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The Magic of Doing One Thing at a Time - Tony Schwartz

The Magic of Doing One Thing at a Time - Tony Schwartz
by Tony Schwartz | 8:53 AM March 14, 2012 Why is it that between 25% and 50% of people report feeling overwhelmed or burned out at work? It’s not just the number of hours we’re working, but also the fact that we spend too many continuous hours juggling too many things at the same time. What we’ve lost, above all, are stopping points, finish lines and boundaries. Technology has blurred them beyond recognition. Wherever we go, our work follows us, on our digital devices, ever insistent and intrusive. Tell the truth: Do you answer email during conference calls (and sometimes even during calls with one other person)? The biggest cost — assuming you don’t crash — is to your productivity. But most insidiously, it’s because if you’re always doing something, you’re relentlessly burning down your available reservoir of energy over the course of every day, so you have less available with every passing hour. I know this from my own experience. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3.

http://blogs.hbr.org/2012/03/the-magic-of-doing-one-thing-a/

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7 Google Calendar Planning Tips Google Calendar is my choice for organizing my schedule. I don’t like Microsoft Outlook, but only because I loathe client-side applications for non-creativity-based processes. Here are 7 ways to use Google Calendar to better schedule your life, with a really cool add-on idea to boot. Multi-Tasking and it’s Effect on Concentration, Intelligence, and Reasoning Recently there was an experiment conducted that studied two sets of people. One consisted of individuals who multi-tasked constantly, while the other group rarely engaged in multi-tasking. Both groups were comprised strictly of students attending Stanford University, so it can be assumed that all are of above average intelligence. In order to compare their methods of concentration and managing information, both groups took part in a number of cognitive exercises. When some type of interference surfaced during the test, the individuals who multi-tasked frequently had difficulty maintaining concentration.

Monotasking Is The New Multitasking We all know multitasking is inefficient. A classic 2007 study of Microsoft workers found that when they responded to email or instant messaging alerts, it took them, on average, nearly 10 minutes to deal with their inboxes or messages, and another 10-15 minutes to really get back into their original tasks. That means that a mere three distractions per hour can preclude you from getting anything else done. Time Management Tips - Time Management Tips for ADHD Time Management Tips and Adult ADD I’m running late. I’ll be there in just a little while. I am so sorry that I am late. How many times have you said these words? It feels terrible to be late -– to work, to your doctor's appointment, to your meeting, to meet a friend, getting the kids to school, and even worse, picking the kids up from school.

Wine Blog » Blog Archive » Marketing 101 ~ When You Get a Gold Medal, What to Do With It This question came up at the UC Davis PR Extension class: PR for Small Wineries, where Jose, Steve Heimoff, and Bart Hansen (Dane Cellars) and I were presenters for Rusty Eddy’s annual class on wine PR. This is a constant question that’s asked by winery owners, once the gold medal has been achieved (and I get a lot of communications to tell me about winning an award). My first answer is always, “Let’s just make sure that you don’t ask me to write a press release and go tell every writer you and I know.” Why? Writers are looking for news; a gold, silver, or bronze (kissed-on-the-lips-by-your-sister) medal isn’t news, in the correct sense of the word. There are tons of wine competitions, some more credible than others, some more relevant to a region (Sonoma County Harvest Fair, for instance, impacts wines sales in Sonoma County), there are some where the panel of judges are just sommeliers, etc.

Rock Your Google Calendar in 18 Ways — Online Collaboration Google Calendar doesn’t get much love or attention these days. Some users are wondering if Google’s forgotten about it. Still, it’s a pretty cool web app, especially if you learn the ins and outs and use it collaboratively with colleagues, friends, or family. If you’ve been using it since it was introduced last year, you may know how to do many of these things. Maybe you even have your own tips and tricks for making it really rock. The Myth of Multitasking Christine Rosen In one of the many letters he wrote to his son in the 1740s, Lord Chesterfield offered the following advice: “There is time enough for everything in the course of the day, if you do but one thing at once, but there is not time enough in the year, if you will do two things at a time.” To Chesterfield, singular focus was not merely a practical way to structure one’s time; it was a mark of intelligence. “This steady and undissipated attention to one object, is a sure mark of a superior genius; as hurry, bustle, and agitation, are the never-failing symptoms of a weak and frivolous mind.” In modern times, hurry, bustle, and agitation have become a regular way of life for many people — so much so that we have embraced a word to describe our efforts to respond to the many pressing demands on our time: multitasking.

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How to Write an Online Press Release Today’s web-driven world makes it possible for companies large and small to create news simply by writing and publishing their own newsworthy content. The way to get started is by writing and sharing powerful press releases online. Thanks to the power of today’s social web, the elitism of public relations is gone. Nowadays, many organizations do their own PR. How to Commit to a Goal Psychological experiments demonstrate the power of a simple technique for committing to goals. Here’s a brief story about why we all sometimes get distracted from the most important goals in our lives. Perhaps you recognise it? You are thinking about changing your job because your boss is a pain and you’re stagnating. As the weeks pass you think about how good it would feel to work for an organisation that really valued you. You think this might be a good goal to commit to but…

Multi-taskers are Bad At It People who multitask all the time may be the worst at doing two things at once, new research suggests. The findings, based on performances and self-evaluations by about 275 undergraduate students, suggest many people multitask not out of a desire to boost productivity, but because they are easily distracted and can't focus on one activity. And those people turn out to be the worst at juggling different things, the researchers said. "From a public safety perspective, it's a little alarming that the people who report using a cellphone while driving the most are the persons who are the worst at multitasking," said study co-author David Sanbonmatsu, a psychologist at the University of Utah. The findings were published today (Jan. 23) in the journal PLoS One. Distracted lives

Use Index Cards to Accelerate Important Projects January 18th, 2015 · 18 comments The Difficulty of Deep Projects For the sake of discussion, let’s define a deep project to be a pursuit that leverages your expertise to generate a large amount of new value. These projects require deep work to complete, are rarely urgent and often self-initiated (e.g., no one is demanding their immediate completion), and have the potential to significantly transform or advance your professional life. Examples of deep projects include writing a highly original book, creating an irresistible piece of software, or introducing a new academic theory.

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