background preloader

Hippocampus: Homework and Study Help

Hippocampus: Homework and Study Help
Can I take a course at HippoCampus for credit? How do I enroll in a course at HippoCampus? Are there any fees to take your courses? How do I make a comment or ask a question? How do I get individual help with my homework assignment? What are the preferred texts? How can I use HippoCampus in my classroom? How can I use HippoCampus in my home school? Can I use the resources you have available for my homeschoolers? Do you know of any wet lab resources to accompany HippoCampus content? Is there a script, app, or something that can be used to track student use of HippoCampus? Can I share my HippoCampus content with my fellow teachers? Can I download the video? Can I change the size of the video window? Why won't the Environmental Science animations play? What if my page scroll bars or "submit" button are not showing? I can't find closed captioning. Where does the content from your site come from? There is an error in the multimedia presentation. How do I report a course errata item? Smart Science, LabPaq,

http://www.hippocampus.org/HippoCampus/

Related:  All subjectsTeacher ResourcesPBL Resources

How to Turn a Classroom Research Project into an Infographic Conveying information in a striking, concise way has never been more important, and infographics are the perfect pedagogical tool with which to do so. Below, you’ll find my experience with designing an infographic-friendly classroom research project, explained in a step-by-step process you can implement in your own classroom. Familiarize Students With the Infographic Concept Photo credit: visual.ly After hearing all the buzz about infographics in education, I thought I’d experiment with the concept in my seventh-grade accelerated English class. I wanted to ease my students into the idea, so we first spent time researching infographics — what they are, how they work, and what kind of information is best conveyed by the medium.

Inquiry in the Classroom: 7 Simple Tools To Get You Started We know certain characteristics can be encouraged, but not taught, like curiosity. But teachers who use an inquiry based approach can provide techniques that help students learn the questions to ask that may spark a natural interest. Image from Flickr via David Woo Why Use the Inquiry Cycle? Often used by science professionals to work through problems and research, an inquiry-based approach, or inquiry cycle, is also used in classrooms for scientific and non-scientific topics to encourage students during the learning process. The Center for Inspired Teaching, an organization that provides teacher training, explains that in an inquiry-based approach, teachers help students generate their own appropriate questions and guide the investigation.

The Whittier, Alaska Artificial Reef - Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies A 3-5 Week Science Unit for Grades 4-6 This teaching unit focuses on the ecology and importance of high-latitude rocky reefs as a habitat for marine life and the potential of artificial reefs to mitigate, or compensate, for negative impacts on marine habitats that result from human activities. It culminates with a student role-play of the federal permtting process to consider ecological and social trade-offs about permitting the loss of habitat and determining the appropriate mitigation strategy. The teaching unit is the result of an experiment in Prince William Sound, Alaska.

20 Of The Best Study Apps For The Plugged-In Student Via TeachThought Teaching and learning through technology is a complex thing. Learning what, from whom, and why? Jane's Pick of the Day: 25 places to find instructional videos Recently I have received a number of emails asking about places that offer free instructional videos (on all subjects), so I thought I would put together a posting of the main ones that I know about: 5min Life Videopedia - instructional and how-to videos Academic Earth - Thousands of video lectures from the world's top scholarsblip.tv - next generation TV networkGoogle Video - videos on all topics Graspr - The instructional video network Howcast - How-to videos iCue - A fun, innovative, learning environment built around video from the NBC News ArchivesInstructables - Make, HowTo and DIY iTunes U - Faculty are using iTunes U to distribute digital lessons to their students, e.g Stangord, Trinity College Dublin, etc.

More Progressive Ways to Measure Deeper Levels of Learning How do we measure learning beyond knowledge of content? Finding that winning combination of criteria can prove to be a complicated and sometimes difficult process. Schools that are pushing boundaries are learning that it takes time, a lot of conversation, and a willingness to let students participate in that evaluation.

Tree of Life Web Project The Tree of Life Web Project (ToL) is a collaborative effort of biologists and nature enthusiasts from around the world. On more than 10,000 World Wide Web pages, the project provides information about biodiversity, the characteristics of different groups of organisms, and their evolutionary history (phylogeny). Each page contains information about a particular group, e.g., salamanders, segmented worms, phlox flowers, tyrannosaurs, euglenids, Heliconius butterflies, club fungi, or the vampire squid. ToL pages are linked one to another hierarchically, in the form of the evolutionary tree of life.

Technology Integration Matrix The Technology Integration Matrix (TIM) illustrates how teachers can use technology to enhance learning for K-12 students. The TIM incorporates five interdependent characteristics of meaningful learning environments: active, constructive, goal directed (i.e., reflective), authentic, and collaborative (Jonassen, Howland, Moore, & Marra, 2003). The TIM associates five levels of technology integration (i.e., entry, adoption, adaptation, infusion, and transformation) with each of the five characteristics of meaningful learning environments.

Apply for a Teacher Travel Grant This Summer Summer is the perfect time to research and apply for a teacher travel grant. The key is to look in the right places and write a compelling application. Then, once you win an award, you might find yourself kayaking the length of the Mississippi River while developing a river ecology unit.

Related: