gasoline, heating oil, and gasoil) together comprise another 29 percent of the S&P GSCI energy index, and because prices for these products generally follow crude oil prices, the index tends to follow the major price movements in the crude oil market. At the end of June, with elevated risk for supply disruptions in Iraq, the S&P GSCI energy index rose to its highest point of the year, reaching 10 percent above starting levels. Advertisement

The Miracle of 528 Hz Solfeggio & Fibonacci Numbers Solfeggio tones create music to calm an overactive mindand send us towards connecting with the divine.According to Dr. Leonard Horowitz, 528 Hertz is a frequency that is central to the “musical mathematical matrix of creation.” More than any sound previously discovered, the “LOVE frequency” resonates at the heart of everything. It connects your heart, your spiritual essence, to the spiraling reality of heaven and earth. The Love frequency is the “Miracle” note of theoriginal Solfeggio musical scale. First LSD Study in 40 Years Finds Therapeutic Potential The first LSD study in 40 years finds therapeutic potential. Scientific study often opens new doors of discovery—but sometimes it reopens doors closed long ago. On Tuesday, experimental psychiatrists in Santa Cruz, California published results from the first controlled medical trial of LSD in over 40 years. The study, published in Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease [pdf], found evidence that LSD, when administered in a medically-based therapeutic environment, lowers the anxiety experienced by individuals facing life-threatening illnesses. Although the sample size—just 12 people—was small, the findings offer compelling rationale for further study of the illegal, often stigmatized drug. “This study is historic and marks a rebirth of investigation into LSD-assisted psychotherapy,” said Rick Doblin in a news release, executive director of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, which sponsored the study.

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