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Why Your Job Cover Letter Sucks (and what you can do to fix it)

Why Your Job Cover Letter Sucks (and what you can do to fix it)
For the next few months I will be posting the “best of the best” Professor is in blog posts on the job market, for the benefit of all those girding their loins for the 2013-2014 market. Today’s post was originally published in 2011. I’ve now read about two thousand more job letters than I mention here. All the advice still applies. In my 15 years as a faculty member I served on approximately 11 search committees. Some of these search committees I chaired. Estimating that each search brought in an average of 200 applications (a conservative estimate for a field like Anthropology, a generous estimate for a much smaller field like East Asian Languages and Literatures), that means I have read approximately 2200 job applications. That means I’ve read 2200 job cover letters. I’ve also read the cover letters of my own students, and a passel of Ph.D. students who came to me for advice, as well as a large number of clients since opening The Professor is In (as of July 2012 let’s say 600). 1. 2. 3.

http://theprofessorisin.com/2013/05/17/why-your-job-cover-letter-sucks/

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The Six Ways You’re Acting Like a Grad Student (And how that’s killing you on the job market) For the next few months I will be posting the “best of the best” Professor is in blog posts on the job market, for the benefit of all those girding their loins for the 2013-2014 market. Today we have another Special Request post, this one coming from Liz, who asks, “You’re always telling us ‘not to act like graduate students.’ But how do I know when I’m doing it??” Thanks for asking this, Liz. It is an excellent question, especially at the start of the conference and job season. Home - Citing Your Sources - Research Guides at Southern New Hampshire University - Shapiro Library What exactly is plagiarism? Let's go to a source! As defined by Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed. to plagiarize is:

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Abstracts This page is brought to you by the OWL at Purdue University. When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice. Copyright ©1995-2018 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, reproduced, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.

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