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100-Year-Old Way to Filter Rainwater in a Barrel

100-Year-Old Way to Filter Rainwater in a Barrel
During our boiling, broiling, blistering summer of 2012 here in the Missouri Ozarks, water was a topic of conversation wherever we went. Creeks and ponds dried up (some never recovered) and the water table dropped, forcing a few neighbors to have their well pumps lowered or to even have deeper wells drilled. Many folks shared memories of rain barrels, cisterns, hand pumps and drawing water with a well bucket as a child, usually on grandpa and grandma’s farm. Some said they’d never want to rely again on those old-time methods of getting water. But, at least they knew how it was done. It seems we have lost much practical knowledge in the last 50 or so years because we thought we’d never need it again. A tattered, 4-inch thick, 1909 book I happily secured for $8 in a thrift store reveals, among umpteen-thousand other every-day skills, how to make homemade water filters. The “wholesome” observation applies to plants, too. 100-year-old instructions Free online reading

http://www.theprepperjournal.com/2013/07/11/100-year-old-way-to-filter-rainwater-in-a-barrel/

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