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Jeet Kune Do

Jeet Kune Do
Jeet Kune Do, also Jeet Kun Do, and abbreviated JKD, is an eclectic and hybrid martial art system and philosophy of life founded by the martial artist Bruce Lee[2] (1940-1973) 1960 with simple and direct, or straightforward, movements and non-classical style. Jeet Kune Do practitioners believe in minimal movements with maximum effects and extreme speed. The system works by using different "tools" for different situations, where the situations are divided into ranges, which is kicking, punching, trapping, and grappling, where we use techniques to flow smoothly between them. It is referred to as "a style without style" or "the art of fighting without fighting" as said by Lee himself. Unlike more traditional martial arts, Jeet Kune Do is not fixed or patterned, and is a philosophy with guiding thoughts. In 2004, the Bruce Lee Foundation decided to use the name Jun Fan Jeet Kune Do (振藩截拳道) to refer to the martial arts system that Lee founded; "Jun Fan" was Lee's Chinese given name. Related:  martial arts

Pressure point The concept of pressure points is present in old school (17th century) Japanese martial arts and is claimed to have an even earlier history; in a 1942 article in the Shin Budo magazine, Takuma Hisa asserted the existence of a tradition attributing the first development of pressure-point attacks to Shinra Saburō Minamoto no Yoshimitsu (1045–1127).[2] Hancock and Higashi (1905) published a book which pointed out a number of vital points in Japanese martial arts.[3] Exaggerated accounts of pressure-point fighting appeared in Chinese Wuxia fiction and became known by the name of Dim Mak, or "Death Touch", in western popular culture in the 1960s. While it is undisputed that there are sensitive points on the human body where even comparatively weak pressure may induce significant pain or serious injury, the association of kyūsho with esotericist notions of qi, acupuncture, or reflexology is controversial.[4] Types[edit] The nervous system. Pain[edit] Blood and blood pressure[edit] Break[edit]

Vale tudo Vale tudo (IPA: [ˈvali ˈtudu]; English: anything goes) are full-contact unarmed combat events, with a limited number of rules, that became popular in Brazil during the 20th century.[1] Vale Tudo has been considered a combat sport by some observers.[2] Vale Tudo uses techniques from many martial art styles, making it similar to modern mixed martial arts. History[edit] 1920s to 1980s[edit] Fighting sideshows termed "Vale Tudo" became popular in Brazilian circuses during the 1920s.[3] Examples of such bouts were described in the Japanese-American Courier on October 4, 1928:[4] One report from São Paulo declares that Jiu Jitsu is truly an art and that in an interesting exhibition in the side tent to the big circus a Bahian of monstrous dimensions met his waterloo at the hands of a diminutive Japanese wrestler. From 1960 onwards, Vale Tudo remained a mostly underground subculture, with most fights taking place in martial arts dojos or small gymnasiums. 1990s to present[edit] References[edit]

Zen Do Kai History[edit] The first Zen Do Kai dojo was opened at Elizabeth Street, Melbourne. Jones states that it was originally intended to cater for those who worked in the security industry.[1] Zen Do Kai follows the classical martial arts model with a distinct hierarchy, a philosophy and the promotion of the ethical code of Bushido. The web site of Bob Jones Corporation Pty Ltd claims that Zen Do Kai has clubs located in Australia, New Zealand and Israel.[2] Philosophy[edit] Malcolm Anderson's Split and Anderson Bushi Kai[edit] Malcolm Anderson was sent to Queensland to take charge of the development of Zen Do Kai in that region in the 1970s. Disputes arose between Anderson and Jones that led to Anderson being removed as the head of Zen Do Kai in Queensland in late-2000. References[edit]

Jailhouse rock (fighting style) Jailhouse rock or JHR is a name which is used to describe a collection of different fighting styles that have been practiced and/or developed within US penal institutions. The different regional “styles” of JHR vary but share a common emphasis on improvisation governed by a specific set of underlying principles. Some examples of the many styles of JHR are 52 Hand Blocks, Brick City Rock, Comstock Style, Stato. Many of these styles of JHR are thought to have evolved regionally in different penal institutions.[1] 52 blocks has been referenced in journalist Douglas Century's Street Kingdom: Five Years Inside the Franklin Avenue Posse, as well as numerous Wu Tang Clan songs and Ted Conover's book Newjack. The existence of this martial art has been debated, but some media exposure has contributed towards verifying the existence of Jailhouse Rock. The name 52 may be a reference to the playing card games of 52 Pickup and to the expression "let the cards fall where they may."

Defendu Defendu is a modern martial art developed by William E. Fairbairn and Eric A. Sykes prior to World War II. It is a hand-to-hand combat system based on practical experience mixed with jujutsu and boxing that was developed to train the Shanghai Municipal Police, and was later taught in expanded form to Office of Strategic Services and Special Operations Executive members during World War II.[1] Development[edit] Based on his training in boxing, wrestling, savate, early Judo at the Kodokan in Tokyo, and fights he was involved in during his police work, Fairbairn began to develop his own system of hand to hand combat, calling it "Defendu". Fairbairn was called upon by the British to help train Allied troops in World War II. The original Defendu was oriented towards self-defense and restraint, while the Close Quarters Combat system concentrated on rapid disabling of an opponent, with potentially lethal force. World War II[edit] Post war[edit] See also[edit] World War II combatives Defendu, W.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Brazilian jiu-jitsu (/dʒuːˈdʒɪtsuː/; Portuguese: [ˈʒiw ˈʒitsu], [ˈʒu ˈʒitsu], [dʒiˈu dʒiˈtsu]) (BJJ; Portuguese: jiu-jitsu brasileiro) is a martial art, combat sport, and a self defense system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting. Brazilian jiu-jitsu was formed from Kodokan Judo ground fighting (newaza) fundamentals that were taught by a number of individuals including Takeo Yano, Mitsuyo Maeda and Soshihiro Satake. Brazilian jiu-jitsu eventually came to be its own art through the experiments, practices, and adaptation of the judo knowledge of Carlos and Hélio Gracie, who then passed their knowledge on to their extended family. History[edit] Origins[edit] Geo Omori opened the first jujutsu / judo school in Brazil in 1909. [5] He would go on to teach a number of individuals including Luiz França. Gastão Gracie was a business partner of the American Circus in Belém. Name[edit] Some confusion has arisen over the employment of the term 'jiudo'. Prominence[edit] Guards[edit]

Zui Quan Concept[edit] Zui quan is a category of techniques, forms and fighting philosophy that appear to imitate a drunkard's movements.[1] The postures are created by momentum and weight of the body, and imitation is generally through staggering and certain type of fluidity in the movements. It is considered to be among the most difficult wushu styles to learn due to the need for powerful joints and fingers. While in fiction practitioners of zui quan are often portrayed as being actually intoxicated, zui quan techniques are highly acrobatic and skilled and require a great degree of balance and coordination, such that any person attempting to perform any zui quan techniques while intoxicated would be likely to injure themselves.[2] Style[edit] Even though the style seems irregular and off balance it takes the utmost balance to be successful. Zui quan within Chinese martial arts[edit] Media appearances[edit] References[edit] External links[edit]

Kajukenbo Kajukenbo is an American hybrid martial art. The name Kajukenbo comes from the original arts of which it was composed: KA for Karate, JU for Judo and Jujutsu, KEN for Kenpo and BO for Boxing. Today, Kajukenbo is practiced all over the world in many distinctive branches.[citation needed] Unlike many traditional martial arts, students are not required to mimic their teacher, but are encouraged to develop their own "expression" of the art. Each branch continues to evolve their training, adopting and taking in the techniques of many other martial arts. History[edit] Kajukenbo was founded in 1947 in the Palamas Settlement on Oahu, Hawaii. In the late 1940s, the Palamas Settlement was a violent area where fist-fights and stabbings were commonplace. In its conception, the founders followed a simple rule, if a technique worked consistently on the street (or against one another), then it stayed in the system, if it did not, it was discarded. The emerging style was named Kajukenbo. Ranking[edit]

