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Scalable Vector Graphics

Scalable Vector Graphics
Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) is an XML-based vector image format for two-dimensional graphics with support for interactivity and animation. The SVG specification is an open standard developed by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) since 1999. SVG images and their behaviors are defined in XML text files. Overview[edit] This image illustrates the difference between bitmap and vector images. SVG has been in development since 1999 by a group of companies within the W3C after the competing standards Precision Graphics Markup Language (PGML, developed from Adobe's PostScript) and Vector Markup Language (VML, developed from Microsoft's RTF) were submitted to W3C in 1998. Since 2001, the SVG specification has been updated to version 1.1. Work is currently in progress on SVG 2, which incorporates several new features in addition to those of SVG 1.1 and SVG Tiny 1.2. Printing[edit] Scripting and animation[edit] SVG drawings can be dynamic and interactive. Compression[edit] Development history[edit] Related:  wikipedia.org and pagesAJAX

List of United States Navy ratings From left to right: a Special Warfare Operator 1st Class and a Boatswain's Mate 2nd Class. Ratings should not be confused with rates, which describe the Navy's enlisted pay-grades and ratings. Enlisted sailors are referred to by their rating and pay-grade. History[edit] After more than 200 years of evolution, today’s Navy enlisted rating structure still plays a key role in career development, serves as a basis for training, detailing, advancement, and simply keeping tabs on several hundred thousand Navy Personnel. Rating structure[edit] Rear Admiral Terry McCreary presenting a rating insignia of a Mass Communication Specialist First Class (MC1). The pay grades E-4 (Petty Officer Third Class) through E-9 (Master Chief Petty Officer) fall within the rating structure. The word "rate" is used in two ways within the structure. Aviation[edit] Notes[edit] Construction ratings[edit] Notes[edit] Medical[edit] Administration, deck, technical, and weapons specialty ratings[edit] Notes[edit] Notes[edit]

ECMAScript History[edit] JavaScript was originally developed by Brendan Eich of Netscape under the name Mocha, later LiveScript, and finally renamed to JavaScript.[1] In December 1995, Sun Microsystems and Netscape announced JavaScript in a press release.[2] In March 1996, Netscape Navigator 2.0 was released, featuring support for JavaScript. Owing to the widespread success of JavaScript as a client-side scripting language for web pages, Microsoft developed a compatible dialect of the language, naming it JScript to avoid trademark issues. JScript added new date methods to fix the non-Y2K-friendly methods in JavaScript, which were based on the Java Date class.[3] JScript was included in Internet Explorer 3.0, released in August 1996. Netscape delivered JavaScript to Ecma International for standardization and the work on the specification, ECMA-262, began in November 1996.[4] The first edition of ECMA-262 was adopted by the Ecma General Assembly of June 1997. Versions[edit] Features[edit] Syntax[edit]

WebKit WebKit is available under a BSD-form license[11] with the exception of the WebCore and JavaScriptCore components, which are available under the GNU Lesser General Public License. As of March 7, 2013, WebKit is a trademark of Apple, registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.[12] Origins[edit] According to Apple, some changes involved OS X-specific features (e.g., Objective-C, KWQ,[15] OS X calls) that are absent in KDE's KHTML, which called for different development tactics.[16] Split development[edit] The exchange of code between WebCore and KHTML became increasingly difficult as the code base diverged because both projects had different approaches in coding and code sharing.[17] At one point KHTML developers said they were unlikely to accept Apple's changes and claimed the relationship between the two groups was a "bitter failure".[18] Apple submitted their changes in large patches containing very many changes with inadequate documentation, often to do with future additions.

Category:Summer holidays Modern and ancient holidays considered culturally integral to the Summer season.For local festivals see the list of local Summer festivals. Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. Pages in category "Summer holidays" The following 27 pages are in this category, out of 27 total. HTML 5 <article> Tag The HTML <article> tag is used to represent an article. More specifically, the content within the <article> tag is independent from the other content on the site (even though it could be related). By "independent" I mean that its contents could stand alone, for example in syndication. Examples of article content could include a forum post, a newspaper article, a blog entry, or a user-submitted comment. The <article> tag was introduced in HTML 5. Demo Attributes HTML tags can contain one or more attributes. There are 3 kinds of attributes that you can add to your HTML tags: Element-specific, global, and event handler content attributes. The attributes that you can add to this tag are listed below. Element-Specific Attributes The following table shows the attributes that are specific to this tag/element. Global Attributes The following attributes are standard across all HTML 5 tags. For a full explanation of these attributes, see HTML 5 global attributes. Event Handler Content Attributes

Comparison of layout engines (Scalable Vector Graphics) The following tables compare SVG compatibility and support for a number of layout engines. Please see the individual products' articles for further information. Unless otherwise specified in footnotes, comparisons are based on the stable versions without any add-ons, extensions or external programs. Explanation of the tables[edit] Engine nomenclature[edit] Rather than the names of web browsers, the names of the underlying engines are used. Values[edit] Values indicate the level of support in the most recent version of the layout engine, or (if a version number is given) in the specified version. This table shows support status of different ways of embedding SVG into HTML, for different layout engines. Comparison of various Scalable Vector Graphics element support.

Category:Spring holidays Subcategories This category has the following 5 subcategories, out of 5 total. Pages in category "Spring holidays" The following 26 pages are in this category, out of 26 total. This list may not reflect recent changes (learn more). HTML5 Tutorial HTML5 is the latest and most enhanced version of HTML.Technically, HTML is not a programming language, but rather a mark up language. This tutorial has been designed for beginners in HTML5 providing the basic to advanced concepts of the subject. Before starting this tutorial you should be aware of the basic understanding of HTML and its tags You do not need to have your own environment to start learning HTML5 programming! We have set up an on-line compiler for you that can be used to compile and execute the programs on-line. For most of the examples available in this tutorial, you will find a Try it option at the top right corner of the code box. <!

Gecko (layout engine) Gecko is a web browser engine used in many applications developed by Mozilla Foundation and the Mozilla Corporation (notably the Firefox web browser including its mobile version and their e-mail client Thunderbird), as well as in many other open source software projects. Gecko is free and open-source software subject to the terms of the Mozilla Public License version 2. It is designed to support open Internet standards, and is used by different applications to display web pages and, in some cases, an application's user interface itself (by rendering XUL). Gecko offers a rich programming API that makes it suitable for a wide variety of roles in Internet-enabled applications, such as web browsers, content presentation, and client/server.[6] Development of the layout engine now known as Gecko began at Netscape in 1997, following the company's purchase of DigitalStyle. As Gecko development continued, other applications and embedders began to make use of it.

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