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A Powerful App For Every Level Of Bloom's Taxonomy

A Powerful App For Every Level Of Bloom's Taxonomy
Bloom’s Taxonomy has been steadily increasing its presence in my everyday reads lately. The revised version is really speaking to a lot of educators who are using it – often in concert with a variety of technologies – to address the different levels of educational objectives. (Note: If you need a quick refresher on the basics of Bloom’s Taxonomy, check out this post). Using Apps There are a ton of apps out there that address different ideas in the Bloom’s Taxonomy hierarchy. There are a multitude of resources out there that list tons of apps that are relevant. Remembering Apps that fit into the ‘remembering’ bucket include those that improve a student’s ability to identify and recall facts, define terms and concepts, and locate information. Screen Chomp is a free app that is a basic doodling board with markers. Understanding The ‘understanding’ bucket should be filled with apps that allow students to explain concepts and ideas that they have come to understand. Applying Analyzing Evaluating

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Does Bloom’s Taxonomy still have a role to play in e-learning? Mayes and de Freitas (2004) state that the use of technology can be used to achieve better learning outcomes, more effective assessments or a more cost effective way of bringing learning environments to students; and that reforming practice requires transformation of the understanding of the principles. So what are the pedagogical principles behind “e” learning? The definitions of e-learning are numerous and varied but one excepted definition is "learning facilitated and supported through the use of information and communications technology", (JISC, 2003). In their report (2004) Mayes and de Freitas go on to surmise that in this framework (ie e-learning) there are no models for e-learning per se, only e-enhancements of models of learning in general. Blooms Taxonomy (1956) was developed to classify the complexity of questions asked in assessments, ultimately becoming a system for classifying learning outcomes. References

40 Android Apps for Teaching and Learning – ProfHacker - Blogs A few weeks ago I invited readers to share their favorite iPad apps for the classroom, and the comments section features several good suggestions. Last week I asked readers to share their favorite Android apps for the classroom, and… well… we didn’t end up with nearly as many suggestions. I do not own an Android device, but I spent some time searching for apps that might prove useful for pedagogical purposes, and the list below is the result. (I’ve also made this information available as a spreadsheet on GoogleDrive, which you are free to copy and re-use however you like.) In the comments section below, please share any additional suggestions you have of Android apps for the classroom.

Using Bloom's Taxonomy In The 21st Century: 4 Strategies For Teaching 4 Strategies For Teaching With Bloom’s Taxonomy by TeachThought Staff Bloom’s Taxonomy can be a powerful tool to transform teaching and learning. By design, it focuses attention away from content and instruction, and instead emphasizes the “cognitive events” in the mind of a child. And this is no small change. 5 Interesting Ways to Use iPad in The Classroom After the tremendous success following the publication of " 9 starter tips for teachers who have just got a new iPad " iPad4schools has put forward this new graphic featuring a set of interesting ideas teachers and students can try during the 5 minutes, 5 days, and 5 weeks 'when introducing a new initiative or technology.' With each digital tip an app or a couple more are suggested and which can better execute that idea. If you are thinking in Bloom's Taxonomy terms then I must say that most, if not all, of the apps included in this graphic correspond with the "creation" level in the Bloom's thinking continuum. I invite you to have a look and try out some of the ideas mentioned in this work. This graphic is also available for free download in PDF format from this link.

What Sir Ken Got Wrong “We are educating people out of their creativity” Sir Ken Robinson Sir Ken Robinson’s ideas on education are not only impractical; they are undesirable. If you’re interested in education, at some point someone will have sent you a link to a video by Sir Ken Robinson, knighted for services to education in England in 2003. He has over 250,000 followers on Twitter, his videos have had over 40,000,000 views online, and his 2006 lecture is the most viewed TED talk of all time. The RSA Opening Minds curriculum his ideas are associated with is taught in over 200 schools in the UK.

A Primer In Effective Questioning Strategies For Classroom & eLearning - by Rosa Fattahi, WizIQ The Importance of Questioning in the Learning Process Since the ancient days of philosopher Socrates, asking questions has been a critical part of the teaching and learning process. Reading 2.0 Many educators are worried about how technology is affecting the amount of reading that students are doing. They notice that: Students are struggling to read and comprehend longer texts.Students are struggling to read deeply.Many students report that they don’t read outside of school at all. There are a few contributing factors to this, technology being one and high-stakes testing being another. We could also argue that kids aren't reading less, they're reading differently. Non-Readers, Occasional Readers and Digital Readers

Great Blooms Taxonomy Apps for Both Android and Web 2.0 Just a few days ago I posted a comprehensive list of educational iPad apps organized into awesome charts that teachers can print out and use separately. Today, however, I will be sharing with you another set of great charts covering Bloom's Taxonomy apps for both Android and Web 2.0. This work was done by Kathy from Shrock Guide. She has gathered all of the Bloomin'Apps projects in one place.

5 Ways Twitter Can Help in Education - Getting Smart by Guest Author - edchat, social media, twitter By: Pamela Rossow If you are in an educational field as a student, teacher, or parent, you may have wondered about the benefits of social media—specifically Twitter. All that tweeting seems like it could give you a headache. What if Twitter was more than just a way to dish about the amazing Caprese salad you had at lunch and actually a way to help students learn better?

Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming It’s important for people to tell you what side they are on and why, and whether they might be biased. A declaration of members’ interests, of a sort. So, I am going to be talking to you about reading. I’m going to tell you that libraries are important. I’m going to suggest that reading fiction, that reading for pleasure, is one of the most important things one can do. The 10-Minute Guide To Bloom's Taxonomy Bloom’s Taxonomy is one of the most cited theoretical constructions within education and e-learning. This is well earned since, after its first publication in 1956, the taxonomy has quickly become an important milestone within educational theory. However there are many professionals within the educational and e-learning fields that have only a vague idea of what the Taxonomy is all about, or that have only met the taxonomy (or some revisited version of these findings) for the Cognitive domain only, leaving the Affective and Psychomotor domains at the margins, if not completely out of the picture. The aim of this video is to provide a 10-minute overview of the Taxonomy for all the 3 domains: Cognitive, Affective, and Psychomotor. There is much more to explore about Bloom’s taxonomy, this video should be seen as the starting point for a journey into finding a way to organize learning objectives in a meaningful and useful way, by using the brilliant work of Bloom and his colleagues.

10 questions to ask yourself before giving an assessment 1). What's the point and purpose of the assessment? 2).

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