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Insulated Earthbag Foundations for Yurts

Insulated Earthbag Foundations for Yurts
Note: If you’re new to earthbag building, first read the introductory Step-by-Step Earthbag Building and How to Build an Earthbag Roundhouse . This Instructable includes complete step-by-step instructions on how to make an insulated earthbag foundation. You can use the same process to make insulated foundations for any type of structure – straw bale, earthbag, cordwood, etc. Yurts or gers are very efficient and practical in harsh, cold climates, as evidenced by centuries of use in Mongolia. Many people build their yurts on a raised wooden platform to reduce moisture problems. In addition to the many other uses for earthbags (retaining walls, domes, rootcellars, houses, etc.), you can build insulated foundations by filling the bags with insulation such as scoria. For those who live in Canada or similar climates, you might want to follow the Earth-Sheltered Solar Canadian blog , who’s planning to build an insulated earthbag foundation that’s suitable for extremely cold climates. Related:  Earthbag BuildingYurtscob

One Natural Builder's Next Big Adventure Called: The Fossil Fuel-Free House Morgan Caraway is a natural builder, homesteader, intentional community co-founder and author. In 2009 his wife, Mary Jane, and he moved on to a piece of undeveloped land in the Blue Ridge Mountains and began a homesteading adventure. Theye built a yurt, earthbag house and a cordwood bath house. Since then they have joined a small, private intentional community and have helped build a pole barn and an earthbag house using earthship principles. Please help them in this IndieGoGo campaign. Our first earthbag house. In our 7 years of living off-grid, we've learned a lot and we will put all of this knowledge and more into our most ambitious project yet - a fossil fuel-free house that uses passive solar design, thermal mass and hydronics (heated floors) to stay comfortable year-round without burning ANY fossil-fuels. Over a lifetime, conventionally built modern houses use an extreme amount of energy to heat and cool them.

Build A Portable Home - A Mongolian Yurt Yurt/Gher Construction 101 A guide to Building Yurts...or more specifically, how I built mine! Based on Knowledge Gained from "Doing it Myself", and reading about it on-line. I've now built three yurts, for myself and friends, and we go camping in Luxury in these a few times a year. If you like the outdoors, but you hate having to crawl around in pokey little tents then this one's for you! We sleep two of us in luxury in this tent, in a full queen-sized bed! We have dedicated hanging space for our clothes so they don't crumple or anything, and lockable boxes for our belongings (or a lock on the door works too!) When we invite other camping-inclined friends over for a party in our tent, we can confortably fit 15-20 people in, sitting around on cushions and lounging on the bed and on the rugs on the floor... now that's what I can a party tent! If you like pictures, please be sure to have a look at step 9 - it's got over 50 assembly photos on that step alone !

Step-by-Step Earthbag Building This Instructable explains each main step of construction for building vertical earthbag walls. Videos on my Earthbag Natural Building YouTube channel demonstrate the process. For those who don’t know, earthbag building uses polypropylene rice bags or feed bags filled with soil or insulation that are stacked like masonry and tamped flat. Barbed wire between courses keeps bags from slipping and adds tensile strength. The final plastered walls look just like adobe structures. I got involved with earthbag building when the Indian Ocean tsunami hit Southeast Asia in December, 2004. Our websites at EarthbagBuilding.com and Earthbag Building Blog explain just about everything you need to know for free. The following instructions assume you have cleared and leveled the site, removed topsoil, positioned fill soil around the building site to minimize work, dug a trench to stable subsoil, put about 12” of gravel in the trench, and added corner guides and stringlines.

An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000 Looking for a very stable design which does not only come cheap from the start but also makes you save money in the long run. Due to its shape and materials used, the earthbag house has less area than your normal home, so it’s cheaper to keep it supplied with energy. Don’t be scared if you never built circular structures before, because the example shown here used a technique called the compass arm which you can easily learn. Starting on the rubble trench foundation. Covering over our sediment fabric with pea gravel. Two rows of stem wall – 80 lb sack concrete. 2 strands of barbed wire go between every row. Firewood used to hold the barbed wire in place. Door frame up. A strip anchor to hold the door in place. Mary Jane and Morgan on right The little window near the camera will also be a cold storage in the winter. Cal-Earth, Earthbag, Earthbag Building, Natural Building, Round House, Superadobe