Martial arts The martial art of boxing was practiced in the ancient Thera. Martial arts are codified systems and traditions of combat practices, which are practiced for a variety of reasons: self-defense, competition, physical health and fitness, entertainment, as well as mental, physical, and spiritual development. Variation and scope[edit] Martial arts may be categorized along a variety of criteria, including: By technical focus[edit] Unarmed Grappling Weapon-based Those traditional martial arts which train armed combat often encompass a wide spectrum of melee weapons, including bladed weapons and polearms. Sometimes, training with one specific weapon will be considered a style of martial arts in its own right, which is especially the case in Japanese martial arts with disciplines such as kenjutsu and kendo (sword), bojutsu (staff), and kyudo (archery). By application or intent[edit] Combat-oriented Health-oriented Spirituality-oriented Martial arts can also be linked with religion and spirituality.

No Nonsense Self Defense - Reliable information for dangerous situations Monkey Kung Fu Monkey Kung Fu, or Monkey Fist (猴拳), is a Chinese martial art which utilizes ape or monkey-like movements as part of its technique. There are a number of independently developed systems of monkey kung fu. Examples include Xingzhemen (行者門) named after the protagonist Sun Wukong of the popular Ming dynasty novel Journey to the West, Nanhouquan (南猴拳) or Southern Monkey Fist originating from the Southern Shaolin Temple as well as the better-known Da Sheng Pi Gua Men 大聖劈掛門 style of Hong Kong. Origins[edit] Hou Quan[edit] The Hou Quan style from the Emei region, taught by the famous "Monkey King" Xiao Yingpeng and others, was also used as the basis for the modern wushu variant of monkey style (and monkey staff) that is often seen in demonstrations and competitions today. Da Sheng Men[edit] Da Sheng Men, or "Great Sage" Kung Fu, was developed near the end of the Qing dynasty (1911) by a fighter named Kou Si (Kau Sei) from a small village in Northern China. Da Sheng Pi Gua[edit] Techniques[edit]

Marine Corps Martial Arts Program The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP, /ˈmɪkmæp/) is a combat system developed by the United States Marine Corps to combine existing and new hand-to-hand and close quarters combat (CQC) techniques with morale and team-building functions and instruction in the Warrior Ethos.[1] The program, which began in 2001, trains Marines (and U.S. Navy personnel attached to Marine units) in unarmed combat, edged weapons, weapons of opportunity, and rifle and bayonet techniques. It also stresses mental and character development, including the responsible use of force, leadership, and teamwork. History[edit] During World War I these bayonet techniques were supplemented with unarmed combat techniques, which often proved useful in trench warfare. Between the world wars, Colonel Anthony J. In July 2011, MCMAP performers from San Diego demonstrated for the Koyamada Foundation's United States Martial Arts Festival at the Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center in Redondo Beach, California.[3][4]

Jujutsu Jujutsu (/dʒuːˈdʒuːtsuː/; Japanese: 柔術, jūjutsu listen , Japanese pronunciation: [ˈdʑɯɯ.dʑɯ.tsɯ]) is a Japanese martial art and a method of close combat for defeating an armed and armored opponent in which one uses no weapon or only a short weapon.[1][2] The word jujutsu can be spelled as ju-jitsu/jujitsu, ju-jutsu. "Jū" can be translated to mean "gentle, soft, supple, flexible, pliable, or yielding." "Jutsu" can be translated to mean "art" or "technique" and represents manipulating the opponent's force against himself rather than confronting it with one's own force.[1] Jujutsu developed among the samurai of feudal Japan as a method for defeating an armed and armored opponent in which one uses no weapon, or only a short weapon.[3] Because striking against an armored opponent proved ineffective, practitioners learned that the most efficient methods for neutralizing an enemy took the form of pins, joint locks, and throws. History[edit] Origins[edit] Development[edit] Description[edit]

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