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Monotasking Is The New Multitasking

Monotasking Is The New Multitasking
We all know multitasking is inefficient. A classic 2007 study of Microsoft workers found that when they responded to email or instant messaging alerts, it took them, on average, nearly 10 minutes to deal with their inboxes or messages, and another 10-15 minutes to really get back into their original tasks. That means that a mere three distractions per hour can preclude you from getting anything else done. Then there’s the relationship “inefficiency” that comes from multitasking. You can spend hours rebuilding the good will torched by a single glance at your phone during an inopportune time. We know this, yet we keep doing it. No human activity is immune. Fortunately, there are ways to learn to focus. Live right There are many reasons to exercise, hydrate, and get enough sleep--and the ability to fight distractions is one of them. Tie yourself to the mast To resist the original siren song, Odysseus bound himself to his ship so he couldn’t pursue these tempting creatures. Play offense Plan

http://www.fastcompany.com/3015251/monotasking-is-the-new-multitasking

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Multi-taskers are Bad At It People who multitask all the time may be the worst at doing two things at once, new research suggests. The findings, based on performances and self-evaluations by about 275 undergraduate students, suggest many people multitask not out of a desire to boost productivity, but because they are easily distracted and can't focus on one activity. And those people turn out to be the worst at juggling different things, the researchers said. "From a public safety perspective, it's a little alarming that the people who report using a cellphone while driving the most are the persons who are the worst at multitasking," said study co-author David Sanbonmatsu, a psychologist at the University of Utah. The findings were published today (Jan. 23) in the journal PLoS One.

The Magic of Doing One Thing at a Time - Tony Schwartz by Tony Schwartz | 8:53 AM March 14, 2012 Why is it that between 25% and 50% of people report feeling overwhelmed or burned out at work? It’s not just the number of hours we’re working, but also the fact that we spend too many continuous hours juggling too many things at the same time. What we’ve lost, above all, are stopping points, finish lines and boundaries. Script Export Office 365 User Last Logon Date to CSV File Verified on the following platforms This script is tested on these platforms by the author. It is likely to work on other platforms as well. If you try it and find that it works on another platform, please add a note to the script discussion to let others know. Disclaimer The sample scripts are not supported under any Microsoft standard support program or service.

Time Management Tips: How to Find the Right Mindset to Succeed With Time Management For the past several years I have worked with time management techniques such as lists, prioritization, planning and so on. But it wasn’t until I adopted a Quadrant 2 mindset that I really started seeing results. How To Waste Time Properly - Issue 7: Waste Ever since Frederick Winslow Taylor timed the exact number of seconds that Bethlehem Steel workers took to push shovels into a load of iron ore and then draw them out, maximizing time efficiency has been a holy grail of the American workplace. But psychologists and neuroscientists are showing us the limits of this attitude: Wasting time, they say, can make you more creative. Even seemingly meaningless activities such as watching cat videos on YouTube may help you solve math problems.

6 Things The Most Productive People Do Every Day Ever feel like you’re just not getting enough done? Know how many days per week you’re actually productive? About 3: Collaborative Tools Skip to main content Get your Wikispaces Classroom now: the easiest way to manage your class. guest Join | Help | Sign In cooltoolsforschools Home GTD Cheatsheet – An Intro on the GTD system The system created by David Allen in his popular book Getting Things Done focuses on freeing up your mind’s RAM (or resources). The GTD system simply takes all or our mental and physical “stuff” in our lives and organizes it into a system where we can easily: 1) Act on it or

The Super Simple Phone Hack That Will Transform Your Productivity A while back, my cofounder Leo gave me an interesting suggestion: He said I should try disabling all notifications on my iPhone. I find this suggestion especially interesting because it is one that goes against the normal phone setup. It’s so usual to stick to how things are, and with iPhone apps the easiest thing to do is to “allow” all those notifications. It seems almost odd to even consider doing things any other way. I chose to go along with Leo’s suggestion, although I was admittedly quite skeptical that it would change much.

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