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Anatomy and Physiology Learning Modules - CEHD - U of M

Anatomy and Physiology Learning Modules - CEHD - U of M

http://msjensen.cehd.umn.edu/webanatomy/

Related:  Anatomy

2nd Biannual NGSS STEM Education Conference Download the conference schedule and a map Session 1 Arms & Arteries: Adventures in Biomechanical Engineering Looking for ways to integrate engineering into your life science and biology classes? Organelles.org PEROXISOME (microbodies) Size: 0.1-1.0 Fm in diameter Location: Cytoplasm Anatomy Videos <span>To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript.</span> These animated videos show the anatomy of body parts and organ systems and how diseases and conditions affect them. The videos play in QuickTime format. If you do not have QuickTime, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you view a video. You can download the Apple QuickTime player at:

Teacher Resources — Virtual Clinical Trials - About The Series About The Series Players use scientific methods and process skills as they learn the process for designing and conducting a trial, the underlying neuroscience behind the medical advances being tested, and the related careers involved. 2013 Interactive Media Award Virtual Clinical Trials received an Interactive Media Award for Outstanding Achievement. View award

Molecular Expressions Cell Biology: Ribosomes Ribosomes All living cells contain ribosomes, tiny organelles composed of approximately 60 percent ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and 40 percent protein. However, though they are generally described as organelles, it is important to note that ribosomes are not bound by a membrane and are much smaller than other organelles. Some cell types may hold a few million ribosomes, but several thousand is more typical. The organelles require the use of an electron microscope to be visually detected. Ribosomes are mainly found bound to the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope, as well as freely scattered throughout the cytoplasm, depending upon whether the cell is plant, animal, or bacteria. 11 Free Tools to Teach Human Anatomy in 3D The following are some good resources to help students explore the human body through interactive imaging, games, exercises and more. Build-a Body: This is a great website that allows students to build the human body using interactive elements system by system. Each system has descriptions and provides some facts about diseases. Students will only drag and drop the parts of body such as bones, organs,..ect.

Teacher Resources — N-Squad - About The Game About The Game Students work with forensic scientists to solve an alcohol related crime. Along the way, they will learn about alcohol's interaction in different body systems: digestive, circulatory, and nervous. About The Game Students work with forensic scientists to solve an alcohol related crime. Along the way, they will learn about alcohol's interaction in different body systems: digestive, circulatory, and nervous. Atlas Anatomy, C1 Cervical Vertebrae Diagram & Function The vertebral column, or spinal column, is made up of 33 vertebrae, which are grouped into 5 regions: cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacral, and coccyx. At the cervical region the spinal column is further classified into an upper and lower cervical region. The atlas is one of the two upper cervical vertebrae, also known as C1, which is the topmost vertebra of the spinal column. It is the vertebra that is in contact with the occipital bone, a flat bone located at the back portion of the head. This first cervical bone is named from the mythical Greek god who carried the world on his shoulders, as its function is to support the globe of the head.

Anatomy and Physiology animations Listed below are a collection of physiology animations and anatomy animations. These animations are intended to support text or lecture and it is important that they are not seen as stand-alone reference material. Notes: If you or your students discover any factual errors in the animations please let me know: andrew@visualization.org.uk Some of the animations can only be accessed from the university network - please contact Liz Hodgson in the LDU if you would like them on WebCT so that students can access them externally. Visual detail in Flash animations can often be magnified (click on the animation with the right mouse button and use the zoom control)

Life Sciences Outreach Program The following resources were developed for classroom use by high school biology teachers who participated in MCB-HHMI Outreach's Summer 2009 "Experimental Biology and Multimedia Workshop". This year's topic was "Physiology". Keep in mind that lesson formats vary greatly because each was developed with a particular classroom in mind. All lessons align with state and national science standards as described within the lesson or in an accompanying file. Understanding Your BMI and Making Healthy Choices Catherine Erickson (Introductory Biology)

Anatomy and Physiology Interactive Video Animations Introductory Anatomy Human Anatomy and Physiology Visually Learn About the Human Body Using Our Interactive "Flash" Animations Get Body Smart by ConceptCreators A Collection of Physiology and Anatomy Animations by University of Central Lancashire Anatomy & Physiology Animations

Brain Atlas - Introduction The central nervous system (CNS) consists of the brain and the spinal cord, immersed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Weighing about 3 pounds (1.4 kilograms), the brain consists of three main structures: the cerebrum, the cerebellum and the brainstem. Cerebrum - divided into two hemispheres (left and right), each consists of four lobes (frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal).

Zygote Body - Interactive Human Body Browser for your Whiteboard Biologists who wanted a human body browser in the same style as Google Earth, Google Sky, Google Moon etc got very excited a few years ago when Google brought out its Body Browser. They then got sad when Google retired it. Well it looks like it’s back (sort of) under new management and is now called Zygote Body. But it looks exactly the same as it did when it was Google Body, which is great.

Human Sense Organs - The Five Senses Aristotle (384 BC - 322 BC) is credited with the traditional classification of the five sense organs: sight, smell, taste, touch, and hearing. As far back as the 1760's, the famous philosopher Immanuel Kant proposed that our knowledge of the outside world depends on our modes of perception. In order to define what is "extrasensory" we need to define what is "sensory".

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