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Digicentral - Digital citizenship

Digicentral - Digital citizenship
Related:  Digital CitizenshipDigital CitizenshipVideos

scope_and_sequence_110212.pdf How To Tackle Digital Citizenship During The First 5 Days Of School Digital citizenship is not a one time discussion. It is an ongoing process that needs to be taught to all grade levels and to all stakeholders. The problem is that things are changing so rapidly that it is difficult for everyone to keep up to date with the trends. Everyone has to be educated and develop an understanding of the role digital citizenship plays in our everyday lives. There is so much that goes into being a digital citizen; from taking photos of others to knowing when it is appropriate to share something online. Our students are like cowboys living in the wild wild west. Day One: Create An Acceptable Use Policy WITH Your Students – Give Them a Voice Every September we pass out the obligatory acceptable use policies with little thought to what they include. For this discussion, think about digital citizenship in general, at school, at home and in transit. Who is responsible for the technology or the device – what does that entail? Day Two:Discuss “Online Privacy”

Copyright and Creative Commons Explained by Common Craft Julia’s dream is to make a living as a photographer. In this dream, she takes amazing photos, people buy them, and their purchases fund her future work. But it’s not that simple. Julia wants to publish some of her photos to help spread the word, but she’s concerned because photos are easy to copy. So she does some research and learns that in the U.S., as with other countries, we have laws that give creators of materials like books, images, movies, artwork and music a way to own and protect their creations. And she’s surprised to find that when she creates photos, she owns the copyright to them automatically, without taking any other action. She likes being covered by copyright law, but it limits her exposure, because her permission is required for sharing a photo. Her research leads her to Creative Commons, which is a set of licenses that she can use to make her copyrighted photos free for sharing. Across the country, Kelly needs a travel photo for his magazine article.

Cybersafety educational resources for teachers and schools: Cybersmart Professional development The Cybersmart Outreach program has been in high demand since its introduction, with many schools booking for repeat presentations. Over 2015 the ACMA will be placing a high priority on visiting those schools who have already registered, but have not yet received, one of our presentations. For this reason, from Find out more about our expanding virtual classroom program, covering issues such as cyberbullying and how to stay safe and secure online. #GameOn Aimed at upper primary / lower secondary students, #GameOn is a video series following the online experiences of a group friends. Topics covered include: Cyberbullying Excessive gaming Sharing passwords Free downloads Online friends

Upper primary What are 10-11 year olds doing online Understanding what students are doing online is a valuable starting point for teaching cybersafety. This series of videos combined with the Cybercitizen profiles provide teachers with a comprehensive view of their students’ online lives. Find out what your students are doing online » Multimedia Resources Web-based teaching resources available for use by teachers. Downloadable Lesson plans and Units of work These activities are designed to build a range of skills, knowledge and behaviours in students that will help to keep them safe online. Units of work—Digital media literacy Units of work—Peer and personal safety

Digital Literacy & Citizenship Classroom Curriculum NEW! Learn the fundamentals of digital citizenship through choose-your-own-adventure interactive experiences DIGITAL COMPASS - Where are you headed? The only educational game that gives kids the freedom to explore how decisions made in their digital lives can impact their relationships and future. Bring a blended-learning approach to teaching digital citizenship DIGITAL BYTES teaches teens digital citizenship through student-directed, media-rich activities that tackle real-world dilemmas. Measure Student Learning with Interactive Assessments We offer THREE WAYS to assess student learning about digital literacy and citizenship. Engage Students with Digital Passport™ Introduce students, grades 3-5, to DIGITAL PASSPORT™, Common Sense Education’s award-winning suite of engaging videos, fun games, and collaborative classroom activities that address key issues facing kids in today's digital world. Dive into our Toolkits Our curricular TOOLKITS put topical resources at your fingertips.

Digital Citizenship Flashcards Another academic year is here and with it comes new clothes, lessons, and of course, new technologies. But are your child's digital citizenship skills back-to-school ready? If not, don't worry. To help them make the grade, download these flashcards to help them boost their online know-how. You can reference just one, or download, print, and put together an entire flashcard deck to work through...check below for a DIY version! Want to start a conversation about all of the above?

Nine Elements Nine Themes of Digital Citizenship Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. 1. Digital Access: full electronic participation in society. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Respect, Educate and Protect (REPs) These elements have also been organized under the principles of respect, educate and protect. Respect Your Self/Respect Others - Etiquette - Access - Law Educate Your Self/Connect with Others - Literacy - Communication - Commerce Protect Your Self/Protect Others -Rights and Responsibility - Safety (Security) - Health and Welfare If this was to be taught beginning at the kindergarten level it would follow this pattern: Repetition 1 (kindergarten to second grade) Respect Your Self/Respect Others Digital Etiquette Educate Your Self/Connect with OthersDigital Literacy Protect Your Self/Protect Others Digital Rights and Responsibility Repetition 2 (third to fifth grade) Respect Your Self/Respect Others Digital Access

How to Create Social Media Guidelines for Your School Produced in collaboration with Facebook. Social media is fast becoming as ubiquitous as the air we breathe. In recent months, many schools and districts around the country have taken steps to create social media policies and guidelines for their students and staff. In my work with several districts to draft these documents, I have seen many approaches that work well, and some that don't. That said, there is no silver bullet for administrators; every school, district, and state has a different set of circumstances. With that in mind, here are some steps that will help you determine the best approach for your own community. 2. This team should include educators who use social media in the classroom and those who do not. This team should be open and transparent in all their conversations and decision making, and be clear about their shared goal. Questions for ReflectionDoes everyone on the team share the same goal?

Design Thinking approach to Digital Citizenship Design Thinking is a problem solving methodology used by people all over the world to come up with new ideas. Recently there has been a lot of discussion about how to integrate this approach into education. This summer I took two Online courses to learn more about the process. I am very interested in ways to use this approach in my own teaching. This fall I decided to apply this approach to my 7th grade Digital Citizenship unit which focuses on cyberbullying. It worked really well. Here is my lesson plan. Cyberbullying Design Thinking Activity (for 7th graders) Empathize Present the idea “How might we end Cyberbullying?” Define: Students share with the class what they learned about cyberbullying from their research. Ideate: Each group on chart paper brainstorms 100 ideas for solutions in 15 minutes.Post chart paper and all students look at all solutions.Each student has 5 post it notes and votes on the top 5 ideas they see (different color for each group).Groups pick one idea to work on.

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