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20 Basic Rules For Digital Citizenship

20 Basic Rules For Digital Citizenship
The definition of digital citizenship has to do with the quality of behaviors that impact the quality of digital content and communities. To help clarify what that “quality” can look like, knowthenet.org.uk put together the following infographic framed around Dos and Don’ts. While seemingly written for a more general audience than students and educators, the thinking is sound, including “Treat others they way you want to be treated,” “Don’t forget the human behind the screen,” “Listen first, talk later,” and “Use proper grammar.” (Yes, please do.) Overall it’s a bit basic, but it does take the important step of moving beyond rhetoric to offer concrete tips to realize the idea. 20 Basic Rules For Digital Citizenship

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10 Interactive Lessons By Google On Digital Citizenship YouTube has a firm place in the current classroom. From Khan Academy’s videos to YouTube EDU and beyond, there’s a reason all these videos are finding a home in schools. In an effort to help keep the ball rolling, Google just launched a set of 10 interactive lessons designed to support teachers in educating students on digital citizenship. A topic obviously quite close to Google’s heart. Google (which owns YouTube) built the lessons to educate students about YouTube’s policies, how to flag content, how to be a safer online citizen, and protect their identities. Digital Citizenship Flashcards Another academic year is here and with it comes new clothes, lessons, and of course, new technologies. But are your child's digital citizenship skills back-to-school ready? If not, don't worry. To help them make the grade, download these flashcards to help them boost their online know-how. From safety and privacy to literacy and online responsibility, these cards cover digital citizenship basics and have conversation starters to get you and your child thinking and talking.

Teaching Screenagers:Character Education for the Digital Age Our current technological trajectory promises unfathomable, roller-coaster innovation with no braking system. While the ride is exciting, it moves so quickly that we typically don't have time to think about the possible unintended consequences that might accompany it. The result is that we find ourselves unable to effectively respond to hot-button issues like cyberbullying and sexting because they seem to come out of nowhere. Our challenge is to find ways to teach our children how to navigate the rapidly moving digital present, consciously and reflectively. Basic Internet Safety Learning to recognize the warning signs of these risks will allow trusted adults to intervene and lessen potential negative impacts. By acting as a resource, parents and guardians can help make the Internet a safer place for their families. As a parent or guardian, you should stay well-informed about current issues to understand what your children are experiencing on and off the Internet. If they are social networking, instant messaging, using webcams, or blogging, help them use these tools safely by learning how to use them yourself. Children whose parents and guardians regularly talk to them about personal safety are more likely to exhibit responsible behavior on their own.[1] NetSmartz invites you to learn about the issues surrounding your children’s online lives.

Digital footprint What is your digital footprint? Your digital footprint is everything on the internet that is about you. This could include Infographic: Citizenship in the digital age By now it’s become clear: For all its wonders, the digital age has also introduced its fair share of challenges. From social media and cyberbullying to cybercrime, internet addiction and online privacy concerns, today’s students face a wide range of difficult issues that previous generations never had to think about. As a result, teachers, school leaders and parents are called on to add a whole new idea to our curricula: digital citizenship. And yet, we don’t have to start from scratch. The elements of digital citizenship, it turns out, are not so different from the basic tenets of traditional citizenship: Be kind, respectful and responsible, and just do the right thing.

On Facebook, a growing teenage wasteland Facebook acknowledges that teen users are becoming less active on the siteNewer social tools like Snapchat, Instagram and Vine are picking up steam insteadSurveyed teens said "drama" and the presence of adults have cooled them to FacebookBut teens who don't use Facebook as much don't close their accounts Five-Minute Film Festival: Teaching Digital Citizenship "Digital citizenship" is an umbrella term that covers a whole host of important issues. Broadly, it's the guidelines for responsible, appropriate behavior when one is using technology. But specifically, it can cover anything from "netiquette" to cyberbullying; technology access and the digital divide; online safety and privacy; copyright, plagiarism, and digital law, and more. In fact, some programs that teach digital citizenship have outlined no less than nine elements that intersect to inform a well-equipped digital citizen. It's an overwhelming array of skills to be taught and topics to explore.

Assess Yourself We have a few options for you to assess your learning, challenge yourself and get some immediate feedback. Here they are: Self Assessments: What Do You Think? Before you start, find out what you think! The self assessments are designed to pose a few questions to help you identify what you think about the topics in each section. Your answers will guide you to what you might want to learn more about. Online Safety: A Teacher’s Guide to Dealing with Cyberbullying, Sexting, and Student Privacy Social media and text messages have blurred the lines between students’ school lives and private lives. While most schools take clear steps to protect students at school, more schools are beginning to consider the need to set policies that apply to students’ activities outside of school. When it comes to questionable online activities like cyberbullying and sexting, kids sometimes feel pressured to follow the crowd. Teachers can play a crucial role in setting high expectations for online behavior. Schools can open conversations about online safety so that students learn to set personal boundaries and feel more comfortable reporting incidents like bullying and harassment.

6 Pros And Cons Of Social Media In The Classroom 6 Pros & Cons Of Social Media In The Classroom by Aimee Hosler Like it or not, American youth are decidedly online. According to a 2013 report by Pew Research, 78 percent of teens have cell phones, and almost half of those are smartphones — which means they can log onto the Internet virtually anywhere, any time.

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