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Golden Age

Golden Age
There are analogous concepts in the religious and philosophical traditions of the South Asian subcontinent. For example, the Vedic or ancient Hindu culture saw history as cyclical, composed of yugas with alternating Dark and Golden Ages. The Kali yuga (Iron Age), Dwapara (Bronze Age), Treta yuga (Silver Age) and Satya yuga (Golden Age) correspond to the four Greek ages. The Golden Age in Europe: Greece[edit] [Men] lived like gods without sorrow of heart, remote and free from toil and grief: miserable age rested not on them; but with legs and arms never failing they made merry with feasting beyond the reach of all devils. Plato in his Cratylus referred to an age of golden men and also expounded at some length on Ages of Man from Hesiod's Works and Days. Arcadia[edit] The Golden Age in Rome: Virgil and Ovid[edit] Ultima Cumaei venit iam carminis aetas; magnus ab integro saeclorum nascitur ordo: iam redit et Virgo, redeunt Saturnia regna; iam nova progenies caelo demittitur alto. Related:  Things that make me go hmmmwikipedia

HYGINUS, ASTRONOMICA 2 This sign Aratus and many others have called Pegasus, offspring of Neptune and the Gorgon Medusa, who on Helicon, a mountain of Boeotia, opened up a spring by striking the rock with his hoof. From him the spring is called Hippocrene. Others say that at the time Bellerophon came to visit Proetus, son of Abas and king of the Argives, Antia, the king’s wife, smitten with love for the guest, begged to visit him, promising him her husband’s kingdom. Euripides in his Melanippe, says that Melanippe, daughter of Chiron the Centaur, was once called Thetis. This constellation, which has three angles like the Greek letter Delta, is so named for that reason. Mercury is thought to have placed it above the head of Aries, so that the dimness of Aries might be marked by its brightness, wherever it should be, and that it should form the first letter in the name of Jove (in Greek, Dis). Others, say that three angles were put there because the gods divided the universe into three parts. Whale.

Ages of Man The Ages of Man are the stages of human existence on the Earth according to Greek mythology. Both Hesiod and Ovid offered accounts of the successive ages of humanity, which tend to progress from an original, long-gone age in which humans enjoyed a nearly divine existence to the current age of the writer, in which humans are beset by innumerable pains and evils. In the two accounts that survive from ancient Greece and Rome, this degradation of the human condition over time is indicated symbolically with metals of successively decreasing value. Hesiod's Five Ages[edit] Lucas Cranach the Elder, The Silver Age The first extant account of the successive ages of humanity comes from the Greek poet Hesiod's Works and Days (lines 109–201). Ovid's Four Ages[edit] The Roman poet Ovid (1st century BC – 1st century AD) tells a similar myth of Four Ages in Book 1.89–150 of the Metamorphoses. Ovid emphasizes the justice and peace that defined the Golden Age. Historicity of the Ages[edit] See also[edit]

Achilles In Greek mythology, Achilles (/əˈkɪliːz/; Ancient Greek: Ἀχιλλεύς, Akhilleus, pronounced [akʰillěws]) was a Greek hero of the Trojan War and the central character and greatest warrior of Homer's Iliad. Achilles was said to be a demigod; his mother was the nymph Thetis, and his father, Peleus, was the king of the Myrmidons. Etymology[edit] Achilles' name can be analyzed as a combination of ἄχος (akhos) "grief" and λαός (Laos) "a people, tribe, nation, etc." In other words, Achilles is an embodiment of the grief of the people, grief being a theme raised numerous times in the Iliad (frequently by Achilles). The name Achilleus was a common and attested name among the Greeks soon after the 7th century BC.[1] It was also turned into the female form Ἀχιλλεία (Achilleía) attested in Attica in the 4th century BC (IG II² 1617) and, in the form Achillia, on a stele in Halicarnassus as the name of a female gladiator fighting an "Amazon". Birth[edit] Achilles in the Trojan War[edit] Telephus[edit]

Sphinx Perhaps the first sphinx, Queen Hetepheres II from the fourth dynasty (Cairo Museum) A sphinx (Greek: Σφίγξ /sphinx/. Bœotian: Φίξ /Phix) is a mythical creature with, as a minimum, the body of a lion and a human head. In Greek tradition, it has the haunches of a lion, sometimes with the wings of a great bird, and the face of a human. It is mythicised as treacherous and merciless. In European decorative art, the sphinx enjoyed a major revival during the Renaissance. Generally the role of sphinxes is associated with architectural structures such as royal tombs or religious temples. Back of Sphinx, Giza Egypt Egyptian sphinxes[edit] The largest and most famous sphinx is the Great Sphinx of Giza, situated at the Giza Plateau adjacent to the Great Pyramids of Giza on the west bank of the Nile River and facing due east ( WikiMiniAtlas 29°58′31″N 31°08′15″E / 29.97528°N 31.13750°E / 29.97528; 31.13750). Greek traditions[edit] The Riddle of the Sphinx[edit] Burmese depiction of the Manussiha

