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Nineteen Eighty-Four

Nineteen Eighty-Four
History and title[edit] A 1947 draft manuscript of the first page of Nineteen Eighty-Four, showing the editorial development. The Last Man in Europe was an early title for the novel but in a letter dated 22 October 1948 to his publisher Fredric Warburg, eight months before publication, Orwell wrote about hesitating between The Last Man in Europe and Nineteen Eighty-Four.[14] Warburg suggested changing the main title to a more commercial one.[15] Copyright status[edit] The novel will be in the public domain in the European Union and Russia in 2021 and in the United States in 2044.[21] It is already in the public domain in Canada;[22] South Africa,[23] Argentina[24] Australia,[25] and Oman.[26] Background[edit] The banner of the Party in the 1984 film adaptation of the book (I) the upper-class Inner Party, the elite ruling minority, who make up 2% of the population. As the government, the Party controls the population with four ministries: Plot[edit] Characters[edit] Principal characters[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nineteen_Eighty-Four

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Orwell's 1984 (audiobook) Reviewer:plebian poblano - favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite - December 13, 2015 Subject: Doubleplusgood 1984 is doubleplusgood Reviewer:K10vvn - favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite - July 3, 2015 Subject: Great recording The book is great. I'm surprised to see it called "poisonous". The Amber Spyglass The Amber Spyglass is the third and final novel in the His Dark Materials series, written by English author Philip Pullman, and published in 2000. The Amber Spyglass won the 2001 Whitbread Book of the Year award, a British literature award, making it the first children's novel to receive the honour.[1] It was named Children's Book of the Year at the 2001 British Book Awards, and was also longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, again the first time this had happened to a children's book.[2] Plot[edit]

The Best Year in Science Fiction: 1982 @Moses Quetzalcoatl Bratrud: Generations is... okay. That's all I have to say on that matter. I also think TVH is overrated (far, far too preachy in retrospect), though I do agree it's one of the best ones. Flagged Moral nihilism Moral nihilism (also known as ethical nihilism) is the meta-ethical view that nothing is intrinsically moral or immoral. For example, a moral nihilist would say that killing someone, for whatever reason, is neither inherently right nor inherently wrong. Moral nihilists consider morality to be constructed, a complex set of rules and recommendations that may give a psychological, social, or economical advantage to its adherents, but is otherwise without universal or even relative truth in any sense.[1] Moral nihilism is distinct from moral relativism, which does allow for moral statements to be true or false in a non-objective sense, but does not assign any static truth-values to moral statements, and of course moral universalism, which holds moral statements to be objectively true or false.

Orwell's 1984 (etext) Nineteen Eighty-four, by George Orwell Table of Contents Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 The Subtle Knife Plot summary[edit] Lyra revisits Dr. Malone the next day, but after accepting a ride from the well-dressed Sir Charles Latrom, she discovers that Sir Charles has stolen her alethiometer and she asks Will to help her retrieve it. When Lyra and Will confront Sir Charles, he readily admits that he has stolen the alethiometer and blackmails the pair into retrieving a mysterious knife from Cittàgazze in exchange for its return. They defeat the youth who holds the knife but Will receives a distinctive wound – the loss of two fingers – which the knife's true guardian explains as the sign that he is now the next true guardian of the Subtle Knife, a tool that cuts windows between worlds and cuts easily through anything – both material and spiritual. He explains further that this world is haunted by soul-eating Spectres, which prey on older children and adults but are invisible to children of their age, and that the knife must not fall into Sir Charles' hands.

Metropolis (1927 film) Metropolis is a 1927 German expressionist epic science fiction drama film directed by Fritz Lang. The film was written by Lang and his wife Thea von Harbou, and starred Brigitte Helm, Gustav Fröhlich, Alfred Abel and Rudolf Klein-Rogge. A silent film, it was produced by Erich Pommer in the Babelsberg Studios by Universum Film A.G.. Flowers for Algernon Flowers for Algernon is a science fiction short story and subsequent novel written by Daniel Keyes. The short story, written in 1958 and first published in the April 1959 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1960.[2] The novel was published in 1966 and was joint winner of that year's Nebula Award for Best Novel (with Babel-17).[3] The eponymous Algernon is a laboratory mouse who has undergone surgery to increase his intelligence by artificial means.

The Handmaid's Tale (wiki) The Handmaid's Tale won the 1985 Governor General's Award and the first Arthur C. Clarke Award in 1987; it was also nominated for the 1986 Nebula Award, the 1986 Booker Prize, and the 1987 Prometheus Award. It has been adapted for the cinema, radio, opera, and stage. Plot summary[edit] Supernatural Fiction Supernatural fiction (properly, "supernaturalist fiction"[1]) is a literary genre exploiting or requiring as plot devices or themes some contradictions of the commonplace natural world and materialist assumptions about it. In its broadest definition, supernatural fiction includes examples of weird fiction, horror fiction, fantasy fiction, and such sub-genres as vampire literature and the ghost story. Elements of supernatural fiction can be found in writing from genres such as science fiction. Amongst academics, readers and collectors, however, supernatural fiction is often classed as a discrete genre defined by the elimination of "horror", "fantasy" and elements important to other genres.[1] The one genre supernatural fiction appears to embrace in its entirety is the traditional ghost story.[2] In the twentieth century, supernatural fiction became associated with psychological fiction.

Tears in rain monologue "c-beam" redirects here. For steel beams with a c-shaped cross-section, see structural channel. Roy Batty, as played by Rutger Hauer after the "Tears in Rain" monologue in Blade Runner. "Tears in Rain" is the final monologue of the Ridley Scott film Blade Runner, delivered by the replicant Roy Batty, portrayed by Rutger Hauer. The final form, altered from the scripted lines and much improvised by Hauer on the eve of filming,[1][2] has entered popular culture as "perhaps the most moving death soliloquy in cinematic history"[3] and is an often quoted piece of science fiction writing.[4] Script and improvisation[edit]

Grow by Jim Stengel · OverDrive: eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries Great businesses naturally have many things in common: superbly designed products and services, knockout customer experiences, sustained excellence at execution, outstanding talent and teamwork, and great leadership. But there's also something else, an X factor that keeps renewing and strengthening great businesses through good times and bad. Based on almost ten years of empirical research involving 50,000 companies, Jim Stengel, former director of marketing at Procter & Gamble, shows how the world's 50 best businesses - as diverse as Apple, Red Bull, Pampers and Petrobras - have a cause and effect relationship between financial performance and their ability to connect with fundamental human emotions, hopes, values and greater purposes.

The Handmaid s Tale (etext) A chair, a table, a lamp. Above, on the white ceiling, a relief ornament in the shape of a wreath, and in the center of it a blank space, plastered over, like the place in a face where the eye has been taken out. There must have been a chandelier, once. They've removed anything you could tie a rope to. A window, two white curtains. Under the window, a window seat with a little cushion.

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