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22 Ways To Use Twitter For Learning Based On Bloom's Taxonomy

22 Ways To Use Twitter For Learning Based On Bloom's Taxonomy
Last year we created a “twitter spectrum,” an image that clarified different ways that twitter could be used in the classroom in (hopefully) authentic ways. TeachBytes has followed that up with an excellent graphic of their own that uses a pure Bloom’s Taxonomy approach. The specific ideas range from “remix trending tweets with video and music” to creating concept maps showing the relationship between tweets. We must admit to going back and forth over the exact fit of a social media platform like twitter in a formal (or informal) learning environment. Clearly it’s a great way to skim and monitor information streams, but just like we wouldn’t use sing Shakespearean sonnets to toddlers at birthday parties, using twitter as an in-depth critical thinking tool requires a bit of squinting, even as an Avante-garde 21st century learning tool. Unless you’re using it as a cultural survey of sorts. As with all things, sweet spot matters.

Twitter Co-Founder Evan Williams Lays Out His Plan For The Future Of Media Twitter Co-Founder Evan Williams has an ambitious new plan: to shift our daily reading habits away from consuming incremental news bites and towards engaging with enlightened ideas curated by an intelligent algorithm. Ordinarily, such a goal would seem utopian, were it not for the fact that Williams is among a handful of Internet pioneers who have disrupted the media industry multiple times. Before Twitter terraformed the landscape of news distribution, Williams’s first smash hit, Blogger, became the branded namesake for an upstart generation of amateur writers to challenge the established players Most importantly, Medium, his new platform for publishing mostly long-form content, has quickly garnered popularity — and infamy. In only a few months, its most popular contributions are making front-page headlines and snagging millions of views. In our Silicon Valley bubble, its contributors semi-regularly spark industry wide-conversations among the Internet elite. News “Crap” Vs. It’s true.

A Powerful App For Every Level Of Bloom's Taxonomy Bloom’s Taxonomy has been steadily increasing its presence in my everyday reads lately. The revised version is really speaking to a lot of educators who are using it – often in concert with a variety of technologies – to address the different levels of educational objectives. (Note: If you need a quick refresher on the basics of Bloom’s Taxonomy, check out this post). Using Apps There are a ton of apps out there that address different ideas in the Bloom’s Taxonomy hierarchy. Remembering Apps that fit into the ‘remembering’ bucket include those that improve a student’s ability to identify and recall facts, define terms and concepts, and locate information. Screen Chomp is a free app that is a basic doodling board with markers. Understanding The ‘understanding’ bucket should be filled with apps that allow students to explain concepts and ideas that they have come to understand. Applying SimpleMind is mind mapping app that students (and teachers!) Analyzing Evaluating Creating

Leadership Basics: What to Do When You Don't Have All the Answers Leaders are supposed to be all knowing -- at least when it comes to their own company -- aren't they? That's why the three most hated words in leadership are simply: "I don't know." After all, if the leader doesn't know, who does? Of course no one is expected to have all the answers. There are benefits to admitting you don't have the answers asked of you. But that doesn't make admitting you don't know what to do any easier. 1. 2. When you think "who," focus on three things: understanding, experience and expertise. Two cautions: First, beware of the faux expert who has lots of ideas but is short on real-world experience. 3. 4. Leading your team into the future is never risk free, but there is consolation in knowing there are some smart things you can do, even when you don't know what to do. The author is an Entrepreneur contributor. Mark Sanborn is an author, speaker and president of Sanborn & Associates Inc., a leadership development firm based in Lonetree, Colo.

Twitter for Professional Development One of best and worst things about teaching today is the unbelievably unfathomable amount of online resources, tools, websites, lesson plans, and overall good stuff for teaching and learning. However, there are only so many hours and minutes in the day to spend researching and finding resources that are relevant to your life as a teacher. How do you keep up with it all? There is nothing better than having a good group of “goto” people that you can turn to with questions about resources, bounce ideas off of for lessons and projects, and collaborate with on a regular basis. Twitter to the rescue! In addition to just following educators and others with the same interests as you, there are several different hashtags that you can follow that revolve around the educational realm.

Facebook and Twitter Are Converging Facebook and Twitter used to be distinctly different places to socialize online. One was public to the world, the other (mostly) just between friends. One was a place for news from your social circle, the other more about public events and discussion. One was dominated by images and multimedia, the other sparse and text-centric. Over the past year those distinctions have broken down. Facebook’s most recent borrowings from Twitter are blatant. Going the other way, Twitter recently introduced a redesign of how conversations are displayed. Facebook and Twitter’s collision course seems more driven by their rush to make money from ads than an effort to fulfill the needs of their users. There’s not much data available to show whether this plagiarism campaign is working for the two companies (although early figures suggest hashtags don’t work on Facebook).