Poland Poland i/ˈpoʊlənd/ (Polish: Polska), officially the Republic of Poland (Polish: Rzeczpospolita Polska), is a country in Central Europe, bordered by Germany to the west; the Czech Republic and Slovakia to the south; Ukraine, Belarus to the east; and the Baltic Sea and Kaliningrad Oblast (a Russian exclave) and Lithuania to the north. The total area of Poland is 312,679 square kilometres (120,726 sq mi),[7] making it the 69th largest country in the world and the 9th largest in Europe. With a population of over 38.5 million people,[7] Poland is the 34th most populous country in the world,[9] the sixth most populous member of the European Union, and the most populous post-communist member of the European Union. Two decades later, in September 1939, World War II started with the invasions of Poland by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union (as part of the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact). Etymology The origin of the name Polanie itself is uncertain. History Prehistory Piast dynasty Jagiellon dynasty

Soulmate vs twin flame - Intimate Connections - tribe.net let me just state that Soul Mates and Twin Souls ...may or may not have have anything to do with Love or Romance With that said let me share with you ... what we all dream of NOTE: when i think of soul mates,(let's think in astrological terms) i tend to think of it like say the Sun conjunct to someones moon strong easy familar connection ... "it feels good" Twin flames i see as opposites i.e oppositions... strong attraction but an UNDERSTANDING is the key Article: I believe that many people have difficulty embracing the idea of past lives or in reincarnation. I believe that a Soul Mate or Twin Flame can be a man or a woman....it makes no difference. What is all this about soulmate love connection Or Twin Flames, can I actually have one? Yes, there are soulmates, twin flames, whatever you want to call them, but there are also SOULMATE CONNECTIONS. Your soul is consciousness or thought. What's the difference Twin Flame & Soulmate connection? How do I know He/She is my twin flame? Next post...

Titan (mythology) The Titans were overthrown by a race of younger gods, the Olympians, in the Titanomachy ("War of the Titans"). The Greeks may have borrowed this mytheme from the Ancient Near East.[1] Greeks of the classical age knew of several poems about the war between the Olympians and Titans. The dominant one, and the only one that has survived, was in the Theogony attributed to Hesiod. Another myth concerning the Titans that is not in Hesiod revolves around Dionysus. Some scholars of the past century or so, including Jane Ellen Harrison, have argued that an initiatory or shamanic ritual underlies the myth of Dionysus' dismemberment and cannibalism by the Titans. Out of conflation with the Gigantes, various large things have been named after the Titans, for their "titanic" size, for example the RMS Titanic or the giant predatory bird Titanis walleri. The element titanium is named after the Titans, additionally, many of Saturn's moons are named after various Titans.

Hecate Name[edit] The etymology of the name Hecate (Ἑκάτη, Hekátē) is not known . Suggested derivations include: From the Greek word for 'will'.[8]From Ἑκατός Hekatos, an obscure epithet of Apollo.[9] This has been translated as "she that operates from afar", "she that removes or drives off",[10] "the far reaching one" or "the far-darter".[11]the name of the Egyptian goddess of childbirth, Heqet, has been compared.[12] In Early Modern English, the name was also pronounced disyllabic and sometimes spelled Hecat. The spelling Hecat is due to Arthur Golding's 1567 translation of Ovid's Metamorphoses,[13] and this spelling without the final E later appears in plays of the Elizabethan-Jacobean period.[14] Noah Webster in 1866 particularly credits the influence of Shakespeare for the then-predominant disyllabic pronunciation of the name.[15] Representations[edit] Statuette of Triple-bodied Hekate. The earliest Greek depictions of Hecate are single faced, not three-formed. Mythology[edit]

Pan (god) In Greek religion and mythology, Pan (/ˈpæn/;[1] Ancient Greek: Πᾶν, Pān) is the god of the wild, shepherds and flocks, nature of mountain wilds, hunting and rustic music, and companion of the nymphs.[2] His name originates within the Ancient Greek language, from the word paein (πάειν), meaning "to pasture."[3] He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat, in the same manner as a faun or satyr. With his homeland in rustic Arcadia, he is recognized as the god of fields, groves, and wooded glens; because of this, Pan is connected to fertility and the season of spring. The Roman Faunus, a god of Indo-European origin, was equated with Pan. The worship of Pan began in Arcadia which was always the principal seat of his worship. Representations of Pan on 4th century BC gold and silver Pantikapaion coins One of the famous myths of Pan involves the origin of his pan flute, fashioned from lengths of hollow reed. Pan is famous for his sexual powers, and is often depicted with a phallus.

Polish–Lithuanian union Painting commemorating Polish–Lithuanian union; ca. 1861. The motto reads "Eternal union". The most important acts in the process of union were: References[edit] (Polish) Anna Pasterak, Unie polsko-litewskie, Pedagogical University of Cracow, 2004 Notes[edit] See also[edit] Ymir In the Prose Edda, a narrative is provided that draws from, adds to, and differs from the accounts in the Poetic Edda. According to the Prose Edda, after Ymir was formed from the elemental drops, so too was Auðumbla, a primeval cow, whose milk Ymir fed from. The Prose Edda states that three gods killed Ymir; the brothers Odin, Vili, and Vé, and details that, upon Ymir's death, his blood caused an immense flood. Scholars have debated as to what extent Snorri's account of Ymir is an attempt to synthesize a coherent narrative for the purpose of the Prose Edda and to what extent Snorri drew from traditional material outside of the corpus that he cites. By way of historical linguistics and comparative mythology, scholars have linked Ymir to Tuisto, the Proto-Germanic being attested by Tacitus in his 1st century AD work Germania and have identified Ymir as an echo of a primordial being reconstructed in Proto-Indo-European mythology. Attestations[edit] Poetic Edda[edit] Prose Edda[edit]

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