background preloader

KS2 Bitesize Science - Forces in action : Play

KS2 Bitesize Science - Forces in action : Play
Related:  Forces and Motionelizabethgerber

Roller Coaster Game Welcome to the death defying Funderstanding Roller Coaster! This simulator is designed for people who want to design their own thrilling coaster and educators who want to use a cool activity to simulate the application of physics by using an exciting interactive tool and access to a wonderful reference source. It is your mission to become a roller coaster designer so that you can achieve maximum thrills and chills without crashing or flying off the track (unless that’s how you like your coaster to work!). If you accept this mission you must decide on a number of factors. You are responsible for setting the controls for the height of hill #1, hill #2, the size of the loop, the initial speed of the coaster, its mass, the gravity at work and the amount of friction on the track. This great educational online tool offers an interactive way for kids to play a roller coaster game, and learn while doing it. Finally, some fun online education kids! If you need help, click on the ‘?

Interactive General Science Lessons | Interactive Science Teacher Solid Lessons Most importantly, every lesson is classroom-tested. Each science lesson stays focused on, and builds around, standards that students are expected to understand. Strong Teacher Support I feel that since you’re the one presenting the lesson, it’s crucial that you understand it and be fully prepared. PowerPoints Most lessons include a custom-made PowerPoint that will guide you and your students through the lesson. Numbers Well over 100 Interactive Science Lessons, hundreds of clear and concise PowerPoint slides, 50 hours of video instruction for you, and hundreds of pictures and drawings. Let me add one more number- 10x. Extra Goodies Many lessons include “Accessories” that you can choose to customize your lessons with, additional homework assignments, answer keys, quizzes and tests, and other suggested resources.

KS2 Bitesize Science - Friction : Play Friction is a force between two surfaces that are sliding, or trying to slide, across each other. For example, when you try to push a book along the floor, friction makes this difficult. Friction always works in the direction opposite to the direction in which the object is moving, or trying to move. Friction always slows a moving object down. The amount of friction depends on the materials from which the two surfaces are made. Friction can be a useful force because it prevents our shoes slipping on the pavement when we walk and stops car tyres skidding on the road. Sometimes we want to reduce friction. Galileo Drops the Ball - Virtual Experiment In around 1590 Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) climbed up the Leaning Tower of Pisa and dropped some balls to the ground. Two balls of different masses, but of similar shape and density that were released together hit the ground at the same time. Until then it was commonly believed that heavy things fall faster than light things. If you drop a brick and a feather at the same time the brick will probably hit the ground first. Galileo’s discovery is important in understanding how parachutes work. Click on the image to the left to try Galileo’s experiment for yourself. Find out more about Galileo Galilei.

Geologic Time Initially compiled by Laurie Cantwell, Montana State University This section highlights animations, images, interactive graphics and videos used to teach the concept of geologic time in an introductory geology course. Visualizations cover the specific topics of earth history, relative age dating and life through geologic time. Click here to browse the complete set of Visualization Collections. Earth History ChronoZoom (more info) ChronoZoom is a free, open source interactive timeline tool for learning about all kinds of history, stretching back all 13.7 billion years to the Big Bang. Graphical Representation of Geologic Time (more info) An illustration of the 4.5 billion year old Earth's time scale shown as a spiral with pictorial representations of both marine and terrestrial life. Observe an animation showing growth of a continent. Continental Drift (more info) Animation and interactive timeline illustrating continental drift from the Precambrian to Cenozoic. Changes of life on Earth

Force and Motion Facts Motion makes the world go 'round. Motion makes the moon go 'round too. In fact, motion makes lots of things go. When we think of motion we often think of cars, bicycles, kids running, basketballs bouncing and airplanes flying. What is Force? Force is just a fancy word for pushing or pulling. These two forces act at a distance and do not require direct contact between the objects to function. See D4K's site on Gravity. Magnetism produces a force that can either pull opposite ends of two magnets together or push the matching ends apart. Types Of Contact Forces There are 6 kinds of forces which act on objects when they come into contact with one another. Let's investigate how these forces can be seen in our lives. Normal Force A book resting on a table has the force of gravity pulling it toward the Earth. Experiment with this concept by trying one of these paper bridge experiments from ZOOM or Building Big! Applied Force Frictional Force Tension Force Spring Force Resisting Forces What is Inertia?

Forms of Energy: Motion, Heat, Light, Sound What forms of energy is Raul using to move his LEGO car? When he was a teenager in Romania, Raul Oaida became obsessed with building things: a jet-engine bike, a tiny spaceship, a LEGO car that runs on air. Why? Well, why not? You can see more cool stories about energy at The Adaptors website. Like video and audio? Energy comes in two basic forms: potential and kinetic Potential Energy is any type of stored energy. Kinetic Energy is found in movement. Energy can shift between forms, but it is never destroyed or created. A car transforms the potential energy trapped in gasoline into various types of energy that help the wheels turn and get the car to move. Power plants transform one form of energy into a very useful form, electricity. These transformations are hardly perfect. Forms of Potential Energy Systems can increase gravitational energy as mass moves away from the center of Earth or other objects that are large enough to generate significant gravity (our sun, the planets and stars).

Motion: Forces Forces are a big part of physics. Physicists devote a lot of time to the study of forces that are found everywhere in the universe. The forces could be big, such as the pull of a star on a planet. The forces could also be very small, such as the pull of a nucleus on an electron. Forces are acting everywhere in the universe at all times. Let's look at the forces acting on that soccer ball before you kicked it. If there is more than one force acting on an object, the forces can be added up if they act in the same direction, or subtracted if they act in opposition. There is one totally important formula when it comes to forces, F = ma. Or search the sites for a specific topic. Virtual Earthquake - An Introduction What's an earthquake? Earthquakes occur because of a sudden release of stored energy. This energy has built up over long periods of time as a result of tectonic forces within the earth. Most earthquakes take place along faults in the upper 25 miles of the earth's surface when one side rapidly moves relative to the other side of the fault. This sudden motion causes shock waves (seismic waves) to radiate from their point of origin called the focus and travel through the earth. What are earthquake (Seismic) Waves? A seismic wave is simply a means of transferring energy from one spot to another within the earth. The speed of an earthquake wave is not constant but varies with many factors. What's a Seismogram? Note well: This seismogram is a simulation. How is an Earthquake's Epicenter Located? In order to locate the epicenter of an earthquake you will need to examine its seismograms as recorded by three different seismic stations.

Edheads - Activate Your Mind!

Related: