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The "New and Improved" Digital Citizenship Survival Kit

The "New and Improved" Digital Citizenship Survival Kit
I have been thinking about some "new" items I could add to my original Digital Citizenship Kit that I created last year. Like I said in that blog post, I love using props when teaching. After some great conversations with the good wife @jenbadura on what I should include, I have come up with some new items to include in the survival kit. Yes, you can use this with your students! After I blogged about the original kit, I had a plethora of teachers email me or send me a tweet me asking if it was okay to use this idea at their school. Please do! Packet of Seeds Any packet of seeds will do for your kit. Plug In I used a six foot extension cord and cut it so that I have the male and female end together. Mirror Imagine having the mirror attached to your computer/device. Sheet of Paper One of the most powerful items in the kit. Magnifying Glass Remember when first impressions started with a handshake? Strainer The amount of information on the internet is amazing! Soap

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Beyond Emily: Post-ing Etiquette Educators offer guidelines for promoting good online behavior. Some educators are leading the way to school-based netiquette education with guidelines advising students on what to do, and what to avoid, in online communication. We've put together excerpts from some sample guidelines. Florida Virtual School This public virtual school for secondary school students includes netiquette in its online orientation for new students. 5 Reasons You Should Be Teaching Digital Citizenship 5 Reasons You Should Be Teaching Digital Citizenship by Paul Barnwell, Teacher of English & Digital Media Students buzzed about the latest uproar on Instagram.

Mixed Messages And Simple Truths On Monday, I heard Dylan William say that computers don’t make a difference to learning in the classroom. On Thursday, I heard Gerry White say that technology is responsible for a 12% increase in achievement. Both asserted that their statements were backed by research. Dylan William said on Monday (and Friday), “You are entitled to your own opinions. SID2015: Safer Internet Day 2015-Participation – Education: Digital CitizenShip, CyberSecurity by Gust MEES Image credit: Safer Internet Day (SID) is organised by Insafe in February of each year to promote safer and more responsible use of online technology and mobile phones, especially among children and young people across the world. Safer Internet Day 2015 will be celebrated on Tuesday 10 February 2015, with the strapline, once again, of ===> “Let’s create a better internet together” <=== following the success of last year’s campaign.

Teaching Screenagers:Character Education for the Digital Age Our current technological trajectory promises unfathomable, roller-coaster innovation with no braking system. While the ride is exciting, it moves so quickly that we typically don't have time to think about the possible unintended consequences that might accompany it. The result is that we find ourselves unable to effectively respond to hot-button issues like cyberbullying and sexting because they seem to come out of nowhere. Our challenge is to find ways to teach our children how to navigate the rapidly moving digital present, consciously and reflectively. How we meet this challenge depends on how we address the following fundamental question about teaching our digital-age children: Should we teach our children as though they have two lives, or one? The "two lives" perspective says that our students should live a traditional, digitally unplugged life at school and a second, digitally infused life outside school.

10 Interactive Lessons By Google On Digital Citizenship YouTube has a firm place in the current classroom. From Khan Academy’s videos to YouTube EDU and beyond, there’s a reason all these videos are finding a home in schools. In an effort to help keep the ball rolling, Google just launched a set of 10 interactive lessons designed to support teachers in educating students on digital citizenship. A topic obviously quite close to Google’s heart. Critical Search Skills Students Should Know There is a new digital divide on the horizon. It is not based around who has devices and who does not, but instead the new digital divide will be based around students who know how to effectively find and curate information and those who do not. Helene Blowers has come up with seven ideas about the new digital divide – four of them, the ones I felt related to searching, are listed below. The New Digital Divide In an age of information abundance learning to effectively search is one of the most important skills most teachers are NOT teaching. They assume students know how to conduct a search, and set them free on the internet to find information.

Infographic: Are You Revealing Too Much on Social Networks? Social-networking sites are a hacker's dream: a sometimes public online community where unsuspecting people post personal information. But what information can and should be posted on social networks? Cloud security firm Trend Micro examined popular social networks like Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Pinterest and found that most require identifying information like location, employment, birthday, and education. Tumblr is the only site that does not ask for any details, aside from username. According to Trend Micro, one in four Facebook users location-tag their posts each month, while 16 percent of Pinterest browsers offer their address.

Five-Minute Film Festival: Teaching Digital Citizenship "Digital citizenship" is an umbrella term that covers a whole host of important issues. Broadly, it's the guidelines for responsible, appropriate behavior when one is using technology. But specifically, it can cover anything from "netiquette" to cyberbullying; technology access and the digital divide; online safety and privacy; copyright, plagiarism, and digital law, and more. 10 Tips for Cyber Smartness and Safety I have recently started a series of posts here in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning featuring a set of interesting resources and tips for teachers to start a successful techy new school year. If you want to have a look at what we have already posted, check out this resource section. Today and as I was working on an article about cyber safety - which I will publish tomorrow-, I came across this handy guide outlining top ten tips for kids to stay safe online. The guide is created by AFP ( Australian Federal Police ) and is really ideal to use with our students in class. This could be a valuable material to add to the-start-of-a-new-school year resources we have been postig here . I am suggesting that you print it off and hand it out to your students.

Teaching Copyright As today's tech-savvy teens become increasingly involved with technology and the Internet for learning, work, civic engagement, and entertainment, it is vital to ensure that they understand their legal rights and responsibilities under copyright law and also how the law affects creativity and innovation. This curriculum is designed to give teachers a comprehensive set of tools to educate students about copyright while incorporating activities that exercise a variety of learning skills. Lesson topics include: the history of copyright law; the relationship between copyright and innovation; fair use and its relationship to remix culture; peer-to-peer file sharing; and the interests of the stakeholders that ultimately affect how copyright is interpreted by copyright owners, consumers, courts, lawmakers, and technology innovators. Unit Goals Educate students about copyright law, including the concepts of fair use, free speech, and the public domain.

Learn the Ropes on Digital Citizenship - For Kids & Teens...Sites Skip to main content Try Wikispaces Classroom now. Brand new from Wikispaces.

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