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Teaching Geological Time Eras To Students With Help From This Video

Teaching Geological Time Eras To Students With Help From This Video

Wegener's Puzzling Evidence Exercise (6th Grade) Although Alfred Wegener was not the first to suggest that continents have moved about the Earth, his presentation of carefully compiled evidence for continental drift inspired decades of scientific debate. Wegener's evidence, in concert with compelling evidence provided by post World War II technology, eventually led to universal acceptance of the theory of Plate Tectonics in the scientific community. The following files are needed for this exercise and can be downloaded in pdf format (Teacher Overview, (For Teachers) Wegener's Key to Continental Positions for grade 6, Student Puzzle Pieces, Key to Wegener's Evidence sheet, and Student Map of the World Today). If students need additional hints beyond those provided below, there is a Puzzle Outline Hint to be used as a base for the puzzle. Objectives Students will observe and analyze scientific evidence used by Wegener. The Student Puzzle Pieces and Legend To start this activity the teacher will present background information on Wegener.

Now_and_Then When you first find a fossil it is sometimes hard to tell what kind of animal it belonged to. It is usually just a part of the original animal. In this section you will find pictures of various fossils that you too may some day discover. Just click on the picture and not only will you see a larger photo of the fossil but you will also see what the original animal may have looked like millions of years ago!! National Geographic: The Story of Earth HD Mineral Properties, Uses and Descriptions Diamond Diopside Dolomite Enstatite Epidote Fluorite Fuchsite Galena Garnet Glauconite Gold Graphite Gypsum Layers of the Earth Videos - Geology Geology may be a science that moves very slowly, but a number of videos bring the subject to life for students. Education World compiled some great videos that will get kids excited about the topic. For each one, we include a description and grade level. We also note the video’s capacity for engagement (“cool factor”). The Geology and Formation of the Western Land of U.S. Source: World-earthquakes.com. Grade level: Sixth grade or higher Run time: 44:59 Description: This rather dramatic video shows geology in action—specifically, how the western part of the United States came to look the way it does. Cool factor: Not as cool as some, but dramatizations of geologic activities add interest. National Geographic Colliding Continents Source: National Geographic Grade level: All ages Run time: 50:05 Description: This video is a documentary of the Earth’s violent past and the movement of the tectonic plates. Geology Kitchen: What is a Mineral? Source: Explorer Multimedia Run time: 5:44 Source: IGP

Description Table | USGS Schoolyard Geology Download this page as a Microsoft WORD document | Download this page as a PDF Document As a geologist, you need to practice describing rocks in detail. It's not enough just to say "it's a rock". Find a particularly interesting rock on your schoolyard. Schoolyard Geology Home • Lesson 1 • Lesson 2 • Lesson 3 • Downloads About | USGS Schoolyard Geology The main purpose of this web site is to introduce teachers to the geologic features on their own schoolyard. We hope to open their eyes to the possibilities for teaching geology to students in a familiar, easily accessible, and personally relevant setting. We have divided the site into three individual lessons: Teaching Sequence The lessons are completely independent but can work together as an effective sequence. The map exercises of Lesson 1 come first because teachers can refer to the schoolyard map throughout future exercises. During the mapping exercise, students will realize that there are geologic materials all over their schoolyard. Lesson 3 is a resource of example geologic features that might have analogs in the schoolyard. Schoolyard Geology Home • Lesson 1 • Lesson 2 • Lesson 3 • Downloads

Common Misconceptions About Rocks and Minerals — Rocks and Minerals Although the research base for geologic misconceptions is not as extensive as that of other disciplines within earth and space science, it is clear that students and teachers alike hold a wide range of incorrect ideas about rocks, minerals, and the rock cycle. To promote accurate scientific instruction, it is important that teachers are cognizant of their own understanding and seek to continually improve their content knowledge. Formative assessment can provide a great deal of insight into student thinking before, during, and after instruction. Geologic Misconceptions Geologic misconceptions can take many forms – the language used to define and describe specimens, relevant properties for classification, the rock cycle, and geologic time. Communication Breakdown A major source of geologic misconceptions is the discrepancy between the use of geologic terms in everyday language versus scientific communication. Other words, such as mineral and crystal, are also misused in everyday language.

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