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7 Key Characteristics Of Better Learning Feedback

7 Key Characteristics Of Better Learning Feedback by Grant Wiggins, Authentic Education On May 26, 2015, Grant Wiggins passed away. Grant was tremendously influential on TeachThought’s approach to education, and we were lucky enough for him to contribute his content to our site. Occasionally, we are going to go back and re-share his most memorable posts. Yesterday we shared an article on close reading, and today Grant looks at providing better feedback for learning. Whether or not the feedback is just “there” to be grasped or offered by another person, all the examples highlight seven key characteristics of helpful feedback. Helpful feedback is – Goal-referencedTransparentActionableUser-friendlyTimelyOngoingConsistent 1. Given a desired outcome, feedback is what tells me if I should continue on or change course. Note that goals (and the criteria for them) are often implicit in everyday situations. 2. 3. Thus, “good job!” 4. 5. A great problem in education, however, is the opposite. 6. 7.

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The 80/20 Rule: Maximize Your Potential in Less Time What makes the biggest difference in your teaching? If you hop online to the places where teachers hang out and ask that question, you will hear a bevy of answers. It only begets more questions. Reflecting on and refining assessment tasks It’s important educators understand where students are in their learning, and there are lots of ways to monitor this progress that can inform meaningful feedback and next steps. One example is an end of semester or end of unit assignment or portfolio task developed by the subject or classroom teacher. If you’ve designed one of these tasks, think about the process you undertook. Did the task hit the mark, in terms of quality and differentiation?

Creating Essential Questions Essential Questions created by Pat Clifford and Sharon Friesen Essential Questions develop foundational understandings. They provide the fundamental organizing principles that bound an inquiry and guide the development of meaningful, authentic tasks. Essential questions have several key components: 10 ways to encourage student reflection… Split Screen Teaching Optimal learning occurs when students are active participants in their own learning, rather than passive recipients of teacher-delivered content. For this to be effective, students really need to think about their learning. I worked with a group of teachers recently who felt their young students were not capable of writing meaningful reflections for their end of semester reports.

How To Give Students Specific Feedback That Actually Helps Them Learn How To Give Students Specific Feedback That Actually Helps Them Learn by Justin Chando To tell a student “great job”or “this needs work” is a missed opportunity. edutopia Formative assessment is an important part of effective instruction. Teachers can use observations, checklists, and quick quizzes to gather data that will inform their instruction. Formative assessment identifies areas where students are excelling and struggling so that teachers can best alter their instruction to meet the needs of all students. Earlier this year, I had the opportunity to work with a school looking to strengthen its formative assessment data collection by leveraging the power of tech-friendly tools. Technology can make formative assessment a seamless part of everyday activities.

Why Questions Are More Important Than Answers Why Questions Are More Important Than Answers by Terry Heick Clocks and old watches are miracles. If you’ve ever taken one apart and had a look at the intricate gears with their jutting teeth reaching out with just the right math to tick in rhythm with the pulse of the universe, you’ll see that whatever mind conjured the thing and all its parts is mad. Strengthening Lessons With A Student Work Protocol As the chill in the air gets chillier, and your stacks of student work pile up like fallen leaves, why not pause, take a breath, and take a moment to look at that student work in a new way. Sure, you need to look at the work to assess student progress, provide feedback, and celebrate student successes, but you can also use it to assess, refine, and celebrate your own work. The EQuiP Student Work Protocol is one way to do just that.

How To Give Students Specific Feedback That Actually Helps Them Learn How To Give Students Specific Feedback That Actually Helps Them Learn by Justin Chando To tell a student “great job”or “this needs work” is a missed opportunity. Formative Assessment Tools & Resources Recently, Teaching Channel brought you into classrooms where teachers and students are using formative assessment to adjust ongoing teaching and learning strategies to improve student learning: We partnered with Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium to bring you videos of teachers using formative assessment as a deliberate four-step process.In Engaging Students with Productive Struggles, you'll see how math teachers are using lessons from Mathematics Assessment Project to encourage students to grapple with math concepts.In Letting Students Grapple, watch students engaging in formative assessment lessons that address misconceptions. While these videos take a deep dive into formative assessment, we also want to provide you with some quick tips and resources.

Hacking Feedback: The Bookends This is part one of a three-part series by Sean on reforming feedback. This post focuses on structures for making students’ perception of their work, and reception of feedback, visible. I have a love-hate relationship with giving feedback. I love how potent a tool it is to help students move their learning forward.

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