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My portfolio | NAPP Portfolio 12 Beginner Tutorials for Getting Started With Photoshop This series is supported by Ben & Jerry's Joe, Ben & Jerry's new line-up of Fair Trade and frozen iced coffee drinks. Learn more about it here. Adobe Photoshop, the ubiquitous and industry standard graphics software for photographers, designers, digital artists, as well as casual enthusiasts, can be a baffling application to understand the first time you fire it up. Luckily, littered across the vast space of the web are tutorials in all shapes and sizes that will help you get up and running in no time. In this post, I've pieced together 12 excellent Photoshop tutorials geared toward beginners. Because this is specifically for beginners — and because Photoshop's robust set of features is near-bottomless — I've skipped intermediate and advanced topics such as drawing with the Pen tool and working with 3D effects. If you have tips for aspiring Photoshoppers, share them in the comments below. 1. 2. 3. The most important concept you should understand about Photoshop is its layering system. 4.

Resize Images online View all the Image Tutorials Pixels and dpi - what does it mean? Every digital image is made up from Pixels. A pixel is the smallest picture element containing information that makes up all digital images. Understanding at least the basics on what a pixel is will help you better understand exactly what size you need to make your photo for a particular purpose - but more on that later. A pixel is the building block of a digital image and typically a photo contains pixels that are made up from 24-bit pixels. When it comes to viewing a photo on your computer screen you are also viewing pixels. We don't always want to display photos on a computer screen and often want to print them out. For more in-depth technical details read more about pixels in the Wikipedia When you need to resize more than 1 photo at a time we use and recommend BatchPhoto.

Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider Blog » Photoshop & Digital Photography Techniques, Tutorials, Books, Reviews & More Free Photoshop Actions for Photographers - ADDICTED TO DESIGN - Lomo action, Polaroid action, Infrared action, Night Vision action, CS4, CS3 Vanishing point in Photoshop CC | Learn Photoshop CC Share this Episode Autoplay End of Video Show End Screen Default Quality Adjust your embed size below, then copy and paste the embed code above. Community Translation Your transcript request has been submitted. Adobe TV does its best to accommodate transcript requests. Join the Community Translation Project Thanks for your interest in translating this episode! Please Confirm Your Interest Thanks for your interest in adding translations to this episode! An error occurred while processing your request. Another translator has already started to translate this episode. Thanks for Participating! This episode has been assigned to you and you can expect an e-mail shortly containing all the information you need to get started. About This Episode Learn to use the Vanishing Point tool in Photoshop CC. Produced By Presented By

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom tutorials by Julieanne Kost DeHaze in Photoshop CC 2015 and Lightroom CC In this short tip, Julieanne demonstrates how the new Dehaze control in Lightroom CC and Phtooshop CC 2015 can help dramatically improve an image by removing haze or, add artistic atmosphere by adding haze. What's New in Lightroom CC: Hidden Gems Discover new features and enhancements Lightroom CC including faster performance, improved local adjustment tools, HTML 5 compatible web galleries, and more! Quick Tip: Panorama Merge Learn how easy it is to stitch together multiple files into a panorama that has all of the editing flexibility of a raw file. Photoshop Daily A Complete Beginner’s Guide to Masking in Photoshop What Is a Mask? Layers are probably the single most important addition to Photoshop since the original version, but layer masks are a close second. I would posit that until you thoroughly understand how and why to use masks, you simply don’t understand the power of Photoshop. The term “mask” isn’t immediately understandable to someone outside the realm of graphic design. There are two primary types of masks: clipping masks and layer masks. Layer Masks A layer mask is something that you apply to a given layer to control the transparency of that layer. When you add a mask to a layer, it covers the entire thing with an invisible grayscale canvas. On this invisible canvas, you can paint white, black or any level of gray in-between. With this in mind, try to imagine what the mask below would do to a layer: As you can see, if our mask was all white with the three circles shown above, we would have a completely visible layer where in all the white areas, and spots of transparency in the circles.

The Russell Brown Show - Advanced Masking with Photoshop CS5 Share this Episode Autoplay End of Video Show End Screen Default Quality Adjust your embed size below, then copy and paste the embed code above. Community Translation Your transcript request has been submitted. Adobe TV does its best to accommodate transcript requests. Join the Community Translation Project Thanks for your interest in translating this episode! Please Confirm Your Interest Thanks for your interest in adding translations to this episode! An error occurred while processing your request. Another translator has already started to translate this episode. Thanks for Participating! This episode has been assigned to you and you can expect an e-mail shortly containing all the information you need to get started. About This Episode In this episode, Russell Brown demonstrates advanced masking techniques in Photoshop CS5 that will help you get great results from seemingly impossible images. Presented By Runtime : 00:12:31 Added : 06/10/2010 About this show The Russell Brown Show

10 Free Web-based Alternatives to Photoshop I’m fed up with Photoshop and its one billion rarely-used features. How about a simple photo-editor that’s quick, easy, and doesn’t cost a thousand dollars. Fortunately, there’re tons of web-based photos editors popping up. Most are crap, but some are promising. Check out these free web-based Photoshop alternatives: Arguably, Picnik is the most popular web-based photo editor. Very polished interface. Part of the Aviary suite of creative apps, Phoenix also offers layers and compositing. Adobe was a little late to the web-apps game, but this is a pretty good first try. Nice, simple, and clear interface, with no ads at all. flautR offers a cornucopia of image tools, boasting thousands of photo effects. Another ad-free editor. Hmm… looks like Pixenate was “inspired” by Pic Resize. Another simple interface. An example of how ugly these apps can get. Let me know if I’ve missed any other good ones. If you liked this post, please bookmark it on del.icio.us.

Products | Photoshop Adobe Photoshop Create powerful images with the professional standard. To view this content, you need the latest version of the Flash Player. Adobe TV uses the Open Source Media Framework (OSMF) to deliver a superior video experience. Please upgrade your Flash Player to version 10.2 to benefit from this technology. Gain unprecedented creative control with new expressive features and visual performance improvements in Adobe Flash Player 10.2. Flash Player is a cross-platform browser plug-in that delivers breakthrough Web experiences to over 99% of Internet users. Featured Episode Perspective Warp Show: Learn Photoshop CC Senior Digital Imaging Evangelist, Photoshop & Lightroom Worldwide Creative Suite Design Evangelist Senior Creative Director at Adobe Principal Worldwide Evangelist, Video & Audio Tools Worldwide Design Evangelist Featured Created over a year ago [x] Episodes Linked Smart Objects Using Smart Objects in your images is a great way to work non-destructively. Perspective Warp Recent Episodes

The Complete Picture with Julieanne Kost - Enhancing Light Community Translation Episode available in 0 languages Available Translations: Join the Community Translation Project Thanks for your interest in translating this episode! Please Confirm Your Interest Thanks for your interest in adding translations to this episode! An error occurred while processing your request. Another translator has already started to translate this episode. Thanks for Participating! This episode has been assigned to you and you can expect an e-mail shortly containing all the information you need to get started. About This Episode In this Episode of the Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates what you can do in Lightroom’s Develop module to enhance your photographs using color and tonality to change the mood and atmosphere of an image . Presented By

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