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Jeet Kune Do

Jeet Kune Do
Jeet Kune Do, also Jeet Kun Do, and abbreviated JKD, is an eclectic and hybrid martial art system and philosophy of life founded by the martial artist Bruce Lee[2] (1940-1973) 1960 with simple and direct, or straightforward, movements and non-classical style. Jeet Kune Do practitioners believe in minimal movements with maximum effects and extreme speed. The system works by using different "tools" for different situations, where the situations are divided into ranges, which is kicking, punching, trapping, and grappling, where we use techniques to flow smoothly between them. It is referred to as "a style without style" or "the art of fighting without fighting" as said by Lee himself. Unlike more traditional martial arts, Jeet Kune Do is not fixed or patterned, and is a philosophy with guiding thoughts. It was named for the concept of interception or attacking while one's opponent is about to attack. System and philosophy[edit] Lee's philosophy[edit] Principles[edit] Straight lead[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeet_Kune_Do

Related:  martial arts

Zen Do Kai History[edit] The first Zen Do Kai dojo was opened at Elizabeth Street, Melbourne. Jones states that it was originally intended to cater for those who worked in the security industry.[1] Zen Do Kai follows the classical martial arts model with a distinct hierarchy, a philosophy and the promotion of the ethical code of Bushido. The web site of Bob Jones Corporation Pty Ltd claims that Zen Do Kai has clubs located in Australia, New Zealand and Israel.[2]

Pressure point The concept of pressure points is present in old school (17th century) Japanese martial arts and is claimed to have an even earlier history; in a 1942 article in the Shin Budo magazine, Takuma Hisa asserted the existence of a tradition attributing the first development of pressure-point attacks to Shinra Saburō Minamoto no Yoshimitsu (1045–1127).[2] Hancock and Higashi (1905) published a book which pointed out a number of vital points in Japanese martial arts.[3] Exaggerated accounts of pressure-point fighting appeared in Chinese Wuxia fiction and became known by the name of Dim Mak, or "Death Touch", in western popular culture in the 1960s.

Shaolin Kung Fu Shaolin Kung Fu refers to a collection of Chinese martial arts that claim affiliation with the Shaolin Monastery. Internal and external arts[edit] Huang Zongxi described martial arts in terms of Shaolin or "external" arts versus Wudang or internal arts in 1669.[1] It has been since then that Shaolin has been popularly synonymous for what are considered the external Chinese martial arts, regardless of whether or not the particular style in question has any connection to the Shaolin Monastery. Some say that there is no differentiation between the so-called internal and external systems of the Chinese martial arts,[2][3] while other well-known teachers have expressed differing opinions.

Jailhouse rock (fighting style) Jailhouse rock or JHR is a name which is used to describe a collection of different fighting styles that have been practiced and/or developed within US penal institutions. The different regional “styles” of JHR vary but share a common emphasis on improvisation governed by a specific set of underlying principles. Some examples of the many styles of JHR are 52 Hand Blocks, Brick City Rock, Comstock Style, Stato. Vale tudo Vale tudo (IPA: [ˈvali ˈtudu]; English: anything goes) are full-contact unarmed combat events, with a limited number of rules, that became popular in Brazil during the 20th century.[1] Vale Tudo has been considered a combat sport by some observers.[2] Vale Tudo uses techniques from many martial art styles, making it similar to modern mixed martial arts. History[edit] 1920s to 1980s[edit]

Defendu Defendu is a modern martial art developed by William E. Fairbairn and Eric A. Sykes prior to World War II. Muay Thai Muay Thai (Thai: มวยไทย, RTGS: Muai Thai, [mūaj.tʰāj] ( )) is a combat sport from the muay martial arts of Thailand that uses stand-up striking along with various clinching techniques.[1][2][3][4] This physical and mental discipline which includes combat on foot is known as "the art of eight limbs" because it is characterized by the combined use of fists, elbows, knees, shins and feet, being associated with a good physical preparation that makes a full-contact fighter very efficient.[5] Muay Thai became widespread internationally in the twentieth century, when practitioners defeated notable practitioners of other martial arts.[6] A professional league is governed by the World Muay Thai Council.[7][8] Etymology[edit]

