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Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read

Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read
Click above to view full image! Any book lover can tell you: diving into a great novel is an immersive experience that can make your brain come alive with imagery and emotions and even turn on your senses. It sounds romantic, but there’s real, hard evidence that supports these things happening to your brain when you read books. In reading, we can actually physically change our brain structure, become more empathetic, and even trick our brains into thinking we’ve experienced what we’ve only read in novels.We make photos in our minds, even without being prompted:Reading books and other materials with vivid imagery is not only fun, it also allows us to create worlds in our own minds. But did you know that this happens even if you don’t mean it to? Researchers have found that visual imagery is simply automatic. Related:  Why Reading Matters

6 Scaffolding Strategies to Use with Your Students What’s the opposite of scaffolding a lesson? Saying to students, “Read this nine-page science article, write a detailed essay on the topic it explores, and turn it in by Wednesday.” Yikes! No safety net, no parachute—they’re just left to their own devices. Let’s start by agreeing that scaffolding a lesson and differentiating instruction are two different things. Simply put, scaffolding is what you do first with kids. Scaffolding and differentiation do have something in common, though. So let’s get to some scaffolding strategies you may or may not have tried yet. 1. How many of us say that we learn best by seeing something rather than hearing about it? Try a fishbowl activity, where a small group in the center is circled by the rest of the class; the group in the middle, or fishbowl, engages in an activity, modeling how it’s done for the larger group. 2. 3. All learners need time to process new ideas and information. 4. 5. 6.

Piccolo Picture Books USA Why To Read: 10 Reasons Why You Should Read More What Are The Benefits Of Reading? We started WhytoRead.com to encourage you to read more and to introduce you to new books that will benefit you. The benefits of reading are not limited to 10 but the top reasons in this article are the most powerful. By the time you’ve read this post, you should be encouraged to pick up that book you’ve been meaning to finish so you can start the next one. In terms of fiction or non-fiction, there are endless stories that can both broaden your understanding of the world or help you get through a sticking point in your life. Those who read have been known to have more finely-tuned brains than those who prefer more passive activities, so anyone hoping to improve their mind both psychologically and cognitively might want to think about taking up the habit of regular reading. 1. Although it doesn’t always make you a better communicator, those who read tend to have a more varied range of words to express how they feel and to get their point across. 2. 3. 4.

How Good Books Can Change You Ever read a book that's changed your life? You're not imagining it -- the process of digesting a character or a series of events actually turns you into a different person. Summer's here and time for summer reading at the beach, in a hammock or on the porch. Books are great for passing the time on lazy summer afternoons. And according to Ohio State researchers, the books you read from childhood on can also change who you are. They do this by a process the researchers called experience taking. Students who read a first person story about a voter from their own university also ended up much more likely to vote (65 percent) than those who read a first person story about a voter from another university (29 percent). It's not like reading about Superman and then thinking that you can fly. In different experiments, the researchers found that experience taking can change the likelihood of a person voting and also change their attitude about people of different race or sexual orientation.

Comparing and Contrasting with the Three Little Pigs We keep hoping for snow here in middle Tennessee. We got so close yesterday, but nothing! Boo! While wishing for snow last week, our comprehension skill focus was on comparing and contrasting. RL 2.9 Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures. I decided to teach this using The Three Little Pigs! I made a little packet similar to my other reading comprehension packets for my littles to learn how to compare and contrast more than one version of the same story. I divided my class into 4 groups. Each day they filled out a story map over the book we read which I made into little booklets. As we read them, I would make whole group Venn Diagrams to show them how to compare and contrast the different versions. We also discussed how the character of the wolf was portrayed differently in The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs and The Three Pigs. You can find all of these activities and more in my packet below.

A Visual Timeline of the Future Based on Famous Fiction By Maria Popova The past has a long history of imagining the future, and humanity has an equally long history of mapping time. Several months ago, I shared a link to a timeline of future events as predicted by famous novels. Giorgia was recently visiting and after she shared the story, I asked her to create an English edition of the exquisite timeline exclusively for Brain Pickings, which she generously did: (Click image for hi-res version) Giorgia explains: The visualization is built on a main horizontal axis depicting a distorted time-line of events (in fact we put them regularly, in sequence), starting our future-timeline in 2012. Here are a few progress sketches for a fascinating glimpse of her process: See more of Giorgia’s wonderful work on her site, then imbibe some visualization lessons from the world’s top information designers and data artists.

Teach the Seven Strategies of Highly Effective Readers By: Elaine K. McEwan To improve students' reading comprehension, teachers should introduce the seven cognitive strategies of effective readers: activating, inferring, monitoring-clarifying, questioning, searching-selecting, summarizing, and visualizing-organizing. This article includes definitions of the seven strategies and a lesson-plan template for teaching each one. To assume that one can simply have students memorize and routinely execute a set of strategies is to misconceive the nature of strategic processing or executive control. If the struggling readers in your content classroom routinely miss the point when "reading" content text, consider teaching them one or more of the seven cognitive strategies of highly effective readers. Struggling students often mistakenly believe they are reading when they are actually engaged in what researchers call mindless reading (Schooler, Reichle, & Halpern, 2004), zoning out while staring at the printed page. Instructional aids References

Psychologists Discover How People Subconsciously Become Their Favorite Fictional Characters Psychologists have discovered that while reading a book or story, people are prone to subconsciously adopt their behavior, thoughts, beliefs and internal responses to that of fictional characters as if they were their own. Experts have dubbed this subconscious phenomenon ‘experience-taking,’ where people actually change their own behaviors and thoughts to match those of a fictional character that they can identify with. Researcher from the Ohio State University conducted a series of six different experiments on about 500 participants, reporting in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, found that in the right situations, ‘experience-taking,’ may lead to temporary real world changes in the lives of readers. They found that stories written in the first-person can temporarily transform the way readers view the world, themselves and other social groups. "Experience-taking is much more immersive -- you've replaced yourself with the other," Libby said in a statement.

25 Reading Strategies That Work In Every Content Area 25 Reading Strategies That Work In Every Content Area Reading is reading. By understanding that letters make sounds, we can blend those sounds together to make whole sounds that symbolize meaning we can all exchange with one another. Without getting too Platonic about it all, reading doesn’t change simply because you’re reading a text from another content area. Science content can often by full of jargon, research citations, and odd text features. Social Studies content can be an interesting mix of itemized information, and traditional paragraphs/imagery. Literature? This all makes reading strategies somewhat content area specific. But if you’d like to start with a basic set of strategies, you could do worse than the elegant graphic above from wiki-teacher.com. For related reading, see 50 of the best reading comprehension apps, different ways your school can promote literacy, or how reading in the 21st century is different. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. To the above list, we’d add:

6 Interactive Storytelling Apps For Younger Students Getting younger students to tell stories can promote a variety of different language arts skills in a way that is a lot more fun than doing grammar drills. From learning the parts of speech and sentence and paragraph structure to vocabulary, there is a lot of hidden teaching material in storytelling, which interactive storytelling apps can enhance. Since we all know that kids LOVE to tell stories (check out this blog post by a teacher who had to limit how many stories each student could tell per day), there is a lot of potential in this activity. Storia Storia is a free app that is basically an eReader for kids. StoryKit StoryKit is an app that allows users to create electronic storybooks that can include text, illustrations, photographs, and sound clips. StoryPark StoryPark is a web-based tool that allows users to sign up for a free account, and then create and share stories with other users of their choosing (stories are otherwise private). I Tell A Story Toontastic Scribble Press

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