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Play: Where Learning Begins!

Play: Where Learning Begins!
Browse this selection of articles on play based learning from Young Children and Teaching Young Children. Assessing and Scaffolding Make Believe Play: Mature make-believe play provides unique learning opportunities Read more » Chopsticks and Counting Chips: Play and foundational skills don’t need to compete for the teacher's attention Read more » Playdough - What's Standard about It?: Using playdough to address early learning standards Read more » Block Building and Make-Believe for Every Child: Encouraging boys and girls to try out the learning centers they don’t usually visit Read more » Block Off Time for Learning: When children play with blocks, they learn math, literacy, social skills and so much more Read more» Recess—It’s Indispensable: Test scores do not improve when recess is cut Read more » Why Do Babies Like Boxes Best?

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Related:  Play Based LearningIt's All About PlayFreya's ResourcesPlay

Do You Give Yourself Permission to Play? Play is usually discussed as though it were a relief from serious learning. But for children, play is serious learning. It’s a way to cope with life and to prepare for adulthood. Playing is a way to solve problems and to express feelings. In fact, play is not only the real work of childhood; it should also be considered seriously as the real work of every organization. This is important to consider amidst the hustle and bustle of our busy lives. All Work and No Play: Why Your Kids Are More Anxious, Depressed - Esther Entin For more than fifty years, children's free play time has been continually declining, and it's keeping them from turning into confident adults What are your memories of playing as a child? Some of us will remember hide and seek, house, tag, and red rover red rover. Others may recall arguing about rules in kickball or stick ball or taking turns at jump rope, or creating imaginary worlds with our dolls, building forts, putting on plays, or dressing-up. From long summer days to a few precious after-school hours, kid-organized play may have filled much of your free time. But what about your children?

The Mud Kitchen - A Recipe for marvellous Outdoor play Hello lovely blog visitors. Welcome! I am sharing the newest edition to Dimples out door play area today. The awesome and totally messy mud kitchen. The best recipe for engaging children in messy, active, outdoor learning is with mud. Here is the DIY mud kitchen that we built for Dimples in a few hours using recycled materials. Battling the Boys: Educators Grapple with Violent Play In her 30 years as a kindergarten teacher in Illinois and Massachusetts, Jane Katch has watched graham crackers, a pretzel, celery, tree bark and fingers all become transformed into imaginary guns and other weapons. And she has learned to work with, rather than against, the violent boyhood fantasies that accompany these transformations. "When you try to ignore it, it doesn't go away. And when you try to oppress it, it comes out in sneaky ways," Katch said.

Ms. Conway's Kindergarten Website: About Play-Based Learning It has long been known that there is a strong link between play and learning. Children are full of natural curiosity and they explore this curiosity through play. When kids are playing, it's the perfect time to learn. Play teaches kids how to problem solve, how to make friends, how to express themselves, how to enjoy the world around them, and how to recognize letters and numbers. All of these skills form the foundation of a love of learning. In the kindergarten program, teachers structure play to create learning moments.

Why Kindergarten in Finland Is All About Playtime (and Why That Could Be More Stimulating Than the Common Core) “The changes to kindergarten make me sick,” a veteran teacher in Arkansas recently admitted to me. “Think about what you did in first grade—that’s what my 5-year-old babies are expected to do.” The difference between first grade and kindergarten may not seem like much, but what I remember about my first-grade experience in the mid-90s doesn’t match the kindergarten she described in her email: three and a half hours of daily literacy instruction, an hour and a half of daily math instruction, 20 minutes of daily “physical activity time” (officially banned from being called “recess”) and two 56-question standardized tests in literacy and math—on the fourth week of school. That American friend—who teaches 20 students without an aide—has fought to integrate 30 minutes of “station time” into the literacy block, which includes “blocks, science, magnetic letters, play dough with letter stamps to practice words, books, and storytelling.”

Play as pedagogy - Early Learning " Education is what the child does in order to discover........it is not about pouring information into an empty vessel." David Attenborough, Enough Rope, ABC TV June 16th, 2008 Learning through play As Schools Cut Recess, Kids' Learning Will Suffer, Experts Say When Deborah Gilboa's second-oldest son Nadav started coming home from first grade with discipline warnings from his teacher, Gilboa and her husband were perplexed. Nadav, who had just turned 6, had the same teacher in kindergarten and had rarely gotten into trouble. So Gilboa, a family medicine doctor in Pittsburgh who consults at askdoctorg.com, and her husband sat down to ask their son what was going on.

Could this be the most play-literate PR video ever? A couple of weeks ago the UK laundry brand Persil (known in many parts of the world as Omo) released a set of short videos called ‘Kids Today’. The aim is to give parents insights into the intrinsic value of play, using ‘point of view’ cameras to bring the viewer closer to the world as seen through children’s eyes. Here is the first, entitled ‘Play Face’. The video sequences have some conventional scenes of children playing sports and ball games.

Why so many kids can’t sit still in school today The Centers for Disease Control tells us that in recent years there has been a jump in the percentage of young people diagnosed with Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder, commonly known as ADHD: 7.8 percent in 2003 to 9.5 percent in 2007 and to 11 percent in 2011. The reasons for the rise are multiple, and include changes in diagnostic criteria, medication treatment and more awareness of the condition. In the following post, Angela Hanscom, a pediatric occupational therapist and the founder of TimberNook, a nature-based development program designed to foster creativity and independent play outdoors in New England, suggests yet another reason more children are being diagnosed with ADHD, whether or not they really have it: the amount of time kids are forced to sit while they are in school. This appeared on the TimberNook blog. State-based Prevalence Data of ADHD Diagnosis (2011-2012): Children CURRENTLY diagnosed with ADHD (Centers for Disease Control)

Why play-based learning? ' ... for the EYLF to be implemented properly, all early childhood educators need to know what play is, why it is important, how to implement and assess a play-based program and their role in it.' Questioning practice The Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) is built on the understanding that the principles of early childhood pedagogy (DEEWR, 2009, pp. 12-13) guide the practice of early childhood educators. buffettinstitute.nebraska.edu/research/early-childhood-education/learning-from-birth-age-8.aspx Among the research facilities focusing on young children is the Ruth Staples Child Development Laboratory at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The CDL has both laboratories and classrooms equipped with video recording equipment, enabling researchers to collect data and assess interactions that lead to new knowledge about children’s development and relationships, families, and teacher education. The lab is an educational resource for future teachers, pairing master teachers with students pursuing a degree in early childhood education. The value of play in early childhood development is the focus of researchers at the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

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