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Technologically Externalized Knowledge and Learning

Let’s take a step back and consider how well we are using learning technology in contrast with what is possible given advances over the last decade. Ideologies influence design, then design constrains future options. We don’t have to look very far to see examples of this simple rule: classrooms, design of organizational work activities, politics, and the operation of financial markets. What we create to survive during one era serves as neurosis for another. In education – particularly in technology enhanced education – a similar trailing of ideologies from another era is observed. For example, education consultants and speakers commonly declare “if a student from 100 years ago came to our classrooms, she would feel right at home”. What are the ideologies reflected in this approach to learning? 1. Other ideologies exist, but these are particularly influential in education, impacting design to accreditation. What is wrong with these views? The externalized generation… 1. What is TEKL?

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Connectivism Connectivism is a hypothesis of learning which emphasizes the role of social and cultural context. Connectivism is often associated with and proposes a perspective similar to Vygotsky's 'zone of proximal development' (ZPD), an idea later transposed into Engeström's (2001) Activity theory.[1] The relationship between work experience, learning, and knowledge, as expressed in the concept of ‘connectivity, is central to connectivism, motivating the theory's name.[2] It is somewhat similar to Bandura's Social Learning Theory that proposes that people learn through contact. The phrase "a learning theory for the digital age"[3] indicates the emphasis that connectivism gives to technology's effect on how people live, communicate and learn. Nodes and links[edit] The central aspect of connectivism is the metaphor of a network with nodes and connections.[4] In this metaphor, a node is anything that can be connected to another node such as an organization, information, data, feelings, and images.

Engaging Students with Engaging Tools (EDUCAUSE Quarterly Key Takeaways A new course teaching media, mass communication, and political identities in the Middle East and North Africa explored the use of social media in pursuit of effective learning. Using a variety of social media and other tools encouraged student engagement in and out of the classroom. Student responses varied from discomfort with the technology to enthusiastic adoption and continued use after the course ended.

PLENK 2010 - The Most Awesome Course on Planet Earth! Over the next nine (9) weeks this post will be continuously littered with my reflections as I learn week-by-week (One mega post, instead of 9-10 small ones! Between 4000-6000 words for sure!), but for now I am too busy engrossed learning and making noise beyond this blog. But, before scanning my reflections, here are the most juicy collaborative reflections of PLENK2010. Opening Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue: A Virtual Workshop on Methodology (2nd edition 2013) Opening CrOss-DisCiplinary DialOgue: a Virtual WOrkshOp On MethODOlOgy F󰁲󰁯󰁧University of HelsinkiIn collaboration withP󰁡󰁵󰁬󰁩󰁩󰁮󰁡 L󰁡󰁴󰁶󰁡󰁬󰁡 University of Helsinki Interests and priorities in a range of intersecting research disciplines have been changing rapidly. Methods and methodologies have become an increasing concern, yet discussions on these issues have been developing to some degree independently of one another in different fields and in the research traditions of different countries. Opening dialogue across disciplines and national scholar-ships surrounding the theme of methods and methodologies was a goal of the publication project of which

Connectivism and its Critics: What Connectivism Is Not Posted to the CCK08 Blog, September 10, 2008. There are some arguments that argue, essentially, that the model we are demonstrating here would not work in a traditional academic environment. - Lemire - Fitzpatrick - Kashdan These arguments, it seems to me, are circular. They defend the current practice by the current practice. Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day… - The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education — 2010 This annual post is always the most popular one of the year. You might want to visit previous editions: The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education — 2009 The Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education — 2008

Massive open online course Poster, entitled "MOOC, every letter is negotiable," exploring the meaning of the words "Massive Open Online Course" A Massive Open Online Course (MOOC; /muːk/) is an online course aimed at unlimited participation and open access via the web. In addition to traditional course materials such as videos, readings, and problem sets, MOOCs provide interactive user forums that help build a community for students, professors, and teaching assistants (TAs). MOOCs are a recent development in distance education.[1] From Connected Educator to Connected Classroom Posted by Brianna Crowley on Thursday, 10/09/2014 Two weeks ago I shared my journey to becoming a connected educator. It's one I share with a mixture of pride and relief--pride for the huge changes I've seen in myself as a result of my PLN and relief knowing that I never again have to feel isolated in my professional learning. This year I embarked on a new challenge. One that strives to include my students in this powerful world of connected learning.

The 35 Best Web 2.0 Classroom Tools Chosen By You 100 Web 2.0 Tools Every Teacher Should Know About 44.24K Views 0 Likes We're always trying to figure out the best tools for teachers, trends in the education technology industry, and generally doing our darnedest to bring you new and exciting ways to enhance the classroom. But I wanted t... 20 Free and Fun Ways To Curate Web Content Talk:Connectivism wikipedia as a battlefield of views and beliefs?[edit] Of course everyone is entittled to a view on any subject. But describing a subject as an item in an encyclopedia is something different from discussing the content of an item and the validity of a --ism. Not agreeing on connectivism is not a reason for deleting an item on connectivism. 16:35, 6 February 2011 (UTC) — Preceding unsigned comment added by JaapB (talk • contribs) Jaap, I am not so sure.

Anywhere Anytime Learning is Changing: Implications for Parents, HigherEd and K-12 Wikipedia and the initials “www” burst onto the scene in 1994 (the same year most states were implementing standards-based reform) making it the official beginning of the anywhere anytime learning era. For most of two decades, anywhere anytime learning advanced outside of formal education. Five years of venture investments and the explosion of mobile resulted in two big implications: 1) formal education is rapidly blending new technology and 2) anywhere anytime learning is a viable alternative to formal education in dynamic job clusters. The $1.6 billion invested in EdTech in the first half of 2015 was driven, in large part, by big anywhere anytime learning deals. The year started with Lynda.com raising $186 million in a round led by TPG Capital.

The Complete Educator’s Guide to Using Skype effectively in the classroom Increasingly, educators globally are transforming their classroom using Skype to create powerful, authentic, motivating learning experiences for their students. From connecting with classrooms in other locations to learning about each others’ culture to connecting with content experts – educators are extending learning beyond classroom walls. So how do you use Skype effectively with your class? Hopefully this will help!

About — Connectivism Description of Connectivism Connectivism is a learning theory for the digital age. Learning has changed over the last several decades. The theories of behaviourism, cognitivism, and constructivism provide an effect view of learning in many environments. They fall short, however, when learning moves into informal, networked, technology-enabled arena. When Education Leadership Fails You #Edchat “What is right is not always popular and what is popular is not always right.” – Albert Einstein Educators connecting online can transform your life. I’ve shared this many times as a connected educator evangelist. We can use our audience and followings to share students’ voices or support teachers who need mentors, ideas, and the benefits of a community. A lot of times, this is what I love about the educators I connect with and I hope you will continue to let online communities transform education, your teaching, and your learning. My blog and tweets are often filled with inspiration and my excitement at cool tools, ideas, and the projects I put blood, sweat, and tears into.

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