background preloader

Strategies for Teaching Reading Comprehension

Strategies for Teaching Reading Comprehension
Comprehension of Fiction video by The Jerry L. Johns Literacy Clinic at Northern Illinois University Upon completion of this section, you will: Understand the components of reading comprehension Receive ideas for making the text personally relevant Learn how to teach active engagement with the text Obtain extension activities for all learning styles Traditionally, reading comprehension was narrowly thought to encompass answering some multiple-choice questions after reading a story or reading passage. While this may be one form of reading comprehension, it is not comprehensive and does not take into account the stages of reading comprehension, requirements for understanding different genres of text, or understanding text when read silent versus orally. Paula, an eighth grade student with dyslexia, cannot manage to answer multiple choice questions unless they are read aloud to her. We have written this so that you can share the information directly with your students. Before You Read Preview

http://dyslexiahelp.umich.edu/professionals/dyslexia-school/reading-comprehension

Related:  Resources for Specific Learning Disability (SLD) dislexia, disgrmaestrafrancyReading Problems210 EDUC

Classroom Strategies: Creating a Reading Culture for Struggling Readers Then I stumbled upon a simple observation that gave me an idea—and lots of hope. It all started when I hired a colleague of mine, Meg, to work with my dyslexic son on his writing the summer before he entered high school. Like any good writing teacher, his summer tutor understood the intimate connection between reading and writing. Meg arrived at our home loaded down by bags of books and full of lots of questions.

Teaching Students with Dyslexia and Dysgraphia: Lessons from Teaching and Science Teaching Students with Dyslexia and Dysgraphia: Lessons from Teaching and Science Authors Virginia Berninger Ph.D., Beverly Wolf M.Ed. Availablity Usually ships in 24 hours Publisher : Brookes Publishing Lesson Plans and Resources for Arts Integration Tips for downloading: PDF files can be viewed on a wide variety of platforms -- both as a browser plug-in or a stand-alone application -- with Adobe's free Acrobat Reader program. Click here to download the latest version of Adobe Reader. Lesson Plans Sample arts-integration presentations, lesson plans, quizzes, and other documents from various teachers and classes at Bates Middle School. Back to Top Teach the Seven Strategies of Highly Effective Readers By: Elaine K. McEwan To improve students' reading comprehension, teachers should introduce the seven cognitive strategies of effective readers: activating, inferring, monitoring-clarifying, questioning, searching-selecting, summarizing, and visualizing-organizing. This article includes definitions of the seven strategies and a lesson-plan template for teaching each one. To assume that one can simply have students memorize and routinely execute a set of strategies is to misconceive the nature of strategic processing or executive control. Such rote applications of these procedures represents, in essence, a true oxymoron-non-strategic strategic processing.— Alexander and Murphy (1998, p. 33)

Dyscalculia: Number games Brian Butterworth hopes that his number games will help dyscalculic children — and open a window on how the brain processes numbers. In the mid-1980s, Paul Moorcraft, then a war correspondent, journeyed with a film crew into Afghanistan to produce a documentary about the fifth anniversary of the Soviet invasion. The trip took them behind Soviet lines. “We were attacked every fucking day by the Russians,” says the colourful Welshman. But the real trouble started later, when Moorcraft tried to tally his expenses, such as horses and local garb for his crew.

Teacher Recommended: 50 Favorite Classroom Apps Educators and students are quickly becoming more comfortable with classroom technology, allowing them to shift from thinking about the technical side of integrating a new tool to focusing on how it improves learning. While the sheer number of education apps is still overwhelming, increasingly teachers have found what works for them and are sticking to them. “The conversations I had were radically different than they were a year ago,” said Michelle Luhtala, the librarian for New Canaan High School and host of an Emerging Tech webinar on edWeb. She tapped her professional learning network of educators, teaching all grades and located all over the country, to share their favorite tech tools. “A year ago people felt like it was this new thing that was so overwhelming,” Luhtala said, “and now it really seems much more comfortable.”

