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Virtual Romans

Virtual Romans

http://www.romanleicester.dmu.ac.uk/index.html

Related:  Rome ancienneHistory and ICTICT and History

40 maps that explain the Roman Empire by Timothy B. Lee on August 19, 2014 Two thousand years ago, on August 19, 14 AD, Caesar Augustus died. Online tours Africa Two million years of African history and art through the British Museum collection. Americas Discover the history fo the peoples of the Americas through objects and traditional ways of life. Asia A range of tours encompassing the art and history of Asia from ancient times to the present day. Virtual Heritage - Hadrian's Wall. Brunton Turret Virtual Heritage presents "Hadrian's Wall. Brunton Turret", second Virtual 3D Tour over the most interesting places along the Hadrian's Wall. Brunton Turret (also known as Turret 26B) is one of the best preserved turrets on the line of Hadrian's Wall. It is located east from Roman Cilurnum fort in Chesters, and west from the Onnum fort in Haltonchesters. It was built by soldiers from the ninth cohort of the Twentieth Victorious Valerian Legion (legio XX Valeria Victrix) in 123 AD.

Tollund Man By Susan K. Lewis Posted 02.07.06 NOVA He has become the face of Iron Age Europe. But in 1950, when men cutting peat near the village of Tollund, Denmark, stumbled upon him, they thought he was a modern murder victim. The police, aware of similar ancient bodies, contacted the Silkeborg Museum, and various specialists—archeologists, forensic scientists, radiologists, paleobotanists, even dentists—later studied his body. Here, learn about their findings and get an intimate view of the 2,400-year-old man.

Stone Age teaching resources from the UK’s museums © Creswell Crags Stone Age teaching resources from the UK’s museumsA virtual Stone Age We love Virtually The Ice Age, the online learning resource from Creswell Crags (see photo above), where pupils can discover more about the Stone Age, including: Stone Age people, archaeology and excavation techniques, and the natural world. Don’t miss Could You have Survived The Ice Age? section with a quiz and more info about Stone Age art, camp sites and the tools Stone Age people used. Great images used too. More photos of Stone Age objectsExplore more Stone Age objects in the British Museum’s online collection. Course: Interactive History The Stone Age Archeological prehistory,is commonly divided chronologically into distinct periods, based on the development of tools from stone to bronze and iron, as well as changes in culture and climate that can be determined from the archeological record; but the boundaries of these periods are uncertain, and the changes between them gradual. The earliest inhabitants of Britain for whom there is compelling evidence are bands of hunters living in Southern and Western England during the Hoxnian interglacial (about 380,000 to 400,000 BC). (Some very recent excavations of stone tools on the East Anglian coastline suggest human presence as early as 700,000 years ago). However, as temperatures again dropped, Britain was abandoned.

Collection search Registration numbers The most common type of Museum number begins with the year of acquisition. The database standardises these numbers in the form, for example: 1887,0708.2427 (year: comma: block of four numbers - usually representing a month and day: full-stop and final number). The final number can be of any length and may be followed by another full-stop and a sub-number. In some cases the same number is shared by two or more objects across departments. In some of these cases a prefix has been added before a number (e.g. The Spanish Armada Publication date: 9th December 2010 by Jon Nichol Spanish Armada Beacon This is a highly interactive and stimulating simulation for years 3 and 4, and a very effective way of involving children in a range of issues.

Sutton Hoo On a small hill above the river Deben in Suffolk is a strange-looking field, covered with grassy mounds of different sizes. For several hundred years what lay under them was a mystery. Then in 1938, an archaeologist called Basil Brown started digging under mounds 2, 3 and 4, where he found a few, mostly broken, Anglo-Saxon objects which had been buried alongside their owner's bodies. Sadly, grave robbers had taken most of what was there.

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