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Nation Performing Arts Convention

Nation Performing Arts Convention
Like e-mail in the ‘90s and the web at the dawn of the new millennium, artists and organizations—as a matter of business—have had to adapt to these new modes of communication and integrate these tools into their operations. Web 2.0 and social platforms like Digg and Delicious, YouTube, Flickr, and Facebook have pushed the electronic envelope even further up the learning curve. Along comes Twitter, and the real-time revolution is on—just as mobile technologies have gone viral. Social media is where the jobs will be. New jobs mean new roles and new responsibilities. “Managing communities is much more complex than traditional outreach,” Levy added. Keeping track of all the important discussions and news and other relevant audience engagement—disseminated via channels like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Vimeo, and myriad others—requires more than just technical and social skills. You can Retweet, favorite, or copy urls, but it’s not the same. Related:  Content Curationcuration

The Conversation Prism by Brian Solis and JESS3 Curator Curator responsibilities[edit] In smaller organizations, a curator may have sole responsibility for the acquisition and care of objects. The curator will make decisions regarding what objects to take, oversee their potential and documentations, conduct research based on the collection and history that provides proper packaging of art for transportation, and shares that research with the public and community through exhibitions and publications. In very small volunteer-based museums, such as local historical societies, a curator may be the only paid staff member. In larger institutions, the curator's primary function is as a subject specialist, with the expectation that he or she will conduct original research on objects and guide the organization in its collecting. Such institutions can have multiple curators, each assigned to a specific collecting area (e.g., Curator of Ancient Art, Curator of Prints and Drawings, etc.) and often operating under the direction of a head curator.

Content Curation & Fair Use: 5 Rules to being an Ethical Content Curator * Update: I have a much lengthier updated post that incorporates the material below: Content Curation: Copyright, Ethics, & Fair Use Recently, Kimberley Isbell of the Nieman Journalism Lab cited a Harvard Law report and published an extensive post on news aggregation and legal considerations. From a curation perspective, the whole article is interesting, but what was the most surprising was that her recommendations for being an ethical content aggregator, were the same as being an effective content curator. The five recommendations are below. You can read the full article for the legal justifications for abiding by these practices. 1. Marketing reason: The more you link to third parties, the more likely they are to link back to you – which ultimately improves your SEO. 2. Marketing reason: A good content curator is selective an only links to the most relevant content on a specific topic or issue. 3. 4. 5. *Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer.

Can 'Curation' Save Media? A Marketer’s Guide to Content Curation There is an elephant in the online marketing “room,” and the elephant’s name is Curation. Curation is the most important part of online marketing that no one is talking about. With the rise of inbound marketing, content has become front and center in the minds of marketers. This focus on content as an important marketing tactic creates two extremely important problems. First, content creation is difficult. Applying Curation to Our Problems As marketers, how do we solve these two problems? Curation has become a fixture for many successful news blogs on the web today. Examples of Curation Some of the most popular posts on this blog have been from curated content. 3 Rules for Great Curation 1. 2. 3. Integrating Curation Into the Content Mix Curation has many applications. How do you use curation for your inbound marketing efforts? Photo Credit: joyosity

La troisième frontière du Web » Article » OWNI, Digital Journalism PDG de Pearltrees et auteur du blog Cratyle, Patrice Lamothe expose dans ce billet les différentes phase de développement du Web. Parti d'un micro-démocratie où "chacun disposait de tous les attributs d'un média", le réseau semble actuellement en mesure de franchir une frontière : celle qui vise à permettre à chacun d'être un média complet... PDG de Pearltrees et auteur du blog Cratyle, Patrice Lamothe expose dans ce billet les différentes phase de développement du Web. Parti d’un micro-démocratie où “chacun disposait de tous les attributs d’un média”, le réseau semble actuellement en mesure de franchir une frontière : celle qui vise à permettre à chacun d’être un média complet. Chacun sent que le Web entre aujourd’hui dans une nouvelle phase de son développement. Les tentatives de synthèse fleurissent, mais ne semblent pas suffire à rendre compte des évolutions en cours. Peut-être trouvera-t-on d’ailleurs inutile de vouloir décrire les évolutions d’ensemble du Web? La troisième frontière

PJA Radio The Curation Buzz... And PearlTrees Posted by Tom Foremski - April 12, 2010 My buddy Dave Galbraith is the first person I remember to first start talking about curation and the Internet, several years ago. He even named his company Curations, and created a tool/site for curation: Wists. And his site SmashingTelly - is great example of curation, a hand-picked collection of great videos. Today, much is written about curation and the Internet but it all seems mostly talk because we don't really have the tools we need. Robert Scoble writes about The Seven Needs of Real-Time Curators "... who does curation? Reading Robert Scoble's post on curation, it almost seemed as if he were describing PearlTrees, a company I've recently been working with in an advisory role, when he talks about "info atoms and molecules." ...what are info atoms? PearlTrees is very similar, it's a curation tool that uses "pearls" as a visual metaphor for a web site, a Twitter post, an image, or a video. More to come... Tweet this story Follow @tomforemski

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