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12 Laws of the Emotions

12 Laws of the Emotions
Explore the psychology of the emotions with these 12 laws. We tend to think of our emotions as having laws unto themselves, but one psychological researcher has suggested that our emotions do follow certain general rules. Professor Nico Frijda puts forward twelve laws of the emotions (Fridja, 2006). As with most laws there are exceptions, but these have been synthesised from years of psychological research and hold true much of the time. 1. The first law is simply that emotions derive from situations. 2. We feel because we care about something, when we have some interest in what happens, whether it’s to an object, ourselves, or another person. 3. Whatever seems real to us, can elicit an emotional response. 4, 5 & 6. The law of habituation means that in life we get used to our circumstances whatever they are (mostly true, but see laws 7 & 8). 7. There are certain awful circumstances to which we can never become accustomed. 8. 9. The way we respond to our emotions tends to be absolute. 10. Related:  psychologyEmotional Self-AwarenessSoon Joon

18 Behaviors of Emotionally Intelligent People When emotional intelligence (EQ) first appeared to the masses, it served as the missing link in a peculiar finding: people with average IQs outperform those with the highest IQs 70 percent of the time. This anomaly threw a massive wrench into the broadly held assumption that IQ was the sole source of success. Decades of research now point to emotional intelligence as being the critical factor that sets star performers apart from the rest of the pack. The connection is so strong that 90 percent of top performers have high emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is the "something" in each of us that is a bit intangible. Despite the significance of EQ, its intangible nature makes it difficult to measure and to know what to do to improve it if you're lacking. You have a robust emotional vocabulary. All people experience emotions, but it is a select few who can accurately identify them as they occur. You're curious about people. You embrace change. You know your strengths and weaknesses.

untitled Are you emotionally intelligent? Here’s how to know for sure When emotional intelligence (EQ) first appeared to the masses, it served as the missing link in a peculiar finding: people with average IQs outperform those with the highest IQs 70 per cent of the time. This anomaly threw a massive wrench into the broadly held assumption that IQ was the sole source of success. Decades of research now point to emotional intelligence as being the critical factor that sets star performers apart from the rest of the pack. Emotional intelligence is the “something” in each of us that is a bit intangible. Despite the significance of EQ, its intangible nature makes it very difficult to know how much you have and what you can do to improve if you’re lacking. Unfortunately, quality (scientifically valid) EQ tests aren’t free. You have a robust emotional vocabulary All people experience emotions, but it is a select few who can accurately identify them as they occur. You’re curious about people You embrace change More from Entrepreneur.com You are difficult to offend

Relationships Take Work If I could give one piece of advice as a relationships researcher, it would be this: Relationships take work. Sure we’d all like to believe in destiny, thinking there is someone out there who is meant for us. Then when we find our soul mate, we will slip into an easy and comfortable companionship that provides us with decades of endless laughter and joy, and not a single fight or tense moment. But that is the stuff of dreams, people. In a great test of what happens when people believe they are "meant to be", close relationships researcher C. Destiny Beliefs. Growth Beliefs. Importantly, these two sets of beliefs are not mutually exclusive. But if you are someone who is high in destiny or growth beliefs, this might affect how you (a) approach your dating life, (b) deal with problems in your relationship, and (c) think about relationships after they end. Approach to dating. Dealing with problems. Ending the relationship. Dealing with the aftermath. The Articles:Knee, C.

Understand the brain function problems that explain mental illness There are three crucial functions to the human brain and how each part works and relates to each other part can explain how many serious mental problems arise. These parts are Conscious Executing, Unconscious Processing and Flight & Fight. Conscious Executing Left hemisphere (CE.L) and Right hemisphere (CE.R) This is the pre-frontal cortex which processes imagination and cognition where emotions are under control and so are consciously useful. It is the slowest of the three levels of the brain. Each hemisphere of the prefrontal cortex processes differently. Unconscious processing (UP) This is the Default Network. Flight & Fight (FF) This is the primitive brain and Limbic system, where emotional responses are crude, automatic and overwhelming. Understanding the relationships between these three brain functions or parts – the blue/grey, green and pink/red - is to understand much mental distress and "mental illness”. A normal emotionally healthy brain has a good balance between all three.

Developing Emotional Awareness: Recognizing & Harnessing Your Emotions We often hear from people who feel overwhelmed by stress, family, work and relationship problems, health challenges, and painful emotions. They’ve tried many approaches to help themselves feel better, but they just can’t seem to follow through, or what they’ve done hasn't helped them enough. If this sounds familiar, you know that it’s all too easy to become discouraged when you’re stuck. The problem is not willpower—all the willpower in the world won’t matter if you can’t manage stress or keep your emotions in balance. The good news: you can learn these important emotional skills, no matter your age or the obstacles you face. Skill building, like any learning, takes time and effort.

Understanding Stress: Symptoms, Signs, Causes, and Effects What is stress? The Body’s Stress Response When you perceive a threat, your nervous system responds by releasing a flood of stress hormones, including adrenaline and cortisol. These hormones rouse the body for emergency action. Your heart pounds faster, muscles tighten, blood pressure rises, breath quickens, and your senses become sharper. Stress is a normal physical response to events that make you feel threatened or upset your balance in some way. The stress response is the body’s way of protecting you. The stress response also helps you rise to meet challenges. But beyond a certain point, stress stops being helpful and starts causing major damage to your health, your mood, your productivity, your relationships, and your quality of life. How do you respond to stress? It's important to learn how to recognize when your stress levels are out of control. The signs and symptoms of stress overload can be almost anything. Stress doesn’t always look stressful Signs and symptoms of stress overload

How A War Hero Became A Serial Bank Robber What an Introvert Sounds Like The World Well-Being Project uses Facebook updates to correlate language with personality traits. Do our Facebook posts reflect our true personalities? Incrementally, probably not. But in aggregate, the things we say on social media paint a fairly accurate portrait of our inner selves. The so-called “World Well-Being Project” started as an effort to gauge happiness across various states and communities. “Governments have an increased interest in measuring not just economic outcomes but other aspects of well-being,” said Andrew Schwartz, a UPenn computer scientist who works on the project. For the studies, Schwartz and his co-authors asked people to download a Facebook app called “My Personality.” Then, through a process called differential language analysis, they isolate the words that are most strongly correlated with a certain gender, age, trait, or place. Words Used by Introverts (top) vs. Openness (top) and Non-Openness Word Correlations

Signs That You Lack Emotional Intelligence Executive Summary Often, emotional intelligence is the key differentiator between a star performer and the rest of the pack, yet many never embrace the skill for themselves. Do you think being liked at work is overrated? Are you surprised when others are offended by your comments, and do you feel like they’re overreacting? You might be lacking in emotional intelligence, but there are strategies to help you improve. A critical component of emotional intelligence is self-awareness, so get feedback to help you understand what your problematic behaviors are. In my ten years as an executive coach, I have never had someone raise his hand and declare that he needs to work on his emotional intelligence. Take Craig (not his real name), a coaching client of mine, who showed tremendous potential and a strong ability to drive results for his company. Here are some of the telltale signs that you need to work on your emotional intelligence: So what do you do if you recognized yourself in this list?

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