A Juicy Collection of Bloom's Digital Taxonomies! Today, educators are overwhelmed (literally drowning!) by thousands of web 2.0/social media/apps that they can use for learning and teaching. But, where/how to start? How do we choose the right solution for a particular learning context or activity? The LMS can certainly not solve all our learning and teaching needs and requirements. Actually, compared to some of the amazing learning possibilities out there, most LMS I have explored (especially Moodle and Blackboard) are not only very limited, but used alone can even kill creative expression and learning in so many ways. One way to find the right tool (or app) for a learning context/activity/situation, is to look through the eyes of Bloom's taxonomy. But, please keep in mind that many tools/apps can easily be used for all the levels of Bloom's taxonomy with an open and creative mindset. Here is a collection of Bloom's digital taxonomies that I have discovered until now: Updated version (2014): Old Version: Source Source Source

How To Effectively Use The Top 4 Social Networks Have you ever wondered why you need to be a member of the top 4 social networks: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and the whole host of other social networking sites that your friend invite you to be a part of? Maybe you should only join Facebook. Or maybe Google+ would be the better option. Doesn’t everyone end up connected in all of the same places anyway? Well, the short version of the answer is no. Mom This is How Twitter Works Infinity and beyond » Ylva Lindberg Have you seen this? Very elegant. But still. Yes Youtube is an infinite space (time? Likewise with data. 50 years of teenagers performing their favourite songs on acoustic guitar uploaded on Youtube today, or 500 years? is it a generational thing, a symbol for people feeling digital culture moving them from static(-ish) to fluent, from order to chaos, from hierarchical structure to (sorry!) * On the other hand, that sounds just like something a child could be interested in.

4 Visual Guides To Bloom's Taxonomy Apps Yesterday, we looked at an overview of the old and revised versions of Bloom’s taxonomy. We talked a little bit about categorizing current classroom activities to see which of Bloom’s objectives you’re addressing (whether intentionally or unintentionally). Today, we’re looking at some apps and web tools that address the Bloom’s taxonomy objectives – helping bring Mr. There are a ton of great lists out there that showcase many (many, many) apps and digital tools that address the objectives. Rather than reinventing the wheel here, we’ll start by looking at a few lists compiled by different folks along the way. Next, we have a graphic formatted in the same way as the revised taxonomy. Next up, a visually pleasing peacock. Kathy Schrock always puts together great lists of tools that address Bloom’s – here is just one of them.

Leadership, not Process, is the Keystone of Innovation To think differently, act differently. For most, easier said than done. I’ve stressed this over and over again. And will keep on stressing it because I know we’ll never get over it. Simply put, there are those that seek new thoughts before taking action. So, everyone seeks new thoughts about innovation thinking. Again, that means not just thinking differently, but also acting differently. Last week I wrote about how there is a lot of focus on innovation methodologies, but not so much on the leadership part. This is because methodologies spread easily. Mindset precedes methodology The sad thing is that when a company is considering hiring service providers that provide innovation capability their criteria is based on specialization on a specific methodology. Wishful thinking, I know. Although I think methodologies like design thinking are great because it is about putting the customer at the center of what you do, a methodology doesn’t equal mindset. Scale leadership, not process Wait!

How to Use Twitter to Grow Your PLN For many people, Twitter conjures up the worst of the internet: disjointed, meaningless phrases, unrecognizable abbreviations, and endless drivel about where someone's getting their double mocha today. So, Why Tweet?!?! For the inquisitive educator, there are some jewels herein that can lead to stimulating discussions, new resources, and an ongoing supportive network. To that end, here is a list of educationally focused chats that we recommend (listed by day): Chat for educators teaching 4th grade #4thchat Mondays 8pm ET/5pm PT/7pm CT Chat for educators teaching social studies #sschat Mondays 7pm ET/4pm PT/6pm CT Chat for music educators #musedchat Mondays 8pm ET/5pm PT Chat for ELL educators #ellchat Mondays 9pm ET/6pm PT Kindergarten Chat #kinderchat Mondays 9pm ET/6pm PT General education chat #edchat Tuesdays 12 noon ET/ 9am PT 7pm ET/4pm PT Chat for science educators #scichat Tuesdays 9pm ET/6pm PT Chat for new and pre-service teachers #ntchat Wednesdays 8pm ET/5pm PT Set up an account

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