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Real Time Farms - Know Where Your Food Comes From

Real Time Farms - Know Where Your Food Comes From

http://www.realtimefarms.com/

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Stone Barns Center - It All Adds Up: The True Costs of Farming Jane Black is an award-winning New York food writer who covers food politics, trends and sustainability issues. Her work appears in The Washington Post (where she was a staff writer), The New York Times, The Atlantic, Slate, New York magazine and other publications. She is currently at work on a book about one West Virginia community's struggle to change the way it eats. Stone Barns Center invited Jane to be our guest columnist for the coming year, taking on complex, timely issues in food and agriculture that are important to our mission. We welcome her perspective; the views and opinions expressed here are hers and not necessarily those of Stone Barns Center. Let us know what you think.

NOVA The 100-Year-Old Idea That Could Change Flight Inspired by birds, bats, and the Wright brothers, engineers are building the next breakthrough in aviation. From NOVA Next | Feb 22, 2017 Key Brain Regions Found To Be Smaller in People With ADHD In the largest study of its kind, research shows people with ADHD have smaller brain regions—including the amygdala, which is responsible for regulating emotions. From NOVA Next | Feb 17, 2017

In New York City, Growing Greens As Art and Local Food - Environment I was sitting on a desk in Jenna Spevack’s studio for about 20 minutes before I realized it was actually a piece of art. It was a month before her the opening of her show, "8 Extraordinary Greens," and the pieces were still stuffed into her studio, a corner of a vast shared space on the 7th floor of a former bank in Brooklyn. Trays of Spevack’s greens sat on the bookshelf, and she had shown me a small suitcase in which she’d installed one of the mini-farms. She had pulled out the table so we could sit down to talk, but I’d popped on top in order to sit a little closer to her. How to Design a Shared Backyard Article and images cross-posted from Modern Farmer. Written by Virginia C. McGuire.

Solve Puzzles for Science Hey everyone! I will be leading a Science Café about Foldit at the Southpaw Social Club, in San Diego, on April 28. The purpose of the event is to engage with the community in a casual, comfortable setting to talk about the exciting science of protein folding and the Foldit computer game. Eccentric town, Todmorden, growing ALL its own veg By Vincent Graff Updated: 16:31 GMT, 10 December 2011 Admittedly, it sounds like the most foolhardy of criminal capers, and one of the cheekiest, too. Outside the police station in the small Victorian mill town of Todmorden, West Yorkshire, there are three large raised flower beds.

Sowing and Distributing Centuries-Old Seeds “Feel them. Smell them. Taste them,” urged instructor Melissa Kruse-Peeples, the Conservation Program Manager at Native Seeds/SEARCH. Can Marijuana Lift Colorado Out of the Recession? iStockphoto/Thinkstock Colorado raked in $5 million in tax revenue in 2011 from medical marijuana businesses, and its cities collected hundreds of thousands more from the budding industry. With Colorado voters poised to legalize marijuana for recreational use this November, their tax coffers could be facing an avalanche of new funds currently being lost to the black market. But tax revenues aren’t the only potential economic benefit hinging on legal weed. If voters pass Amendment 64, which would legalize marijuana and regulate it like alcohol, the state will save $12 million in criminal and court costs in the first year, according to a report by the Colorado Center on Law & Policy.

Smart Meters, Science and Belief Annie Tritt for The New York TimesDeborah Tavares, with a sign protesting smart-meter installations, in Sebastopol, Calif. In researching Monday’s article about opposition to smart meters, I found myself once again facing a dilemma built into environmental reporting: how to evaluate whether claims of health effects caused by some environmental contaminant — chemicals, noise, radiation, whatever — are potentially valid? I turned, as usual, to the peer-reviewed science. But some very intelligent people I interviewed had little use for the existing (if sparse) science. How, in a rational society, does one understand those who reject science, a common touchstone of what is real and verifiable? The absence of scientific evidence doesn’t dissuade those who believe childhood vaccines are linked to autism, or those who believe their headaches, dizziness and other symptoms are caused by cellphones and smart meters.

11 Rules for Beginning Farmers to Live By In days gone by, farms were passed on from one generation to the next. A farm was among a family’s most treasured and valuable possessions, and the knowledge of how to manage the farm was handed down with just as much care as the property deed. However, in modern times, the number of family farms has drastically dwindled. According to U.S. census data, the number of farms that earn more than $1,000 in agricultural income annually has dropped from nearly 7 million in 1935 to just over 2 million today. As a result, there are far fewer experienced farmers than ever before.

Brain Welcome to the pycortex WebGL MRI viewer! This viewer shows how information about thousands of object and action categories is represented across human neocortex. The data come from brain activity measurements made using fMRI while a participant watched hours of movie trailers. Computational modeling procedures were used to determine how 1705 distinct object and action categories are represented in the brain. Further details on this work can be found in this video or in the paper by Huth, Nishimoto, Vu and Gallant (2012), "A continuous semantic space describes the representation of thousands of object and action categories across the human brain", Neuron 2012.

The Drought Fighter - Craftsmanship Magazine Topics: Climate Change, Drought, Farming, Fertility, Food, Organic Agriculture, Science, Soil Health, Urban Farming Locations: California, Sebastopol Materials: Bugs, Carbon, Compost, Plants, Soil Masters: Paul Kaiser: Drought Fighter Could a controversial farmer in California have found the most effective way to grow food in a warming world? By TODD OPPENHEIMER On Singing Frogs Farm, a relatively minuscule, 8-acre operation in Sebastopol, California, Paul Kaiser says he is grossing more than $100,000 an acre just by harvesting vegetables. This is an astronomical sum for an urban farmer in today’s world.

Breaking the Speed of (Light) Thought An announcement a couple of weeks ago claimed that the speed of light had been broken. A pair of German physicists, Dr. Gunter Nimtz and Dr. Alfons Stahlhofen, of the University of Koblenz, claimed that they measured microwave photons – energetic packets of light – traveling “instantaneously” between a pair of prisms.

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