background preloader

The Thirty Greatest Mathematicians

The Thirty Greatest Mathematicians
Click for a discussion of certain omissions. Please send me e-mail if you believe there's a major flaw in my rankings (or an error in any of the biographies). Obviously the relative ranks of, say Fibonacci and Ramanujan, will never satisfy everyone since the reasons for their "greatness" are different. I'm sure I've overlooked great mathematicians who obviously belong on this list. Please e-mail and tell me! Following are the top mathematicians in chronological (birth-year) order. Earliest mathematicians Little is known of the earliest mathematics, but the famous Ishango Bone from Early Stone-Age Africa has tally marks suggesting arithmetic. Early Vedic mathematicians The greatest mathematics before the Golden Age of Greece was in India's early Vedic (Hindu) civilization. Top Thales of Miletus (ca 624 - 546 BC) Greek domain Apastambha (ca 630-560 BC) India Pythagoras of Samos (ca 578-505 BC) Greek domain Panini (of Shalatula) (ca 520-460 BC) Gandhara (India) Tiberius(?)

http://fabpedigree.com/james/mathmen.htm

Related:  mellow_marshmallow7amullyamatematica

Duality From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Duality may refer to: Mathematics[edit] Philosophy, logic, and psychology[edit] Wonders of Math - The Game of Life What is the Game of Life? by Paul Callahan Rules of the Game of Life Life is played on a grid of square cells--like a chess board but extending infinitely in every direction. A cell can be live or dead. A live cell is shown by putting a marker on its square. Leonhard Euler A statement attributed to Pierre-Simon Laplace expresses Euler's influence on mathematics: "Read Euler, read Euler, he is the master of us all."[6][7] Life[edit] Early years[edit] Hypatia Hypatia (/haɪˈpeɪʃə/ hy-PAY-shə; Ancient Greek: Ὑπατία; Hypatía) (born c. AD 350 – 370; died 415[2]) was a Greek Alexandrine Neoplatonist philosopher in Egypt who was one of the earliest mothers of mathematics.[3] As head of the Platonist school at Alexandria, she also taught philosophy and astronomy.[4][5][6][7] As a Neoplatonist philosopher, she belonged to the mathematic tradition of the Academy of Athens, as represented by Eudoxus of Cnidus;[8] she was of the intellectual school of the 3rd century thinker Plotinus, which encouraged logic and mathematical study in place of empirical enquiry and strongly encouraged law in place of nature.[3]

If You’re Bad At Math, It’s Because You Didn’t Learn These Simple Tricks If you ever tried to split a bill with friends at dinner, you probably realized they’re sort of lacking in math skills. Sure, the blame is somewhat on those of us who are still so mathematically inept for not paying attention in class as much as we should have. However, it would have been a lot easier to stay awake in class if what we were taught was as easy to remember as the tricks below. Even if only one of these tips make sense to you, you’re bound to feel like some sort of a math genius. I know I do. 1.

Theorem Many mathematical theorems are conditional statements. In this case, the proof deduces the conclusion from the hypotheses. In light of the interpretation of proof as justification of truth, the conclusion is often viewed as a necessary consequence of the hypotheses, namely, that the conclusion is true in case the hypotheses are true, without any further assumptions. roots Typesetting math: 8% John Baez December 15, 2011 Around 2006, my friend Dan Christensen created a fascinating picture of all the roots of all polynomials of degree ≤ 5 with integer coefficients ranging from -4 to 4: Click on the picture for bigger view.

Carl Friedrich Gauss Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss (/ɡaʊs/; German: Gauß, pronounced [ɡaʊs]; Latin: Carolus Fridericus Gauss) (30 April 1777 – 23 February 1855) was a German mathematician who contributed significantly to many fields, including number theory, algebra, statistics, analysis, differential geometry, geodesy, geophysics, mechanics, electrostatics, astronomy, matrix theory, and optics. Sometimes referred to as the Princeps mathematicorum[1] (Latin, "the Prince of Mathematicians" or "the foremost of mathematicians") and "greatest mathematician since antiquity," Gauss had an exceptional influence in many fields of mathematics and science and is ranked as one of history's most influential mathematicians.[2] Early years[edit] Gauss was a child prodigy. There are many anecdotes about his precocity while a toddler, and he made his first ground-breaking mathematical discoveries while still a teenager. The year 1796 was most productive for both Gauss and number theory.

Related:  MathematiciansMathematics 3Maths ResourcesPythagorasMATHTRICKSMaths