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95 Young Adult Books To Read This Summer Instead Of Reading 'Harry Potter' AGAIN

95 Young Adult Books To Read This Summer Instead Of Reading 'Harry Potter' AGAIN

Your mega summer reading list: 70+ picks from the TED community Summer: the season for cracking open a good book under the shade of a tree. Below, we’ve compiled about 70 stellar book recommendations from members of the TED community. Warning: not all of these books can be classified as beach reads. And we think that is a good thing. Picks from Elizabeth Gilbert, author The Principles of Uncertainty by Maira Kalman. Age of Wonder: The Romantic Generation and the Discovery of the Beauty and Terror in Science by Richard Holmes. What Are You Optimistic About? Meditations by Marcus Aurelius. “ I find something incredibly soothing about the notion of a 2nd-century Roman emperor worrying about the same stuff I worry about—namely, how are we to be? Mixing Minds: The Power of Relationship in Psychoanalysis and Buddhism by Pilar Jennings. Refusing Heaven by Jack Gilbert. Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That Happened by Allie Brosh. Want Not by Jonathan Miles. The Rings of Saturn by W.G.

Guide to High School Credits for Homeschool | LetsHomeschoolHighschool.com If you are preparing a high school transcript for a homeschooler, and he or she has used a variety of different materials, outside courses and curricula to complete their coursework, then you may be wondering how to tally the credits for the courses they have taken. The purpose of this guide is to help you decide how much credit to assign to each subject by looking at good equivalents for each type of learning tool. In general, a course that takes approximately a school year, or 120-180 hours of work to complete counts as one credit. A course that takes approximately one semester, or 60 hours to complete, would receive a half credit. About Kerry Kerry Jones is the site administrator at LetsHomeschoolHighschool.com, and is also a freelance writer and online marketing consultant in North Carolina.

PubMed The 50 Books Everyone Needs to Read, 1963-2013 The thing about reading is this: it takes a long time. There are innumerable books in the world, and many more good ones than can be read by any mortal in a lifetime. It’s hard to choose — especially if you’re a slow reader. So, to go along with the list of the best albums from 1963-2013, here you will find a single must-read book from each of the last 50 years. Of course, this is by its very nature an absurd undertaking, and many books have gotten the short end of the stick — there’s no other way to do it. 1963 — The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath Sylvia Plath’s only novel manages to be both elegant and filled with raw, seething emotion – no small feat, and not the least of the reasons the reading world is still obsessed with her. Also recommended: Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak; The Group, Mary McCarthy; V., Thomas Pynchon; Cat’s Cradle, Kurt Vonnegut; The Feminine Mystique, Betty Friedan

Krista Harper, PhD » Blog Archive » Kanban Style! Posted by Krista Harper on April 9th, 2013 Last week, after reading about Kanban boards after indulging in a little “productivity porn” (ie, reading academic/professional mother/geek productivity blogs), I decided to take the plunge. ”Kanban” is a term from Japanese management that simply means “signboard,” and it is simple a simple idea: use a large visual organizer to make the next tasks visible and to diagnose bottlenecks. It was made famous by Toyota’s “just-in-time” industrial systems: factory workers posted colored cards on a large signboard to indicate work that was backlogged at the factory, in-process, and shipped off. Kanban boards are now widely used by software developers and other “knowledge workers,” who updated it with that space age technology, the post-it note. Last week, I was juggling a number of complex projects at work and home. Note that I allowed myself no more than 6 “doing” cards in the center column.

Ebook Search & Free Ebook Downloads - Ebookbrowse.com 48 Good Books - University at Buffalo In cooperation with the UB Libraries, the UB Undergraduate Academies announce the Good Books project, a list of 48 good books which embody the mission and spirit of the five Undergraduate Academies: Civic Engagement, Entrepreneurship, Global Perspectives, Research Exploration and Sustainability. 40 maps that explain the world By Max Fisher By Max Fisher August 12, 2013 Maps can be a remarkably powerful tool for understanding the world and how it works, but they show only what you ask them to. So when we saw a post sweeping the Web titled "40 maps they didn't teach you in school," one of which happens to be a WorldViews original, I thought we might be able to contribute our own collection. Some of these are pretty nerdy, but I think they're no less fascinating and easily understandable. A majority are original to this blog, with others from a variety of sources. I've included a link for further reading on close to every one. [Additional read: How Ukraine became Ukraine and 40 more maps that explain the world] Click to enlarge.

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