Pacific Yurts Time-Lapse Setup Introduction The purpose of this non-commercial site is to network with those who are interested in earthbag building and spark a dialogue about earthbag house designs. This innovative building method is exploding in popularity and there is enormous potential to provide affordable homes for all of humanity, all without damaging our environment. This site is about unique small house plans, small home plans, floor plans, custom plans, architecture, small house designs, building green eco-friendly homes, sustainable building, blueprints for affordable homes — all built with earthbags. All styles are included: country, cottage, bungalow, traditional, modern (contemporary), mountain, beach, cabins and other popular styles. So here is what I am thinking. Enviro Earthbag Dome If you’d like to jump right in and start browsing house plans, click on Categories in the menu on the right. Here’s a brief overview of my designs. Earthbag cottage To browse house plans, click on Categories in the menu on the right.

Earthbag Construction EarthBag Homes - you're standing on the building materials... earthbag home Long sandbags are filled on-site and arranged in layers or as compressed coils. Stabilizers such as cement, lime, or sodium carbonate may be added to an ideal mix of 70% sand, 30% clay. earthbag home Plastic bags recycled into plastic bags -- if plastic does not break down for a thousand years, this building is sure to last several lifetimes. earthbag construction Foundations differ as per site. earthbag construction The time consuming part, filling the bags. earthbag construction Testing the strength of an arch. earthbag home Project Seres, Guatemala. projectseres.org, flickr.com earthbag home CalEarth -- Emergency Shelter Village, Hesperia, California. earthbag home Cal Earth -- Emergency Shelters. earthbag home CalEarth let the layers show. CalEarth -- this might not be totally earthbag, but like the fish face. earthbag home CalEarth photo by Mike Smith flickr.com CalEarth Vault under construction. Resources:

Yurt Living in Upstate New York I discovered Louis Johnson’s yurt on facebook and contacted him and he agreed to let me share some of his photos of his home. Louis will tell you a little bit about living in a yurt in upstate New York. Their yurt is built by the Colorado Yurt Company. This winter has proved to be a cold one as well, but we had a better handle on our wood harvesting this year and are in good shape. We estimate that we will use between 3 and 4 cord this year… only one more really cold month to go. Our PV system is small and has a generator plug in to supplement power when needed. This past year we have made a couple of low tec improvements to the yurt. This year we are going to try to tackle a passive solar hot water heater and maybe a solar oven. We continue to have the time of our lives living the way we do, and hope that others will realize the joy that comes with living a smaller, simpler way of life. Our loft design was inspired by pictures we saw online. Notice the heat shield behind the wood stove.

An Earthbag Round House For Less Than $5,000 Looking for a very stable design which does not only come cheap from the start but also makes you save money in the long run. Due to its shape and materials used, the earthbag house has less area than your normal home, so it’s cheaper to keep it supplied with energy. Don’t be scared if you never built circular structures before, because the example shown here used a technique called the compass arm which you can easily learn. Recycled or salvaged materials were used wherever it was possible, like in the door or on the floor. The tutorial has photos showcasing almost each step of the building process so if you decide to replicate the project, use it to help and guide you along the way. Starting on the rubble trench foundation. Covering over our sediment fabric with pea gravel. Two rows of stem wall – 80 lb sack concrete. 2 strands of barbed wire go between every row. Firewood used to hold the barbed wire in place. Door frame up. A strip anchor to hold the door in place.

Dream Green Homes: Earthbag Plans Cozy, Affordable Home: Yurt In 1996, I bought 10 acres in Saranac Lake, N.Y. At the time, I was living in Pennsylvania, but I had visited small town New York several years before while visiting Paul Smith Forestry College, and I had always wanted to return. Following the death of my father and getting divorced, it seemed a good time to start on my dream. Until I was able to move to Saranac Lake permanently, I worked many hours at a utility company and spent my vacations camping on the land with my two kids. Getting Started In 2009, when the company I was working for scaled down, I accepted a good severance package and decided to cash out and move to my land. I laid out plans for the deck and base for my yurt. To grade part of the property and pull out some tree stumps, I rented a track hoe. That July, I laid out my lines for the yurt and started digging post holes. The Community Chips In After I figured out how to stabilize the first post, I continued digging away a little each day. Learning Along the Way

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