background preloader

The Incredibly True Adventures of a School Librarian

The Incredibly True Adventures of a School Librarian

http://www.nikkidrobertson.com/

Related:  BLOGS & WIKISladyluckmelissa

Top School Library Blogs One look at the titles of blogs narrated by school librarians reveals the evolution of a profession within an institution that is at a pivotal point. Charged with the vital duty of promoting digital literacy, today’s librarians are daring, unquiet, sassy and definitely e-literate. This list features the top school library blogs ordered by website popularity metrics and social media engagement including the number of websites that link to a blog and number of followers on Twitter. We commend these school librarians for taking the time to share their ideas, experiences, and advice with the school library community. Top 100 Education Blogs for Educators and Teachers - Education Blog Top 100 Education blogs The Best Education blogs from thousands of top Education blogs in our index using search and social metrics. Data will be refreshed once a week. If your blog is selected in this list, you have the honour of displaying this Badge (Award) on your blog. Submit Your Blog

referenceandinformationresources / Plagiarism Resources Tutorials: Two brief videos from ABC News (one focuses on the videos available on YouTube that "teach" cheating): From Connect with Kids: Teacher-Librarians Here's a MEGALIST for my fellow media specialists/teacher-librarians. It's taken a while to gather all the information and I will continue to add to this page. Currently there are close to 185 sites listed. There is SO MUCH information out there! Please feel free to add your suggestions! School Library Connection Blog In today’s age of social media and instantaneous communication, the world seems smaller than ever before. With so many people across so many diverse countries, cultures, and backgrounds in contact with one another—and often part of our school communities—it is important to acknowledge and promote a global perspective among young learners. This is particularly relevant for libraries, where diverse characters and stories can offer readers windows into the lives of characters very different from themselves. Below is a list of titles recommended by SLC reviewers that focus on characters from various backgrounds and walks of life, all experiencing problems, joys, fantasies, and ordeals that readers from anywhere in the world can recognize and relate to. Subscribers can always find reviews of other great titles like this at reVIEWS+ Save Me a Seat Author: Sarah Weeks & Gita Varadarajan Price: $16.99 Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.

How Can You Use Audio in the Classroom? There are many ways to use recorded books in the classroom, but here are some of the most popular tried-and-true methods for engaging your readers with audiobooks. On this site, you’ll find four sample audio excerpts, each accompanied by a teacher-tested lesson plan and reproducible to build and reinforce reading skills. Audiobooks support literature study and motivate kids to enjoy literature, and they help develop reading skills such as comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary. Recorded books can be used anytime by ESL students or others who struggle with print text, or who need help accessing the book in order to keep up with the class. Using audio lets them take personal control of their study and repeat material as often as they like.

AudioSynced In conjunction with Abby (the) Librarian, STACKED hosts a monthly meme to celebrate all things audiobook. On the first of each month, we rotate the blogger round up of audiobook news, reviews, and more shared in the blogosphere in the last month. We host on odd-numbered months. To participate, share a link to your audiobook reviews, news, or features from the previous month (so, for June 1st, share anything posted between May 1 and June 1). ON LIBRARIES: Hilda K. Weisburg I decided to take my own advice and make time for fun (yes, that’s a professinal resolution. Read on to see that one) – and more time for me. My blog for this week is a repeat of the one I did for January 2, 2017. #FRIT7234 For busy teachers, there are limited opportunities within the school day to be observed, to observe other teachers, to pause and reflect on the details of specific classroom moments, and to receive support from colleagues. Since in-person observations may be difficult to arrange, teachers may find themselves going it alone when trying out new learning, refining practice, or facing challenges in their classroom -- at times without much feedback or support. A robust new video observation toolkit from Harvard helps address these challenges by suggesting ways of using video technology to rethink traditional approaches to teacher observation and professional development. Downloads from the toolkit include a variety of resources to help school leaders, teachers, teacher leaders, instructional coaches, and personal learning networks prepare for, launch, and evaluate the success of video observations in school communities. Tools Snapshot

Technology An amazing way to get your tweens and teens to know the “unfamiliar” bits of your library is to do self-directed scavenger hunts. You know that your “kids” tend to congregate to one particular area- whether it’s your teen space, a place with the most comfortable chairs or a low table for card gaming, or the place furthest away from the supervising eyes of the non-teen people at the desk. And while they’ll know where to find the YA books, MAD Magazine and Alternative Press, and manga, do they know where to find non-fiction books for reports? Or how to operate one of the databases? If you become devious and take a little time out of your day, you can take a theme and turn a lesson in the library world into a creative self-directed program that will make them want to participate. Scavenger hunts can be as intricate or as simple as you want them to be.

The Digital Shift — On Libraries and New Media, powered by Library Journal and School Library Journal 5 Tips for Makers on a Budget from a Teen Librarian By The Digital Shift on August 4, 2017 “Teen Librarian Toolbox” blogger and SLJTeen Live! panelist Karen Jensen shares some ideas and resources for low-budget maker spaces. The Chatty Librarians: Podcasting | Field Reports #FRIT7234 Happy Sunday, friends! Today I wanted to quickly stop by to share one of my favorite notepads and a simple, no frills way to keep track of which students have received a positive note. Since opening 4 years ago, our school has used PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports) as a school-wide system for setting expectations and managing behavior.

Library_Data Skip to main content Create interactive lessons using any digital content including wikis with our free sister product TES Teach. Get it on the web or iPad! guest Join | Help | Sign In

Nikki blogs about the happenings in her library. The blog is updated on a regular basis and spans a wide variety of library and technology topics. by crussell77 Jun 10

Related: