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Monsanto

Monsanto
Founded in 1901 by John Francis Queeny, by the 1940s Monsanto was a major producer of plastics, including polystyrene and synthetic fibers. Notable achievements by Monsanto and its scientists as a chemical company included breakthrough research on catalytic asymmetric hydrogenation and being the first company to mass-produce light emitting diodes (LEDs). The company also formerly manufactured controversial products such as the insecticide DDT, PCBs, Agent Orange, and recombinant bovine somatotropin (a.k.a. bovine growth hormone). Monsanto was among the first to genetically modify a plant cell, along with three academic teams, which was announced in 1983,[9] and was among the first to conduct field trials of genetically modified crops, which it did in 1987. It remained one of the top 10 U.S. chemical companies until it divested most of its chemical businesses between 1997 and 2002, through a process of mergers and spin-offs that focused the company on biotechnology. History[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monsanto

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Genetically modified food Genetically modified foods (or GM foods) are foods produced from organisms that have had specific changes introduced into their DNA using the methods of genetic engineering. These techniques have allowed for the introduction of new crop traits as well as a far greater control over a food's genetic structure than previously afforded by methods such as selective breeding and mutation breeding.[1] Commercial sale of genetically modified foods began in 1994, when Calgene first marketed its Flavr Savr delayed ripening tomato.[2] To date, most genetic modification of foods have primarily focused on cash crops in high demand by farmers such as soybean, corn, canola, and cotton seed oil. These have been engineered for resistance to pathogens and herbicides and better nutrient profiles.

Dow Chemical Company The Dow Chemical Co., commonly referred to as Dow, is an American multinational chemical corporation headquartered in Midland, Michigan, United States. As of 2007, it is the second-largest chemical manufacturer in the world by revenue (after BASF)[2] and as of February 2009, the third-largest chemical company in the world by market capitalization (after BASF and DuPont). Dow manufactures plastics, chemicals, and agricultural products.

Paul Otlet Paul Marie Ghislain Otlet (/ɒtˈleɪ/; French: [ɔtle]; 23 August 1868 – 10 December 1944) was a Belgian author, entrepreneur, visionary, lawyer and peace activist; he is one of several people who have been considered the father of information science, a field he called "documentation". Otlet created the Universal Decimal Classification, one of the most prominent examples of faceted classification. Otlet was responsible for the widespread adoption in Europe of the standard American 3x5 inch index card used until recently in most library catalogs around the world (by now largely displaced by the advent of the online public access catalog (OPAC)). Otlet wrote numerous essays on how to collect and organize the world's knowledge, culminating in two books, the Traité de Documentation (1934) and Monde: Essai d'universalisme (1935).[1][2] Early life and career[edit]

Susan Blumenthal, M.D.: A Roadmap for Achieving an AIDS-Free Generation By Susan Blumenthal, M.D., and Melissa Shive Tomorrow on World AIDS Day, President Obama will speak about beginning to end the AIDS epidemic in America and worldwide. Last month, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced the U.S. government's commitment to achieving an HIV-free generation by building upon the accomplishments of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and the significant successes that U.S. and international investments in science and services have already achieved in the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS. Organic Consumers Association: News and Background Info on Monsanto President Obama knows that agribusiness cannot be trusted with the regulatory powers of government. On the campaign trail in 2007, he promised: We'll tell ConAgra that it's not the Department of Agribusiness. It's the Department of Agriculture. We're going to put the people's interests ahead of the special interests. But, starting with his choice for USDA Secretary, the pro-biotech former governor of Iowa, Tom Vilsack, President Obama has let Monsanto, Dupont and the other pesticide and genetic engineering companies know they'll have plenty of friends and supporters within his administration.

Water fluoridation controversy The water fluoridation controversy arises from political, moral, ethical,[1] and safety concerns regarding the fluoridation of public water supplies. The controversy occurs mainly in English-speaking countries, as Continental Europe has ceased water fluoridation.[2] Those opposed argue that water fluoridation may cause serious health problems, is not effective enough to justify the costs, and has a dosage that cannot be precisely controlled.[3][4][5] In some countries, fluoride is added to table salt.[6] At the dosage recommended for water fluoridation, the only known adverse effect is dental fluorosis, which can alter the appearance of children's teeth during tooth development.[7] Dental fluorosis is cosmetic and unlikely to represent any other effect on public health.[8] Despite opponents' concerns, water fluoridation has been effective at reducing cavities in both children and adults.[7] Ethics Safety Efficacy

RAND Corporation RAND has approximately 1,700 employees and three principal American locations: Santa Monica, California (headquarters); Arlington, Virginia; and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The RAND Gulf States Policy Institute has offices in New Orleans, Louisiana, and Jackson, Mississippi.[7] RAND Europe is located in Cambridge, United Kingdom, and Brussels, Belgium.[8] The RAND-Qatar Policy Institute[9] is in Doha, Qatar. RAND's newest office is in Boston, Massachusetts. RAND is home to the Frederick S. Tulip mania A tulip, known as "the Viceroy", displayed in a 1637 Dutch catalog. Its bulb cost between 3,000 and 4,150 guilders (florins) depending on size. A skilled craftsman at the time earned about 300 guilders a year.[1] Anonymous (group) Anonymous (used as a mass noun) is a loosely associated international network of activist and hacktivist entities. A website nominally associated with the group describes it as "an internet gathering" with "a very loose and decentralized command structure that operates on ideas rather than directives". The group became known for a series of well-publicized publicity stunts and distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks on government, religious, and corporate websites. Anonymous originated in 2003 on the imageboard 4chan, representing the concept of many online and offline community users simultaneously existing as an anarchic, digitized global brain.[3][4] Anonymous members (known as "Anons") can be distinguished in public by the wearing of stylised Guy Fawkes masks.[5] In its early form, the concept was adopted by a decentralized online community acting anonymously in a coordinated manner, usually toward a loosely self-agreed goal, and primarily focused on entertainment, or "lulz".

Monsanto's Deep Roots In Washington It's planting season, which brings to mind one of the most ubiquitous names in agribusiness: Monsanto. Love it or hate it -- and there are plenty of people on either side -- the company controls much of the agricultural market, and also sells products for the suburban yard such as the weed-killer Roundup. Roundup is the core of Monsanto's agricultural breakthrough: The company produces genetically modified seeds that are resistant to the herbicide, making it easy for farmers to spray whole fields of soy or corn and kill only the weeds. Food production made easy. On the flip side, environmentalists and organic food fans maintain there are too many unknowns and potential dangers involved with genetic modification.

Cancer Cancer The causes of cancer are diverse, complex, and only partially understood. Many things are known to increase the risk of cancer, including tobacco use, dietary factors, certain infections, exposure to radiation, lack of physical activity, obesity, and environmental pollutants.[2] These factors can directly damage genes or combine with existing genetic faults within cells to cause cancerous mutations.[3] Approximately 5–10% of cancers can be traced directly to inherited genetic defects.[4] Many cancers could be prevented by not smoking, eating more vegetables, fruits and whole grains, eating less meat and refined carbohydrates, maintaining a healthy weight, exercising, minimizing sunlight exposure, and being vaccinated against some infectious diseases.[2][5] Cancer can be detected in a number of ways, including the presence of certain signs and symptoms, screening tests, or medical imaging.

Agent Blue Agent Blue affects plants by causing them to dry out. As rice is highly dependent on water to live, using Agent Blue on these paddies can destroy an entire field and leave it unsuitable for further planting. This is why Agent Blue was also used where food was not a factor, but foliage was. Haijin The Haijin (Chinese: 海禁; pinyin: Hǎi Jìn; literally "sea ban") order was a ban on maritime activities imposed during China's Ming Dynasty and again at the time of the Qing Dynasty. Intended to curb piracy, the ban proved ineffective for that purpose. Instead it imposed huge hardships on coastal communities and legitimate sea traders.[citation needed] Ming policy[edit] 2010–2011 Greek protests The 2010–12 Greek protests were a series of demonstrations and general strikes taking place across Greece. The protests, which began on 5 May 2010, were sparked by plans to cut public spending and raise taxes as austerity measures in exchange for a €110 billion bail-out, aimed at solving the 2010–2011 Greek debt crisis. Three people were killed in the protests of 5 May, one of the largest in Greece since 1973. On 25 May 2011 (2011-05-25), anti-austerity protestors organised by the Direct Democracy Now!

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