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Sunlight Foundation Tools and Projects

Sunlight Foundation Tools and Projects
180 Degrees description retired Identify attendees of influential hearings and events. Ad Hawk mobile description retired Identify political TV and radio ads. Call on Congress description retired Toll-free service to learn about and call Congress. Capitol Words description Explore and compare what Congress says. Checking Influence description retired See the political activity behind your everyday spending. Churnalism US description retired Detect similarities between articles, press releases and more.

http://sunlightfoundation.com/tools/

Related:  Governance

Top 10 Logical Fallacies in Politics The human brain is wired all wrong. Those not versed in logic are blissfully unaware of how much our brain messes up the most basic of arguments, leading to the mess of random thoughts, non-sequiturs, cognitive dissonance, white lies, misinformation, and syntax errors that we call consciousness. Luckily, there is one place where all of these logical misteps can be exemplified: politics. What follows is a crash course in some of the most prevelant fallacies we all make, as they appear in modern American politics. And though I consider these the "top 10" logical fallacies in politics, they are not in order, for reasons that should become clear rather quickly. President Bush and Senator Kerry, congratulations on making it through an entire televised debate without answering a single question!

Data Visualization and Infographics Examples and Resources Things wordy, geeky, and webby Since taking a class that discussed Edward Tufte‘s work, I’ve been fascinated by turning information into visual data. His site contains many examples that you could easily spend hours on the site. I have. Plus, I spent several days browsing sites with articles, resources, and examples of infovis (information visualization) in action. It’s not just about presenting data in a presentation or making things colorful.

Sunlight at the International Open Data Hackathon This past Saturday was the second annual International Open Data Hackathon, a globally coordinated day for people to gather and hack on open public data from the world's governments. As part of this, POPVOX hosted an Open Data event here in DC at the MLK Memorial Public Library. Several Sunlighters showed up, and we had a pretty great time. Andrew and I came expecting to work alone on our project, an ambitious attempt to bridge the data gap between legislation and the regulations they generate, that we're tentatively titling Crosslaws.

CQ Roll Call Site Will Help Users Contact Legislators There are Web sites that cover the actions and inactions of Congress. And there are Web sites that let voters contact their members of Congress and comment. CQ Roll Call wants to bridge the two. The Ugly History Behind ‘Religious Freedom’ Laws - Washington Spectator From Ava Duvernay’s award-winning film to President Barack Obama’s speech at the Edmund Pettus Bridge, to the thousands we crossed the bridge with and the millions that joined by television, America has remembered Selma, Alabama, this year. We have honored grassroots leaders who organized for years, acknowledged the sacrifices of civil-rights workers, and celebrated the great achievement of the Voting Rights Act. At the same time, we have recalled the hatred and fear of white supremacy in 1960s Alabama. But we may not have looked closely enough at this ugly history. Even as we celebrate one of America’s great strides toward freedom, the ugliest ghosts of our past haunt us in today’s “religious freedom” laws. Many have pointed out the problem of laws purporting to protect the First Amendment right to religious freedom by creating an opportunity to violate another’s 14th Amendment right to equal protection under the law.

Tipped over: social influence "tipping point" theory debunked Clive Thompson has been getting some well-deserved attention for his recent Fast Company piece, in which Columbia University sociologist Duncan Watts explodes the hierarchical theory of social influence and trend propagation popularized by Malcolm Gladwell in the bestselling book The Tipping Point. Gladwell's model, which has itself become something of a cultural epidemic, posits that a few hyperconnected "influentials" are the key to the runaway viral spread of fads, fashions, ideas, and behaviors. These pivotal individuals, according to Gladwell, determine which trends will wither on the vine and which will "tip," becoming mass phenomena. But Watts, a pioneer in the mathematical modeling of social networks, has tested the "tipping point" hypothesis, both empirically and in computer simulations.

Hong kong : Données publiques / Open Data is a portal to facilitate the wider dissemination of Public Sector Information (PSI) for value-added re-use. We believe that PSI is not only a valuable source of reference, but may also generate valuable applications. Facilitating value-added re-use of PSI will be conducive to the development of Hong Kong as a knowledge-based economy. How to Ask Candidates Questions that Make a Difference by Fran Korten Tips for spreading your ideas without getting the runaround. posted Feb 24, 2012 The Occupy movement has changed the political conversation. What Silicon Valley Really Thinks About Politics, An Attempted Measurement — The Ferenstein Wire How do Founders’ core values differ from traditional Democrats and Libertarians? Libertarians care about liberty, traditional Democrats value equality, founders prioritize something entirely different. Unlike Libertarians, Founders are extremely collectivist. As I was conducting pre-interviews to design the questionnaire instrument, I discovered that founders spoke presumptively of a tightly interconnected world: everything we do, even what we eat, affects other people. So, I turned it into a question, asking respondents whether they think everything we do affects other people, justifying government intervention in personal decisions. Most founders agreed.

Republicans’ Climate Change Denial Denial Future historians — if there are any future historians — will almost surely say that the most important thing happening in the world during December 2015 was the climate talks in Paris. True, nothing agreed to in Paris will be enough, by itself, to solve the problem of global warming. But the talks could mark a turning point, the beginning of the kind of international action needed to avert catastrophe. Then again, they might not; we may be doomed.

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