background preloader

Global cities of the future: An interactive map

Global cities of the future: An interactive map
Over the next 13 years, 600 cities will account for nearly 65 percent of global GDP growth. Which of them will contribute the largest number of children or elderly to the world’s population? Which will rank among the top 25 cities by per capita GDP? How will regional patterns of growth differ? Explore these questions by browsing through this revised and updated interactive global map below, which contains city-specific highlights from the McKinsey Global Institute’s database of more than 2,600 metropolitan areas around the world. You’ll see why growth strategies focused at the country level may fall short in the future: with new hot spots emerging and household wealth surging in little-known urban centers, companies may have to adopt a much finer-grained approach to tap into the growth that lies ahead. Interactive

http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/economic_studies/global_cities_of_the_future_an_interactive_map

Related:  Tomorrow / Smart / Future

The city of 2050 Sensor networks Experts predict that everything, from street furniture to roads to the homes we live in, will be connected to the network. All these objects will produce vast amounts of data and some cities may build Nasa-style control centres to make predictions about city life, including where crimes may be committed. Smart buildings Buildings will have taken on a life of their own, controlling heating, lighting and security with little human intervention. 14 Bloom's Taxonomy Posters For Teachers 14 Brilliant Bloom’s Taxonomy Posters For Teachers by TeachThought Staff Bloom’s Taxonomy is a useful tool for assessment design, but using it only for that function is like using a race car to go to the grocery–a huge waste of potential. In an upcoming post we’re going to look at better use of Bloom’s taxonomy in the classroom, but during research for that post it became interesting how many variations there are of the original work. While a handful of the charts below only show aesthetic changes compared to others, most are concept maps of sorts–with graphic design that signifies extended function (power verbs), detail (clear explanations), or features of some sort (Bloom’s Taxonomy tasks by level). The follow simple, student-centered Bloom’s graphics were created by helloliteracy!

The new growth frontier: Midsize cities in emerging markets - McKinsey Quarterly - Marketing - Sectors & Regions Senior executives searching for growth face a stark new reality: roughly 400 midsize cities in emerging markets—cities they mostly will have never heard of—are posed to generate nearly 40 percent of global growth over the next 15 years. That’s more growth than the combined total of all developed economies plus the emerging markets’ megacities (those with populations of more than ten million, such as Mumbai, São Paulo, and Shanghai), which together have been the historic focus of most multinationals. Learning about consumer attitudes in the emerging markets’ “middleweight” cities (three-quarters of which have less than two million people), figuring out market entry strategies for them, and deciding how to allocate resources within and across them will all be crucial priorities in the years ahead. New research from the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) seeks to arm executives with the knowledge they’ll need to tap into global urban growth. Interactive

The Next Step in Building Better Cities? This post is also available in: Chinese (Traditional) By Carren Jao – an art, architecture and design writer based in Manila and Los Angeles. Her work has been spotted on Core77, Dwell, Surface Asia and Fast Co.Design. You can find her online and on Twitter. The 10 Smartest Cities In The World We all have our favorite cities, and our subjective reasons for choosing them. They make us happy, keep us entertained, look beautiful at night. Whatever it is. The Cities In Motion Index doesn't care about that. It has objective data: 50 sets of it in all, covering every facet of urban life, from the economy and governance to technology and urban planning. A dozen public accounting ideas that don't work anymore I recently heard an excellent sermon on the importance of letting go of the past so that we can each pursue our intended future. The speaker referred to a book by Robin Meyers in which he asserts that there may be an eighth deadly sin: nostalgia. From what I gathered, Meyers suggests that we go astray when we believe that “the vices of the present prove not only that all is now in disarray but that this ‘awful’ age is inherently inferior to some golden age that came before it.” When I heard these assertions, I was overwhelmed because they crystalized an issue that seems to plague so many CPA firm leaders: an attachment to some bygone “good old days” that might not have even been that good. When we focus on what’s “wrong with today’s (fill in the blank),” it allows us to delay making the significant—almost radical—changes needed to address modern realities and embrace a future when things will be very different.

Redes Sensoriales Inalámbricas - ZigBee - Mesh Networks Smart Cities: sensor cities that interact with us in a smart way January 19th, 2011 - Alicia Asín The concept of city is changing as we knew it. The new technologies transform the cities into an entity capable of intelligently manage the water used to irrigate parks and gardens, measuring the amount of contamination in the air, or even generate alerts according to the level of dangerousness of the solar rays. Optimizing the amount of water used in irrigation of parks and gardens, managing the lighting in a smart way, providing an information system of free parking spaces or water leaks in pipes are problems common to most cities: they all could be treated with an intelligent monitoring system that would help in the daily management of resources.

9 City-Building Projects to Watch For in 2013 This is a community post, untouched by our editors. For the first time in history, there are more people living in urban areas than there are in rural areas, which by 2030, are expected to support almost 5 billion people. Cities are swelling to unprecedented sizes. Robots Aren't the Problem: It's Us - The Chronicle Review By Richard Florida Swikar Patel for The Chronicle Review Everyone has an opinion about technology. Depending on whom you ask, it will either: a) Liberate us from the drudgery of everyday life, rescue us from disease and hardship, and enable the unimagined flourishing of human civilization; or b) Take away our jobs, leave us broke, purposeless, and miserable, and cause civilization as we know it to collapse.

Tomorrow's cities: Rio de Janeiro's bid to become a smart city 8 September 2013Last updated at 21:09 ET By Jane Wakefield Technology reporter Rio: Latin America's first 'smart city'? Rio de Janeiro's famously chaotic favelas are as much a landmark of the city as the Christ statue or Sugarloaf Mountain but few would see them as the natural home to smart technologies. However, a remarkable project is under way that is already changing lives, and it is one of which the city government, keen to put Rio on the map as Latin America's first smart city, should take note.

Related: