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Awesome Chart for Teachers- Alternatives to Traditional Homework

Awesome Chart for Teachers- Alternatives to Traditional Homework
I just came across this chart somewhere online and find it really interesting and worth sharing with you here in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning. The chart is created by connectedprincipals and features some alternative ways to do "traditional' homework. I am not really sure the labelling of homework as traditional is a correct nomenclature or not because for me there is no such a thing called traditional homework, any work scheduled to be done at home is a homework. This is how I see it from my end. The alternative ways suggested here are important though. If you look at them analytically you will see that they center around actively engaging students in the learning task through a variety of ways including, critical thinking, brainstorming, concept mapping...etc. Have a look and share with us what you this of this work.

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/06/awesome-chart-for-teachers-alternatives.html

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