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A Bloom's Digital Taxonomy For Evaluating Digital Tasks

A Bloom's Digital Taxonomy For Evaluating Digital Tasks
What makes Bloom’s Taxonomy such a power tool is its flexibility in framing almost anything–which is why you’ve been seeing a lot of it around lately, and will likely continue to. Whether you’re creating a checklist for instructional design, evaluating an assessment, skimming a favorite unit of yours, or using it as a walkthrough instrument to get a feel for the level of student thinking in a classroom, Bloom’s Taxonomy is a powerful tool for any educator at any level. So the following Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy was was especially interesting in how it mashes digital tasks–podcasting, blogging, networking, hacking, bookmarking, social media sharing, and so on, with the stalwart learning tool so graciously delivered by Benjamin Bloom. The result is Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy, from edorigami’s excellent wikispaces site. One Takeaway Thematically, this is a chart version promoting technology in learning–or rather technology-infused learning.

http://www.teachthought.com/learning/ablooms-digital-taxonomy-for-evaluating-digital-tasks/

Related:  TechnopédagogieOpen EvaluationRéférentiel de compétences et C2i2E/B2iPÉDAGOGIE TIC

Designing scoring rubrics for your classroom. Mertler, Craig A. Craig A. Mertler Bowling Green State University Rubrics are rating scales-as opposed to checklists-that are used with performance assessments. They are formally defined as scoring guides, consisting of specific pre-established performance criteria, used in evaluating student work on performance assessments. Rubrics are typically the specific form of scoring instrument used when evaluating student performances or products resulting from a performance task. There are two types of rubrics: holistic and analytic (see Figure 1). 5 Ways Video Conferencing Is Bringing Exciting Collaborative Interaction To Teaching and Learning Many of us are familiar with the use of computers, iPads, Smart Boards, and other technological tools in today’s classrooms. One relatively untapped tool for our classrooms is video conferencing. There are so many exciting possibilities that come with being able to see, hear, and communicate with people all over the world from the comfort of your classroom (or wherever you are learning). Image Source: mnn.com Let’s check out a handful of fun ways that there increasingly affordable solutions are being leveraged in our schools! One: Outlandish Field Trips

Understanding Rubrics by Heidi Goodrich Andrade Understanding Rubrics by Heidi Goodrich Andrade Authentic assessments tend to use rubrics to describe student achievement. At last, here’s clarity on the term. Every time I introduce rubrics to a group of teachers the reaction is the same — instant appeal (“Yes, this is what I need!”) 3 Edtech Tools You Can Use To Gamify Your Classroom Gamification is one of the buzzwords in education right now, and for a good reason: Gamification is empowering, exciting, and under the right circumstances can be the disruptive innovator many teachers desperately need in order to change the dynamics between knowledge and the learner. There is an explosion of EdTech tools destined to gamify the classroom, most of which are web-based, while others come in the form of an app. Understandably, a teacher might wonder what is the best way to navigate through this sea of new, and subsequently, not thoroughly tested activities and tools. Throughout the school year I tried several game-based platforms with my students.

How To Use Formative Assessment With (And Without) Technology Sometimes, integrating technology into your daily workflow and lesson plans isn’t that hard. Some things seem to lend themselves to a seamless transition between not using technology and using technology. Traditional assessment using technology can fall into this category (though admittedly simpler for some subject material than for others). Improving peer feedback with Public Critique So, how much of the feedback students get do you think comes from their peers? I’m not talking about feedback on their choice of trainers or on their ability to wear a hoodie with dash and élan, I’m talking about classroom feedback on their learning. So, go on; how much? Most teachers when asked to guess hazard something along the lines of 10-20%. In fact, according to research undertaken by Graham Nuthall*, the actual figure is more like 80%.

Giving a PowerPoint is NOT a Student Centered Lesson 21st Century teaching models call for a more student centered classroom. No longer is the teacher the holder of all knowledge. Students are able to conduct research, use social media tools to ask questions and find new information. Assessing creativity with critical thinking The other day as I showed one of the new Common Core ELA aligned presentation rubrics soon to be published by the Buck Institute for Education (it'll be in the FreeBIEs section) to a few colleagues I noticed a somewhat strong reaction to the word "creativity" being included in one of the sections. To be clear, this rubric is meant to assess a demonstration in project based learning that falls in the category of communication but the word creative shows up in the above standard "presentation aids" section. While the list of potential 21st Century Skills developed by various groups and organizations can be overwhelming many like to focus on the four C's (critical thinking, collaboration, communication and creativity). While I have argued for inclusion of compassion in a previous blog entry I think it's worth exploring the intersection of critical thinking and creativity and consider merging them for assessment purposes.

How To Write Engaging Questions for Online Forums Infographic Other Infographics Identifying the “right” question or questions that you want the community to address is a critical issue for community engagement practitioners; whether working online or face-to-face. While there is no absolutely “correct” way to ask a question, there are certainly ways NOT to ask a question. There are also ways to encourage deeper, broader and more specific thinking about complex topics. The How To Write Engaging Questions for Online Forums provides food for thought for anyone thinking about using online forums to engage their online community. Via: bangthetable.com

Ed Tech Frameworks: Why I Don't Use TPACK or SAMR with my Teachers **Update 4/26/14: I LOVE the responses to this post; they made me consider a lot of different ways of looking at TPACK and SAMR, and really stretched my thinking. If you read this post, also read the comments- and check out the links that some people have included!I’m going to preface this post by saying that I think both TPACK and SAMR are incredibly useful frameworks- and I use them a lot in my work with education technology.

Rubrics for Assessment A collection of rubrics for assessing portfolios, cooperative learning, research process/ report, PowerPoint, oral presentation, web page, blog, wiki, and other social media projects. Quick Links to Rubrics Social Media Project Rubrics Wiki Rubric Criteria for assessing individual and group Wiki contributions. Blog Rubric Assess individual blog entries, including comments on peers' blogs. Twitter Rubric Assess learning during social networking instructional assignments.

30 Ways To Promote Creativity in Your Classroom For the Spanish translation click here The concept of teaching creativity has been around for quite some time. Academics such as E. In Online Courses, Students Learn More by Doing Than by Watching When students enroll in MOOCs, they almost always watch a series of video lectures. But just watching videos — without also engaging interactively — is an ineffective way to learn, according to a study by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University. The study, “Learning Is Not a Spectator Sport: Doing Is Better Than Watching for Learning From a MOOC,” looked at a generally available course, offered through the Georgia Institute of Technology, called “Introduction to Psychology as a Science.”

Glogster as an assessment tool Posted by José Picardo on August 24, 2012 It was a tremendous privilege to invited to present earlier this month at the Social Media Workshop 2012 organised by San Diego State University’s Language Acquisition Resource Center. My session was titled Glogster for the Language Classroom and the following notes are derived from it.

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