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Find, Read, & Cite Journal Articles

Find, Read, & Cite Journal Articles
Other useful links: Basics Tutorial (w/audio), APA Style 6th Ed. Annotated Sample Paper, APA Style 6th Ed. (PDF) Summary Guidelines for Unbiased Language, APA Style 6th Ed. (PDF) Language Use for Gender,APA Style 6th Ed. (PDF) Language Use for Sexual Orientation,APA Style 6th Ed. (PDF) Purchase your own APA Publication Manual Writing Empirical Papers: Beginners Writing Empirical Papers: Advanced (PDF) - for use by students who have learned the basics about empirical papers. Finding articles: Searching PSYCHINFO Access the PSYCHINFO (and full-text PsycArticles if available) database through your library's web site (e.g., Trexler Library). (1) Limit your search to English language only articles (unless you read another language). (2) Students in Introductory psychology courses may want to limit your search to only the types of documents your professor is allowing for the assignment. (6) After conducting any given search, you will get a list of article titles. Finding. Finding.

http://www.muhlenberg.edu/depts/psychology/findreadcite.htm

Related:  Avoiding Plagiarism

Avoiding Plagiarism Summary: There are few intellectual offenses more serious than plagiarism in academic and professional contexts. This resource offers advice on how to avoid plagiarism in your work. Contributors:Karl Stolley, Allen Brizee, Joshua M. Citing Yourself If you cite or quote your previous work, treat yourself as the author and your own previous course work as an unpublished paper, as shown in the APA publication manual. For example, if Marie Briggs wanted to cite a paper she wrote at Walden in 2012, her in-text citation might look like this: Briggs (2012) asserted that previous literature on the psychology of tightrope walkers was faulty in that it "presumed that risk-taking behaviors align neatly with certain personality traits or disorders" (p. 4). And in the reference list: Briggs, M. (2012). An analysis of personality theory.

Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing It's Here: A new look for the Purdue OWL! The new version of the Purdue OWL is available at Worry not! Our navigation menu and content will remain largely the same. In 11 days, we will be discontinuing owl.english.purdue.edu and you will be automatically redirected to the new site. Summary: This handout is intended to help you become more comfortable with the uses of and distinctions among quotations, paraphrases, and summaries. APA Formatting and Style Guide Note: This page reflects the latest version of the APA Publication Manual (i.e., APA 7), which released in October 2019. The equivalent resource for the older APA 6 style can be found here. Reference citations in text are covered on pages 261-268 of the Publication Manual. What follows are some general guidelines for referring to the works of others in your essay. Note: On pages 117-118, the Publication Manual suggests that authors of research papers should use the past tense or present perfect tense for signal phrases that occur in the literature review and procedure descriptions (for example, Jones (1998) found or Jones (1998) has found...).

Home - Citing Your Sources - Research Guides at Southern New Hampshire University - Shapiro Library What exactly is plagiarism? Let's go to a source! As defined by Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed. to plagiarize is: DIY 3D scanner Cool. Splinescan used to have something like that as well, sans flash. I'm not sure about the technical details, but ?javascript? tracked the mouse and the image rotated. You can't make this stuff up: Plagiarism guideline paper retracted for...plagiarism This could be an April Fools’ joke. But it isn’t. In what can only be described as an ironic twist, the Indian Journal of Dermatology is retracting a paper that presents guidelines on plagiarism for…wait for it…

The Future Of Storytelling Is About To Get Wild Guest author Kim Gaskins is the director of content development and lead writer for Latitude, an international research consultancy. Many of us go about our lives constantly surrounded by screens, immersed in various "stories": movies, TV shows, books, plot-driven video games, news articles, advertising, and more. Whether we realize it or not, we're creating new behaviors, routines, mindsets, and expectations around what we watch, read or play—which in turn presents new challenges and opportunities for creators and marketers. In other words, while the fundamentals of good storytelling remain the same, technology is changing how stories can be told. But what does that mean exactly? Since last year, Latitude, a strategic insights consultancy, has been conducting an ongoing Future of Storytelling initiative to understand what audiences want for the long haul.

How to Cite Something You Found on a Website in APA Style by Chelsea Lee Perhaps the most common question we get about APA Style is “How do I cite a website?” or “How do I cite something I found on a website?” English 50 Exercises for Story Writers English 50 – Intro to Creative Writing: Exercises for Story Writers Basic Theory: What is a short story? Columbia says historian's acclaimed book on North Korea was plagiarized; publisher says it's been taken out of print Charles Armstrong, Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Studies in the Social Sciences at Columbia University, plagiarized parts of his award-winning book on North Korea, Tyranny of the Weak: North Korea and the World, 1950-1992. He’s currently on sabbatical and will retire at the end of 2020, the university told Armstrong’s colleagues this week. “These findings were made in accordance with our policy, which required a confidential preliminary review by an inquiry committee, an investigation by a separate ad hoc faculty committee, oversight and recommendations by the university’s standing Committee on the Conduct of Research, and final decisions by the executive vice president for research and the provost,” Maya Tolstoy, dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, wrote in an email to professors that was obtained by Inside Higher Ed.

JCS, Journal of Consciousness Studies Critical Reviews The complete text from which these are extracted is available. See also Editorial: The Future of Consciousness Studies How to Write a Summary How To Writing a good summary demonstrates that you clearly understand a text...and that you can communicate that understanding to your readers. A summary can be tricky to write at first because it’s tempting to include too much or too little information. But by following our easy 8-step method, you will be able to summarize texts quickly and successfully for any class or subject. 1) Divide…and conquer. First off, skim the text you are going to summarize and divide it into sections.

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