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Revolutionary "Superman" Memory Crystals Can Store Data Virtually Forever

Revolutionary "Superman" Memory Crystals Can Store Data Virtually Forever
Quartz Crystal photo from Shutterstock While most of us are just getting used to the idea of 3D printing, scientists are already working on technological marvels that operate two dimensions deeper. Researchers at the University of Southampton have succeeded in recording and retrieving five dimensional digital data using a quartz crystal. The ‘Superman’ memory crystal is a futuristic storage technique with unprecedented features – including a 360 terabyte per disc data capacity, thermal stability up to 1000°C and a practically unlimited lifetime. We’ve all seen those sci-fi movies where a gorgeous alien shoves a pointy crystal into some mega computer and the world is saved. So how does it work? “The self-assembled nanostructures change the way light travels through glass, modifying polarization of light that can then be read by combination of optical microscope and a polarizer, similar to that found in Polaroid sunglasses,” states the release. Via Eureakalert and DVice Related:  FUTURE TECH

Perfect Faults: A Self-Correcting Crystal May Unleash the Next Generation of Advanced Communications Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have joined with an international team to engineer and measure a potentially important new class of nanostructured materials for microwave and advanced communication devices. Based on NIST's measurements, the new materials—a family of multilayered crystalline sandwiches—might enable a whole new class of compact, high-performance, high-efficiency components for devices such as cellular phones.* "These materials are an excellent example of what the Materials Genome Initiative refers to as 'materials-by-design'," says NIST physicist James Booth, one of the lead researchers. "Materials science is getting better and better at engineering complex structures at an atomic scale to create materials with previously unheard-of properties." The new material has layers of strontium oxide, believed to be responsible for the self-correcting feature, separating a variable number of layers of strontium titanate. *C-H Lee, N.D.

Stop Hyping Big Data and Start Paying Attention to 'Long Data' | Wired Opinion Our species can’t seem to escape big data. We have more data inputs, storage, and computing resources than ever, so Homo sapiens naturally does what it has always done when given new tools: It goes even bigger, higher, and bolder. We did it in buildings and now we’re doing it in data. Sure, big data is a powerful lens — some would even argue a liberating one — for looking at our world. Despite its limitations and requirements, crunching big numbers can help us learn a lot about ourselves. But no matter how big that data is or what insights we glean from it, it is still just a snapshot: a moment in time. Samuel Arbesman is an applied mathematician and network scientist. By “long” data, I mean datasets that have massive historical sweep — taking you from the dawn of civilization to the present day. Because as beautiful as a snapshot is, how much richer is a moving picture, one that allows us to see how processes and interactions unfold over time? We also need to build better tools.

Hempcrete Could Change The Way We Build Everything When it comes to new and sustainable housing ideas, it seems to always be about creating a more efficient home in terms of insulation, lighting, electricity, etc. Mainstream belief on the subject would have you believe that top corporations and government projects are working with the best possible technology to bring forth solutions that work and are going to be great for the environment. If that was truly the case, I can guarantee you that the whole world would be using Hempcrete right now. Haven’t heard of it? I’m not too surprised. First off, what is Hempcrete? Since lime is the binding material, builders do not have to heat up the lime as much as a supplier would need to in the industrial creation of concrete. conservation when producing Hempcrete vs. concrete. Hempcrete is a much more superior building material due to the fact that it is a very strong, lightweight and breathable material. petrify but is still incredibly strong.

Oh, those crazy Frenchies: Facebook faces family photo tax in France High performance access to file storage Facebook should pay the French government for hosting the holiday photos and status updates of the French people, a new report commissioned by the French government has suggested. The new 200-page report* on taxing the digital economy - commissioned by four French Cabinet Ministers - proposes that France should tax data collection. The touted idea would see new tax bills from the French government landing on Google, Facebook, Amazon and any other web companies that store data about their French users. The report was commissioned in July by Fleur Pellerin, France's Minister for Small and Medium Enterprise, Innovation and the Digital Economy, backed by three colleagues amid government frustration about the low tax American web giants were paying in France. Web companies pay under 1 per cent of what a standard French company would pay in tax, according to figures from Le Monde. French wonks: Let's tax data like we tax pollution

The future according to Google's Larry Page Note: On Jan 3, as Fortune published this article, the Federal Trade Commission ended its investigation of Google's search practices saying it found no evidence that the company manipulated search results in violation of antitrust laws. The European Commission and other regulators continue to investigate the issue. FORTUNE -- When Sir Martin Sorrell, CEO of WPP Group, the giant advertising agency, visited Google this past fall, CEO Larry Page sent a car to pick him up at the Rosewood Hotel about 20 miles away. Only this was no ordinary car. The Lexus SUV drove itself thanks to a slew of high-tech tools, including radars, sensors, and a laser scanner that takes more than 1.5 million measurements every second. For about 20 minutes, while navigating I-280 and the area's busy State Route 85, the car cruised on autopilot, making quick course corrections, slowing down here when traffic loomed ahead, speeding up there to get out of the blind spot of a neighboring vehicle. MORE: Meet the L-Team

