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Best Sites for Primary Documents in World History

Best Sites for Primary Documents in World History
Common Core offers an incentive for teachers to use historic documents to build literacy skills in a content area while empowering students to be the historian in the classroom. But document-based (DBQ) instruction in this context requires four key elements to be successful: The right documents. Knowing how to look at them. Letting students discover their own patterns, then asking students to describe, compare and defend what they found. Basing the task on enduring questions, the kind that students might actually want to answer. I've assigned my pre-service social studies methods class the task of designing some DBQs and I assembled a list of some of my favorite sources for finding historic documents in World History. All these sites feature good search engines and the ability to download documents for use in classroom projects. Musicians and an acrobat, Smithfield Decretals (Brit. Title: Weighing Cotton, Bombay Creator: Johnson, William; Henderson, William Date: ca. 1855-1862

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Reading Like A Historian The Reading Like a Historian curriculum engages students in historical inquiry. Each lesson revolves around a central historical question and features sets of primary documents designed for groups of students with diverse reading skills and abilities. This curriculum teaches students how to investigate historical questions by employing reading strategies such as sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating, and close reading. Instead of memorizing historical facts, students evaluate the trustworthiness of multiple perspectives on historical issues.

Lesson Plans: The Great War in Global Context • Skip Navigation • Skip to main content Lesson Plans: The Great War in Global Context Psychology and Alchemy Psychology and Alchemy is Volume 12 in The Collected Works of C. G. Jung, a series of books published by Princeton University Press in the U.S. and Routledge & Kegan Paul in the U.K. It is study of the analogies between alchemy, Christian dogma, and psychological symbolism.[1] Teachers Easy Guide on How to Evaluate Web content for Classroom Inclusion As our students grow dependant on Internet being a primary source for their information, it becomes of urgent necessity that we, as teachers and educators, should know how to evaluate web content and decipher credible resources from spam and irrelevant ones. Regrettably enough, some of the teachers who are using technology in their instruction still don't come to grips with the mechanisms used to sift through internet content. There is a crude analogy to this situation . A teacher who does not evaluate the web content he shares with his students is like a person driving a car without having a driver license, he can still drive his car but he does not know the real dangers he is putting himself to in doing so. Update : This article is available for download in a Slideshare presentation below

Global Connections . Religion The Islamic tradition recognizes many of the Jewish and Christian prophets, including Abraham, Moses, and Jesus (although he is not considered to be the son of God). Many non-Muslims mistakenly believe that Muhammad is the equivalent of Jesus in the Islamic tradition; in fact, it is the Quran that stands in the same central position in Islam as Jesus does in Christianity. Muhammad himself is not divine, but a prophet chosen by God to deliver his message and an example of piety to emulate. Jews and Christians are specifically protected in the Quran as Peoples of the Book, reinforcing their spiritual connection to Islam by virtue of having been given revelations from God. The Islamic legal tradition has upheld the rights of Jews and Christians to maintain their beliefs and practices within their communities in Islamic lands, and this policy of tolerance has generally been upheld. Back to top

15 Best Google Drive Add-Ons for Education Google Drive has enabled Google Add Ons and there are some that you and your students will want to enable right away. Others may appeal more to professional developers or those who work remotely . I have updated this post and also held a free webinar talking about my favorite Google Drive Add Ons. I’ve updated this post originally written in 2014 to reflect current information. This remains one of my most popular posts to date, so I want it to be current and to remove links that no longer work. Gettysburg Address (1863) Perhaps the most famous battle of the Civil War took place at Gettysburg, PA, July 1 to July 3, 1863. At the end of the battle, the Union's Army of the Potomac had successfully repelled the second invasion of the North by the Confederacy's Army of Northern Virginia. Several months later, President Lincoln went to Gettysburg to speak at the dedication of the cemetery for the Union war dead. Speaking of a "new birth of freedom," he delivered one of the most memorable speeches in U.S. history. At the end of the Battle of Gettysburg, more than 51,000 Confederate and Union soldiers were wounded, missing, or dead. Many of those who died were laid in makeshift graves along the battlefield.

Haunting photos of World War I reveal how little Europe has changed in 100 years The numbers reveal the horror of the Great War: Sixty-five million soldiers fought. Nine million killed in combat. Nearly 20 million wounded. 2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, the conflict that reshaped Europe, redefined international power structures, introduced the U.S. as a global superpower and fundamentally changed the role government played in people’s everyday lives. Photographer Peter Macdiarmid collected modern photos from around Europe and overlaid World War I-era images, giving a sense of how much–and how little–has changed since the War to end all Wars. The town hall and belfry of Arras, France is seen from the main square in this archive photo of destruction wrought during WWI. The date of the photo is unknown, but the belfry was destroyed on October 21, 1914.

200++ Photoshop Photo Effects EmailEmail Have you ever wonder where is that photo effect tutorial you saw the other day and start searching all over the internet but couldn’t find what you saw initially? Honestly, i have.

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