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Six Habits of Highly Empathic People

Republished from greatergood.berkeley.edu By Roman Krznaric If you think you’re hearing the word “empathy” everywhere, you’re right. It’s now on the lips of scientists and business leaders, education experts and political activists. But there is a vital question that few people ask: How can I expand my own empathic potential? Empathy is not just a way to extend the boundaries of your moral universe. According to new research, it’s a habit we can cultivate to improve the quality of our own lives. But what is empathy? The big buzz about empathy stems from a revolutionary shift in the science of how we understand human nature. Over the last decade, neuroscientists have identified a 10-section “empathy circuit” in our brains which, if damaged, can curtail our ability to understand what other people are feeling. But empathy doesn’t stop developing in childhood. Habit 1: Cultivate curiosity about strangers Highly empathic people (HEPs) have an insatiable curiosity about strangers. Related:  Charmed LifeHabits

How to Read Body Language Key Points Look for emotional cues, such as crying, anger, or embarrassment. More ↓Look for physical cues to determine the status of a relationship. ↓Learn how to read eyes and body language for attraction cues. ↓Study a person's eyes, facial expressions, and body language to read specific cues, such as power Steps Reading Emotional Cues <img alt="Image titled Read Body Language Step 1" src=" width="728" height="546" class="whcdn" onload="WH.performance.clearMarks('image1_rendered'); WH.performance.mark('image1_rendered');">1Watch for crying. <img alt="Image titled Read Body Language Step 5" src=" width="728" height="546" class="whcdn">5Notice any manifestations of pride. Reading Relational Cues Reading Attraction Cues

The Science of Good Habits and How to Form Them Taking a long term view of success is critical, and it doesn’t take a psychologist to tell you that discipline is how you get from Point A to the sometimes elusive Point B. Or as Aristotle would so aptly put it… We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit. Since that’s the case, how can we actually form good habits and make them stick? If you’ve asked yourself the same question, you’re in luck—today I’ll be covering a large selection of research on the psychology of planning and keeping the habits that matter. Let’s dive in! A Big Misconception About Building Habits First things first, I want to address a major misconception that many people have about building habits. One of the big habit myths is this belief that it only takes 21 days to form any habit. Actual academic research on the subject shows us this popular belief just isn’t true at all: how “long” it takes to form a habit depends on the individual, the habit being formed, environmental factors, etc.

10 Psychological Studies That Will Change What You Think You Know About Yourself Why do we do the things we do? Despite our best attempts to “know thyself,” the truth is that we often know astonishingly little about our own minds, and even less about the way others think. As Charles Dickens once put it, “A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.” Psychologists have long sought insights into how we perceive the world and what motivates our behavior, and they’ve made enormous strides in lifting that veil of mystery. We all have some capacity for evil. Arguably the most famous experiment in the history of psychology, the 1971 Stanford prison study put a microscope on how social situations can affect human behavior. The experiment, which was scheduled to last for two weeks, had to be cut short after just six days due to the guards’ abusive behavior — in some cases they even inflicted psychological torture — and the extreme emotional stress and anxiety exhibited by the prisoners. Getty

The Ultimate Cheat Sheet For Reinventing Yourself Editor’s note: James Altucher is an investor, programmer, author, and several-times entrepreneur. His latest book, is “Choose Yourself!” (foreword by Dick Costolo, CEO of Twitter) . Follow him on Twitter @jaltucher. Here are the rules: I’ve been at zero a few times, come back a few times, and done it over and over. I’ve started entire new careers. I’ve had to change careers several times. There are other ways to reinvent yourself, so take what I say with a grain of salt. I’ve seen it work for maybe a few hundred other people. A) Reinvention never stops. Every day you reinvent yourself. B) You start from scratch. Every label you claim you have from before is just vanity. C) You need a mentor. Else, you’ll sink to the bottom. D) Three types of mentors Direct. E) Don’t worry if you don’t have passion for anything. You have passion for your health. F) Time it takes to reinvent yourself: five years. Here’s a description of the five years: Sometimes I get frustrated in years 1-4. Today. Today.

This is Your Brain on Habits Emily vanSonnenberg, MAPP '10, currently operates a private practice called Psych Positive for individuals, couples, and families, especially working on improving complex non-traditional relationships such as those between step-parents and step-children. In the summer of 2012, she starts teaching Positive Psychology again at UCLA Extension. She consults with organizations on employee well-being and leadership strategies. How many of you admit to having at least one bad habit you’d rather do without? How? What is a Habit? A habit is automatic behavior that occurs without much conscious thought. The term, habit is often thought of as the automatic behavioral engagement in a destructive activity. It will, undoubtedly, require effort to form new and positive habits. The Brain on Habits MIT researcher Thorn and colleagues have identified areas located within the brain that account for habit formation, namely the basal ganglia. Okay, so you tried something once. Examples of Positive Habits Images

The Happiness Project Toolbox 5 Scientific Ways to Build Habits That Stick “We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit.” Sobering words from Aristotle, and an astute reminder that success doesn’t come overnight. On the contrary, it’s discipline that gets you from Point A to the often elusive Point B. In our day-to-day lives, habits can often be tough to build, as there are plenty of distractions that can lead us off the “straight and narrow” and right back to our old ways. 1. In a fascinating study on motivation, researchers found abstract thinking to be an effective method to help with discipline. The answer is to create what I call “micro quotas” and “macro goals.” Writer/developer Nathan Barry has made for a great case study of the use of these quotas as someone who forced himself to write 1000 words per day come hell or high-water. 2. Creating sticky habits is far easier when we make use of our current routines, instead of trying to fight them. 3. 4. According to this study from UCLA, the mistake is in what we visualize. 5.

How to Rewire Your Brain to Be More Kind Toward Others Kindness is the state of caring about other people’s well-being and taking action to help make other people’s lives better and happier. It is a social glue that allows us to connect with others and build meaningful relationships with them When someone does something kind for us, we like them more and we want to cooperate with them more. When we do something kind for someone, we earn their trust and respect, and we feel better about ourselves for being a good person. Kindness is a reciprocal relationship. The more we practice kindness, the easier it is. Every thought and action we do fires neurons in our brain. Here are scientifically supported ways we can increase our kindness toward others. Get your intentions right Having good intentions is the first step toward being kinder toward others and building positive relationships with them. Cultivating the right attitude about others is often necessary before we start acting in kinder ways. See from the other person’s perspective

Article According to a Stanford psychologist, you’ll reach new heights if you learn to embrace the occasional tumble. One day last November, psychology professor Carol Dweck welcomed a pair of visitors from the Blackburn Rovers, a soccer team in the United Kingdom’s Premier League. The Rovers’ training academy is ranked in England’s top three, yet performance director Tony Faulkner had long suspected that many promising players weren’t reaching their potential. On some level, Faulkner knew the source of the trouble: British soccer culture held that star players are born, not made. A 60-year-old academic psychologist might seem an unlikely sports motivation guru. What’s more, Dweck has shown that people can learn to adopt the latter belief and make dramatic strides in performance. As a graduate student at Yale, Dweck started off studying animal motivation. At the time, the suggested cure for learned helplessness was a long string of successes. Read a January 2010 update on this story.

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