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Muscle Atlas

Muscle Atlas

The Human Brain · Atlas of the Human Brain · Brain in Stereotaxic Space Brain – The Atlas of the Human Brain in Stereotaxic Space A short introduction in to the Atlas of the Human Brain and the Brain used throughout for the research on this site. To take a more systematical approach to the use of the provided material both on the DVD from the "Atlas of the Human Brain" and the applications you can find on this website the following explanatory steps might help. Figure 1: The Brain used for research in the "Atlas of the Human Brain" and which are used for the main applications is from a 24-year-old male from the Vogt collection in Düsseldorf. Figure 2: After determining the surface of the brain the brain is cut in 5 blocks prior to the sectioning process according to the sterotaxic space. Figure 3: Following the delineation process based on analysis of the cyto- and myelostructure of each slice, there are several reconstructions in three dimensions. Material and applications in this section Surface Views To the Surface views Sections Explore the Brain Atlas

Artistic Anatomy Is learning to draw anatomy in a classroom more secure (since there is a teacher to check the work and possibly a book to study from) in practicing artistic anatomy drawing, or should artists focus on just practicing from images on websites/blogs like this tumblr? Asketh - pjmx24 Depending on the size of your class and where you are, your teacher can be a great guide to help you and show you what areas you need to focus on more to improve and give you good material to work from! If your class size is too big (ideally a class of no more than 15 is optimal for a teacher to give extensive feedback to all students) you might not get enough feedback to really improve as much as possible to your full potential. Outside of class (or if you have no class) you should focus on drawing in a sketchbook dedicated for life drawing/anatomy. Hope that gives you some insight!

e-meducation.org Cochrane Journal Club Radiopaedia.org, the wiki-based collaborative Radiology resource Clinical Cases and Images - Case-based Curriculum of Clinical Medicine Flashcards: The world's largest online library of printable flash cards MedRevise:: free medical revision notes! Welcome to LearningRadiology Breath Sounds Lung sounds Breath Sounds Auscultation of lungs help determine the airway and alveolar integrity, ventilation and presence of abnormality. There are two normal breath sounds. Bronchial and vesicular . Breath sounds heard over the tracheobronchial tree are called bronchial breathing and breath sounds heard over the lung tissue are called vesicular breathing. The only place where tracheobronchial trees are close to chest wall without surrounding lung tissue are trachea, right sternoclavicular joints and posterior right interscapular space. Method of Exam Use the diaphragm of the stethoscope. Note the intensity of breath sounds, symmetry, length of inspiration and expiration. Normal The bronchial breath sounds over the trachea has a higher pitch, louder, inspiration and expiration are equal and there is a pause between inspiration and expiration. The vesicular breathing is heard over the thorax, lower pitched and softer than bronchial breathing. Caution:

The Human Brain Atlas at Michigan State University Keith D. Sudheimer, Brian M. Winn, Garrett M. Kerndt, Jay M. Shoaps, Kristina K. Radiology Department, Communications Technology Laboratory, and College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University; National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology A note concerning stained sections: In this atlas you can view MRI sections through a living human brain as well as corresponding sections stained for cell bodies or for nerve fibers. Introduction and methods Acknowledgments

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