What Is Dyslexia? As with other learning disabilities, dyslexia is a lifelong challenge that people are born with. This language processing disorder can hinder reading, writing, spelling and sometimes even speaking. Dyslexia is not a sign of poor intelligence or laziness. It is also not the result of impaired vision. Children and adults with dyslexia simply have a neurological disorder that causes their brains to process and interpret information differently. Formative assessment with hexagons Formative assessment is something I’ve been putting a lot more emphasis on over the past few years. I’m so sick of just relying of end-of-topic exams to gauge what students have learnt. I want my students to continuously question how they are going and make changes to their learning accordingly. This is one of the reasons that my faculty has embarked on a Structured Observed Learning Outcomes (SOLO) journey this year. One of the ways that many teachers using SOLO use to assess student learning is with SOLO hexagons. SOLO hexagons involves the major concepts or ideas from a topic to be placed individually onto hexagons.

Teaching Strategies for Reading: Professional Development Resource Highlights SummerSummer is here! While most of your students will be on break from school for a few months, you can still engage their minds this summer. Try our summer reading suggestions, math and science worksheets, and cross-curricular resource packets to prepare kids for what the next school year will bring! June Calendar of Events June is full of events that you can incorporate into your standard curriculum. Helping dyslexic children within the classroom. © 2000, Patricia Hodge Dip.spld(dyslexia) Proficient reading is an essential tool for learning a large part of the subject matter taught at school. With an ever increasing emphasis on education and literacy, more and more children and adults are needing help in learning to read, spell, express their thoughts on paper and acquire adequate use of grammar. A dyslexic child who finds the acquisition of these literacy skills difficult can also suffer a lot of anguish and trauma when they may feel mentally abused by their peers within the school environment, because they have a learning difficulty. Much can be done to alleviate this by integrating the child into the class environment (which is predominantly a learning environment) where he/she can feel comfortable and develop confidence and self esteem. Class teachers may be particularly confused by the student whose consistent underachievement seems due to what may look like carelessness or lack of effort.

Top 90 Educational Android Apps for Teachers August 24, 2015 After having posted about the best Chrome extensions and Chromebook apps for teachers, here is another back-to school goodie for teachers using or planning to integrate Android-operated tablets in their instruction. This is basically a compilation of some very good educational Android apps we have reviewed in different posts in the course of last year. We have arranged these apps under multiple categories so you can easily browse through and find what you want. 1- Android Apps for Notetaking 2- Android Portfolio Apps3- Android Presentation Apps4- Android Reference Apps5- Android Video Editing Apps6- Android Apps for Creating Screencasts7- Android Digital Storytelling Apps 8- Android Apps for Creating Concept Maps9- Android Apps for Teaching Kids Coding10- Android Apps for Augmented Reality11- Android Apps for Recording Audio12- Android Apps for Flipped Classroom13- Android Apps for Creating Comic Strips14- Android Apps for Reading and Literacy

This Man Invented a Font to Help People With Dyslexia Read A new typeface is making life easier for people everywhere who live with dyslexia. Christian Boer, 33, is a Dutch graphic designer who created the font that makes reading easier for people, like himself, who have dyslexia, according to his website. Now, he’s offering it to people for free. The typeface is called “Dyslexie,” and Boer first developed it as a final thesis project when he was a student at the Utrecht Art Academy in the Netherlands. The font makes reading easier for people with dyslexia by varying the letter shapes more, making it harder to confuse similarly shaped letters like “b” and “d,” for example.

MIT Teaching and Learning Laboratory What Are Intended Learning Outcomes? It may be best to start with what intended learning outcomes aren’t. They aren’t simply a list of the topics to be covered in the course. Certainly, there will be a body of knowledge that students should know and understand by the time the course is complete. But if the goals for what students should achieve stops there, there may be many missed opportunities for providing them with a more productive learning experience. An intended learning outcome should describe what students should know or be able to do at the end of the course that they couldn’t do before.

Students struggling with math may have a neurocognitive disorder called dyscalculia: Disorder affects roughly as many people as dyslexia Students who struggle to learn mathematics may have a neurocognitive disorder that inhibits the acquisition of basic numerical and arithmetic concepts, according to a new paper. Specialised teaching for individuals with dyscalculia, the mathematical equivalent of dyslexia, should be made widely available in mainstream education, according to a review of current research published in the journal Science. Although just as common as dyslexia, with an estimated prevalence of up to 7% of the population, dyscalculia has been neglected as a disorder of cognitive development. However, a world-wide effort by scientists and educators has established the essential neural network that supports arithmetic, and revealed abnormalities in this network in the brains of dyscalulic learners.

Related: