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Elizabeth Loftus: The fiction of memory

Elizabeth Loftus: The fiction of memory

http://www.ted.com/talks/elizabeth_loftus_the_fiction_of_memory.html

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Avatar Ten avatars of Vishnu (Matsya, Kurma, Varaha, Vamana, Krishna, Kalki, Buddha, Parshurama, Rama & Narasimha). Painting from Jaipur, now at the Victoria and Albert Museum In Hinduism, an avatar /ˈævətɑr/ (Hindustani: [əʋˈt̪aːr], from Sanskrit अवतार avatāra "descent") is a deliberate descent of a deity to Earth, or a descent of the Supreme Being (e.g., Vishnu for Vaishnavites), and is mostly translated into English as "incarnation", but more accurately as "appearance" or "manifestation".[1][2] The term is most often associated with Vishnu, though it has also come to be associated with other deities.[5] Varying lists of avatars of Vishnu appear in Hindu scriptures, including the ten Dashavatara of the Garuda Purana and the twenty-two avatars in the Bhagavata Purana, though the latter adds that the incarnations of Vishnu are innumerable.[6] The avatars of Vishnu are a primary component of Vaishnavism. An early reference to avatar, and to avatar doctrine, is in the Bhagavad Gita.[7]

Why We're Sometimes Kind Without Reason - Charles Montgomery Our brains are constantly, subtly being primed in fascinating ways by our physical surroundings. The eminent sociologist Erving Goffman suggested that life is a series of performances, in which we are all continually managing the impression we give other people. If this is so, then public spaces function like a stage in the same way that our own homes and living rooms do. Architecture, landscaping, the dimensions of the stage, and the other actors around us all offer cues about how we should perform and how we should treat one another. A man might urinate in a graffiti-covered alleyway, but he would not dream of doing so in the manicured mews outside an old folks’ home. He would be more likely to offer a kindness in an environment where he felt he was among family or friends, or being watched, than in some greasy back alley.

You Need To See This 17-Minute Film Set Entirely On A Teen's Computer Screen These words are probably unfurling inside one of many open tabs on your computer screen. Perhaps one tab is for work, one is for chatting, and another is for Twitter. You probably even have some others open for no particular reason. This is the way we receive information and the way we communicate now: constantly, simultaneously, compulsively, endlessly, and more and more often, solitarily. Scientific Proof That We Are Becoming Literal Gods What if I told you that in 1000 years, we will look like petty cavemen in our current physical and mental state compared to future humans? There is an overwhelming amount of scientific evidence that proves that not only are our physical bodies evolving at an accelerated rate, our consciousness is as well. We are indeed in the evolutionary fast lane, and perhaps we are witnessing the prophecies of apotheosis in action. Our consciousness and bodies are evolving at a rate never seen before in the history of the earth We can look around the world and see the signs of dramatic spiritual evolution as we continue to actualize our fullest potential. There is an awakening happening right now, and December 21st 2012 really did mark the dawn of a new age of enlightenment.

The Science of Why We Don't Believe Science Illustration: Jonathon Rosen "A MAN WITH A CONVICTION is a hard man to change. Tell him you disagree and he turns away. 5 Future Technology Myths" The flying car has been prophesied for decades. It's one of the holy grails of the futuristic, utopian society, where everyone gets to zip around through the air and land easily, quietly and safely wherever he or she wants. You've probably seen videos of flying-car prototypes, taking off from the ground, hovering and possibly crashing. But the first "autoplane" was actually unveiled in 1917, and many similar efforts have followed. Henry Ford predicted the flying car was coming -- in 1940 -- and there have been numerous false alarms ever since. A decade into the 21st century, we don't seem to be any closer, despite what you might read on gadget blogs.

Soon, computers will become more intelligent than us. Then what? It's been a trope in science fiction for years: someday, the computers will become self-aware and take over. But in 1993, the computer scientist and science fiction author Vernor Vinge wrote an academic paper in which he predicted that we were only a few decades away from what he termed "The Singularity" — the point at which scientists create computers with "greater than human intelligence." In science fiction, this usually turns out badly for the human race. Inevitably, the computers, like HAL in 2001: A Space Odyssey, decide they don't need the humans. The Science of Why We Don't Believe Science Climategate had a substantial impact on public opinion, according to Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication. It contributed to an overall drop in public concern about climate change and a significant loss of trust in scientists. But—as we should expect by now—these declines were concentrated among particular groups of Americans: Republicans, conservatives, and those with "individualistic" values. Liberals and those with "egalitarian" values didn't lose much trust in climate science or scientists at all. "In some ways, Climategate was like a Rorschach test," Leiserowitz says, "with different groups interpreting ambiguous facts in very different ways." Is there a case study of science denial that largely occupies the political left?

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