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Perennial Vegetables: Years of Bounty

Perennial Vegetables: Years of Bounty
Perennial vegetables—crops that you plant just once and harvest year after year—are relatively rare in North American gardens. With the exception of asparagus, rhubarb and artichokes, most gardeners are probably unaware of the tasty, extremely low-maintenance bounty that can be harvested when many annual crops aren’t available. A Brief History of Perennial Crops According to Perennial Vegetables by Eric Toensmeier, most North American gardening and farming traditions come from Europe, where there are very few perennial crops except fruits and nuts. Cold and temperate Eurasian agriculture centered around livestock, annual grains and legumes, and early European settlers to North America simply brought their seeds and their cultivation methods with them, including draft animals for plowing up the soil every year. However, in more temperate and tropical areas of the world, including much of North America, perennial root, starch and fruit crops were actively bred, selected and cultivated. 11.

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These amazing trees grow up to 40 different types of fruit In all the time I’ve spent cruising around my quiet Seattle neighborhood for fallen sidewalk fruit (the semi-bruised apples are delicious), I’ve never thought to myself: “Geez. I wish all these trees had, like, 40 different kinds of fruit on them.” Until now. Artist and Syracuse University professor Sam Van Aken has made more than a dozen trees that bear all kinds of fruits and flowers, not just a single variety like the once-lauded peach and plum trees of yore — those pathetic, one-trick ponies. Van Aken creates these frankentrees using a horticultural technique called chip budding, which basically involves taking a small budding branch from one tree, sticking it into a slit carved out in another tree, wrapping the unholy mash-up in plastic, and waiting until they heal together into one cohesive branch.

10 Plants That Repel Garden Insect Pests Please Share This Page: Google + stumbleupon Vegetables that return in the spring (FIX) There is a problem at the heart of our traditional vegetable gardens. The issue is this: almost all of our most widely grown crops have to be sown from scratch at the most unpredictable time of year. During a season when soils are cold and weather can range from scorching hot to below freezing, we take the most vulnerable new seedlings and plant them outdoors. Our traditional method for growing is both a race and a gamble. We have to make new plants big and tough quickly enough to be able to deal with the outdoors, and hope their decreasing vulnerability and the increasing outdoor temperatures intersect at the sweet spot that allows the plants to live and thrive for the season.

Things People Don't Usually Know about Cats All felines, be them wild or domesticated, are part of the very same family, the one called Felidae. The domesticated cat comes from a species of small-sized wild cats, called Felis Silvestris. The only feline which lives in packs is the lion. All the other felines are solitary hunters, they rather live on their own than go for a community life. Another interesting and unusual fact about cats is that their heart can beat two times faster than the human heart. Thus, a cat's heart can beat 240 times/minute.

Tomato Leaves: The Toxic Myth Maybe it was my Asian upbringing that taught me never to waste food, as my family used and ate every part of the vegetable, fish, chicken, pig or cow that we brought home. Or maybe it’s my ever-growing curiosity when it comes to food from the land… but when I walk around the garden, looking at all my lovely plants, I always think, Can I eat that part? And by “part,” I mean the unconventional parts of the plant that you typically don’t think to eat. This was how I came to love artichoke stems, leek greens, and cucumber leaves, parts that are normally discarded or composted, but are in fact quite tasty. So one day, when I was walking by my tomato plants, I started wondering whether the leaves were edible or not. With vines that sometimes grow to 10 feet long, it seemed like such a waste that the leaves weren’t used when the amount of fruit seemed so small in proportion.

Permaculture Design for Small Farms and Homesteads - Sustainable Farming Conventional agricultural ecosystems (i.e., farms) are inherently fragile: Their productivity can be sustained only if fossil fuel subsidies, in one form or another, are employed as inputs. Most farms entail, as well, other very serious environmental costs. Clearly, we need to create new food raising systems that will conserve soil, water, and nutrients ... minimize the use of fossil fuels, chemical fertilizers, and synthetic pesticides ... and lead to regionally self-reliant food systems. Alternative farming practices—known variously as organic, biological, or biodynamic methods—come closer to meeting such a criterion of sustainability. Nationwide, an estimated 30,000 farmers now rely on crop rotation, animal manures, legumes, green manures, mechanical cultivation, mineral-bearing rocks, and biological pest control to maintain soil productivity and tilth, supply plant nutrients, and control insects, weeds, and other pests.

Perennial Vegetables: Grow More Food With Less Work Suppose a new agricultural breakthrough promised higher yields, a longer growing season and much less work. These claims can become real benefits for those willing to make a change to a way of gardening that more closely mimics nature. Nature’s ecosystems always include not only annual vegetables, but also perennials — edible roots, shoots, leaves, flowers and fruits that produce year after year. Why Do Cats Sleep So Much? Did You Know? Although they master the art of sleeping, they are light-sleepers. Their propensity to wake up at the slightest noise or touch is a genetic survival mechanism.

Concept Plan for a Sustainable Farm Here is a sustainable-living concept plan for a 1/4 acre home in an urban setting. I hope you can get some good ideas from it for your own home! Following this plan is a concept plan for a home on acreage.

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