Kajukenbo Kajukenbo is an American hybrid martial art. The name Kajukenbo comes from the original arts of which it was composed: KA for Karate, JU for Judo and Jujutsu, KEN for Kenpo and BO for Boxing. Today, Kajukenbo is practiced all over the world in many distinctive branches.[citation needed] Unlike many traditional martial arts, students are not required to mimic their teacher, but are encouraged to develop their own "expression" of the art. Each branch continues to evolve their training, adopting and taking in the techniques of many other martial arts. While different, each branch shares the view that self-preservation and defense is at their core.

Zui Quan Concept[edit] Zui quan is a category of techniques, forms and fighting philosophy that appear to imitate a drunkard's movements.[1] The postures are created by momentum and weight of the body, and imitation is generally through staggering and certain type of fluidity in the movements. It is considered to be among the most difficult wushu styles to learn due to the need for powerful joints and fingers. While in fiction practitioners of zui quan are often portrayed as being actually intoxicated, zui quan techniques are highly acrobatic and skilled and require a great degree of balance and coordination, such that any person attempting to perform any zui quan techniques while intoxicated would be likely to injure themselves.[2] Style[edit] Even though the style seems irregular and off balance it takes the utmost balance to be successful.

Jujutsu Jujutsu (/dʒuːˈdʒuːtsuː/; Japanese: 柔術, jūjutsu listen , Japanese pronunciation: [ˈdʑɯɯ.dʑɯ.tsɯ]) is a Japanese martial art and a method of close combat for defeating an armed and armored opponent in which one uses no weapon or only a short weapon.[1][2] The word jujutsu can be spelled as ju-jitsu/jujitsu, ju-jutsu. "Jū" can be translated to mean "gentle, soft, supple, flexible, pliable, or yielding." "Jutsu" can be translated to mean "art" or "technique" and represents manipulating the opponent's force against himself rather than confronting it with one's own force.[1] Jujutsu developed among the samurai of feudal Japan as a method for defeating an armed and armored opponent in which one uses no weapon, or only a short weapon.[3] Because striking against an armored opponent proved ineffective, practitioners learned that the most efficient methods for neutralizing an enemy took the form of pins, joint locks, and throws. History[edit]

Kenpō Kenpō (拳法?) is the name of several Japanese martial arts. The word kenpō is a Japanese translation of the Chinese word "quán fǎ". This term is also sometimes transliterated as "kempo", as a result of applying Traditional Hepburn romanization,[1] but failing to use a macron to indicate the long vowel. The generic nature of the term combined with its widespread, cross-cultural adoption in the martial arts community has led to many divergent definitions.[2] Marine Corps Martial Arts Program The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP, /ˈmɪkmæp/) is a combat system developed by the United States Marine Corps to combine existing and new hand-to-hand and close quarters combat (CQC) techniques with morale and team-building functions and instruction in the Warrior Ethos.[1] The program, which began in 2001, trains Marines (and U.S. Navy personnel attached to Marine units) in unarmed combat, edged weapons, weapons of opportunity, and rifle and bayonet techniques. It also stresses mental and character development, including the responsible use of force, leadership, and teamwork.

Monkey Kung Fu Monkey Kung Fu, or Monkey Fist (猴拳), is a Chinese martial art which utilizes ape or monkey-like movements as part of its technique. There are a number of independently developed systems of monkey kung fu. Examples include Xingzhemen (行者門) named after the protagonist Sun Wukong of the popular Ming dynasty novel Journey to the West, Nanhouquan (南猴拳) or Southern Monkey Fist originating from the Southern Shaolin Temple as well as the better-known Da Sheng Pi Gua Men 大聖劈掛門 style of Hong Kong. Origins[edit] Hou Quan[edit]

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