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How to move your lessons from good to outstanding

How to move your lessons from good to outstanding
Where would I be without Twitter? I have decided to elaborate on this AfL strategy, following this tweet from my @TeacherToolkit account on #ukedchat 3.11.11. My tweet said "#ukedchat Missed out tonight, look forward to reading ideas. My favourite T&L strategy at the moment is "Pose, Pause...Pounce, Bounce" #AfL". Firstly, this concept is not mine. So it is at this point, where I will be honourable and credit a colleague who I think has a money-spinning idea here. The fabulous Mrs Pam Fearnley delivered the session. What is it? It is a simple, yet sophisticated, AfL (Assessment for Learning) questioning technique to help teachers move from good-to-outstanding. Why is it useful? For many reasons. The strategy encouraged teachers to take risks and tease out the "learning" in class. How does it work? I have listed the four-part approach below with additional information that I hope explains the method. • Give the context of your approach to the class. This is the hard part. Explore! 1. 2. 3.

http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/2011/nov/17/lessons-good-to-outstanding-afl-questioning

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Questioning – what to look for Questioning This is my topic this year, I’m reading up on it and practicing it as much as I can, so I’m sharing this weeks thoughts on questioning with my readers. Questioning Bad Habits Asking too many questions too quicklyNot giving sufficient thinking timeOnly questioning the same studentsUsing only one style of questioning; who, what, when, where, how and not explain, justify, compare & evaluate for example. Tried and tested questioning strategies Questioning is most effective when it allows pupils to become fully involved in the learning process. While you are planning your lesson it is absolutely vital that you think about the types of questions you will be asking your pupils. You also need to be clear on what the intended outcomes of your questions/answer session should be. This advice on questioning techniques will help you plan your Q&A session effectively. Provide visual stimuli to support your question/answer sessions

Assessment for Learning The materials below explore some of my thinking about Assessment for Learning. Session 1: Assessing to learn and learning to assess: what should assessment look like in the languages classroom? The session offers a practical look at what research says about assessment, what Ofsted views as ‘outstanding’ assessment to support languages learning, and what students themselves want from assessment.

The 20%: Questioning This is Part One of a new 2-part blog exploring effective questioning in the classroom.In a previous post I talked about the Pareto Principle. I suggested we should focus on improving the 20% of classroom strategies which research shows yield 80% of results. In other words, we should focus on practising those interventions which most expedite student progress.I have already written about the role feedback can play.Now I shall turn my attention to questioning… Questions are bread-and-butter stuff for teachers, a way of extending students’ learning, fostering a sense of curiosity, and assessing the progress being made (or not) by our students. But not all questions are equal… In an article written as long ago as 1985 – in the days before the National Curriculum and Assessment for Learning, Jos Elstweet observed a lesson and made the following comments: I once witnessed a marvelous science lesson virtually go to ruins.

Questioning - Top Ten Strategies “Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is to not stop questioning.” – Albert Einstein Questioning is the very cornerstone of philosophy and education, ever since Socrates ( in our Western tradition) decided to annoy pretty much everyone by critiquing and harrying people with questions – it has been central to our development of thinking and our capacity to learn. Indeed, it is so integral to all that we do that it is often overlooked when developing pedagogy – but it as crucial to teaching as air is to breathing. We must ask: do we need to give questioning the thought and planning time something so essential to learning obviously deserves? Do we need to consciously teach students to ask good questions and not just answer them?

Make It Count: Providing Feedback as Formative Assessment Providing students with feedback on written work can, at times, feel like a burden. Dozens (perhaps even hundreds) of papers clutter your desk, and commenting on each is nearly impossible. Still, we know, both from our experiences and from research, that feedback is essential. The 37 Best Websites To Learn Something New — Life Learning Forget overpriced schools, long days in a crowded classroom, and pitifully poor results. These websites and apps cover myriads of science, art, and technology topics. They will teach you practically anything, from making hummus to building apps in node.js, most of them for free. There is absolutely no excuse for you not to master a new skill, expand your knowledge, or eventually boost your career. You can learn interactively at your own pace and in the comfort of your own home.

Pedagogy and practice: Teaching and learning in secondary schools – Unit 7: Questioning Publication date: Sep 2004 Ref: Educational Leadership:Using Assessments Thoughtfully:The Right Questions, The Right Way It is perhaps the most familiar of all classroom routines: A teacher asks the class a question, several students raise their hands, the teacher selects one of those with a hand raised, the student gives a response, the teacher evaluates the student's response, and the cycle begins again. Education researchers call it the standard classroom transaction model or just I-R-E (for initiation-response-evaluation). You will find this model played out it in the vast majority of classrooms in every country in the world.

Presentation Skills: 25 Useful Expressions you can use to make your Presentations in English flow In the last two weeks, I’ve had the pleasure of hosting and teaching a most delightful Swiss German client who is here on a two-week intensive Business English course. Andrea’s main objective during these two weeks has been to work on her presentation skills as her job now requires her to give more and more presentations in English. So we’ve spent the last two weeks working on such things as signposting language (for example, “to move on”; “to recap”; “to summarise”; “to turn to” and so on); presentation structure; using visuals and using the voice to make an impact (for example, pauses, sentence stress and intonation). One of the other things we’ve also worked on is creating a bank of common expressions that Andrea can learn in advance and use in any of her presentations. You can reduce the amount of thinking you have to do in a presentation by learning these expressions.

The 20%: Questioning This is Part One of a new 2-part blog exploring effective questioning in the classroom.In a previous post I talked about the Pareto Principle. I suggested we should focus on improving the 20% of classroom strategies which research shows yield 80% of results. In other words, we should focus on practising those interventions which most expedite student progress.I have already written about the role feedback can play.Now I shall turn my attention to questioning… Questions are bread-and-butter stuff for teachers, a way of extending students’ learning, fostering a sense of curiosity, and assessing the progress being made (or not) by our students. But not all questions are equal…

Feedback for Thinking: Working for the Answer We run the risk of giving the wrong kind of feedback for students, and it's not because we are bad people. We love our students. We want them to be successful, and sometimes these desires can actually get in the way of a student truly learning.

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