20 Game-Changing Technology Trends That Will Create Both Disruption and Opportunity on a Global Level | Flash Foresights from Daniel Burrus No matter what industry you’re in, your company can’t survive without technology. And these days, even non-technical employees know that technology goes way beyond desktop computers and networks. From smart phones and tablet computers to mobile apps and cloud-based technology, there’s a plethora of technological advancements to not only keep track of, but also to profit from. To stay competitive, your organization needs to anticipate the most significant technology trends that are shaping your business and then develop innovative ways to use them to your advantage, both inside and outside of your organization. Over the next five short years the following game-changing technologies will transform how we sell, market, communicate, collaborate, educate, train, innovate, and much more. Rapid Growth of Big Data. Spot Your Own Hard TrendsAre these the only game-changing technology-driven trends to be aware of? Visit www.Burrus.com for more information.

The inevitability of smart dust I’ve put forward my opinion that desktop computing is dead on more than one occasion, and been soundly put in my place as a result almost every time. “Of course desktop computing isn’t dead — look at the analogy you’re drawing between the so called death of the mainframe and the death of the desktop. Mainframes aren’t dead, there are still plenty of them around!” Well, yes, that’s arguable. The desktop will increasingly belong to niche users. For the rest of the world? People never wanted computers; they wanted what computers could do for them. Everyday objects are already becoming smarter. The sensors you carry with you may well generate more data every second, both for you and about you, than previous generations did about themselves during the course of their entire lives. The end point of this evolution is already clear: it’s called smart dust. Makes desktop computing look sort of dull, doesn’t it? Photo: it’s not fog… it’s smoke… by Guilherme Jófili, on Flickr Related:

Harper Reed, Obama’s Data Guru, Gets Voters to Engage—and Provide Their Info Along the Way | 80beats What do custom-designed T-shirts and presidential campaigns have in common? Harper Reed, chief technology officer for the Obama campaign, rose to prominence because he knew the answer: They both can benefit from websites that engage users and encourage community participation—and, in the process, gather valuable data. In a profile at Mother Jones, Tim Murphy describes how such potentially powerful and jealously guarded tech strategies—Obama’s go by codenames like “Narwhal” and “Dreamcatcher”—work. Reed got his start at Threadless, a website that sells quirky T-shirts to hipsters. But as Murphy details, the site didn’t just make shirts and expect people to buy them; it was a social forum that asked for their input every step of the way: Threadless wasn’t the first company to market arty apparel to the Wicker Park set, but its genius lay in its model. Now chief technology officer of the Obama campaign, Reed has now created a grassroots organizing website called Dashboard.

Kurzweil joins Google to work on new projects involving machine learning and language processing Ray Kurzweil confirmed today that he will be joining Google to work on new projects involving machine learning and language processing. “I’m excited to share that I’ll be joining Google as Director of Engineering this Monday, December 17,” said Kurzweil. “I’ve been interested in technology, and machine learning in particular, for a long time: when I was 14, I designed software that wrote original music, and later went on to invent the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, among other inventions. I’ve always worked to create practical systems that will make a difference in people’s lives, which is what excites me as an inventor. “In 1999, I said that in about a decade we would see technologies such as self-driving cars and mobile phones that could answer your questions, and people criticized these predictions as unrealistic.

Data Centers Support the Cloud—But Waste 90 Percent of Their Energy in the Process | 80beats Once I’ve typed in a message, shared a video, or uploaded a photo to a social media website like Facebook or Twitter, I tend to forget about it. I assume that if I check back days or even weeks later, the status update or tweet will still be there, safely stored…somewhere. That “somewhere” is in one of tens of thousands of data centers, each filled with many, many servers that physically preserve the vast quantity of information flowing over the internet every day. But while it’s easy to forget about data centers, they are having a huge impact on our energy grid—and our environment. The New York Times has kicked off a series of articles about the physical constructions on which “the cloud” is built with a piece by James Glanz. Worldwide, the digital warehouses use about 30 billion watts of electricity, roughly equivalent to the output of 30 nuclear power plants, according to estimates industry experts compiled for The Times. Image courtesy of Route79 / flickr

A second generation 3D concrete printing is under development Mar.16, 2012 Modern Architecture is demanding new developments in construction manufacturing technology, a team at Loughborough University has been working on a 3D concrete printing project that could allow full scale building components to be 3D printed on-site to any design. Named Freeform Construction, the project gives architects a tremendous degree of design freedom and to industry it reduces waste and CO2 emissions compared to a conventional concrete form building. In the process, concrete is deposited in layers very precisely from computer-generated instructions. Richard Buswell, a principal investigator on the project, said, "Anything is possible. We are working with a prototype, but within five years - with money and desire - there's no limit to what could be printed." In 2010 a one-tonne reinforced concrete bench has been printed and a year later a two square meter "S"-curved panel is exhibited in the Building Centre.

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