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9 Mental Math Tricks

9 Mental Math Tricks
Math can be terrifying for many people. This list will hopefully improve your general knowledge of mathematical tricks and your speed when you need to do math in your head. 1. Multiplying by 9, or 99, or 999 Multiplying by 9 is really multiplying by 10-1. So, 9×9 is just 9x(10-1) which is 9×10-9 which is 90-9 or 81. Let’s try a harder example: 46×9 = 46×10-46 = 460-46 = 414. One more example: 68×9 = 680-68 = 612. To multiply by 99, you multiply by 100-1. So, 46×99 = 46x(100-1) = 4600-46 = 4554. Multiplying by 999 is similar to multiplying by 9 and by 99. 38×999 = 38x(1000-1) = 38000-38 = 37962. 2. To multiply a number by 11 you add pairs of numbers next to each other, except for the numbers on the edges. Let me illustrate: To multiply 436 by 11 go from right to left. First write down the 6 then add 6 to its neighbor on the left, 3, to get 9. Write down 9 to the left of 6. Then add 4 to 3 to get 7. Then, write down the leftmost digit, 4. So, 436×11 = is 4796. Let’s do another example: 3254×11. 3. 4. 5.

Lots of Jokes - Funny Jokes, Pictures and Videos NBC Learn and Carnegie Learning, Inc. announced today that they are teaming up to produce "Decision 2012: Election Math" – a collection of free online math education resources related to the 2012 election season. Posted on 04/30/2012 12:09 PM NBC Learn, the educational arm of NBC News, and Carnegie Learning, Inc., a leader in research-based math programs for middle school, high school, and post-secondary students, today announced they are teaming up to produce "Decision 2012: Election Math" – a collection of free online math education resources related to the 2012 election season and developed especially for middle and high school teachers and students. "Decision 2012: Election Math" will appear as a Free Resources Special Collection with streaming videos on www.nbclearn.com and linked to interactive math problems on www.carnegielearning.com, beginning in Summer 2012. For full coverage, visit PR Newswire.

Octave GNU Octave is a high-level interpreted language, primarily intended for numerical computations. It provides capabilities for the numerical solution of linear and nonlinear problems, and for performing other numerical experiments. It also provides extensive graphics capabilities for data visualization and manipulation. Octave is normally used through its interactive command line interface, but it can also be used to write non-interactive programs. The Octave language is quite similar to Matlab so that most programs are easily portable. Octave is distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License. Version 4.0.0 has been released and is now available for download. An official Windows binary installer is also available from Thanks to the many people who contributed to this release!

Impress your friends with mental Math tricks » Fun Math Blog See Math tricks on video at the Wild About Math! mathcasts page. Being able to perform arithmetic quickly and mentally can greatly boost your self-esteem, especially if you don't consider yourself to be very good at Math. This article presents nine ideas that will hopefully get you to look at arithmetic as a game, one in which you can see patterns among numbers and pick then apply the right trick to quickly doing the calculation. The tricks in this article all involve multiplication. Don't be discouraged if the tricks seem difficult at first. As you learn and practice the tricks make sure you check your results by doing multiplication the way you're used to, until the tricks start to become second nature. 1. Multiplying by 9 is really multiplying by 10-1.So, 9x9 is just 9x(10-1) which is 9x10-9 which is 90-9 or 81. Let's try a harder example: 46x9 = 46x10-46 = 460-46 = 414. One more example: 68x9 = 680-68 = 612. 2. 3. Multiplying by 5 is just multiplying by 10 and then dividing by 2. 4. 5.

Welcome SCHOPENHAUER'S 38 STRATAGEMS, OR 38 WAYS TO WIN AN ARGUMENT Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), was a brilliant German philosopher. These 38 Stratagems are excerpts from "The Art of Controversy", first translated into English and published in 1896. Carry your opponent's proposition beyond its natural limits; exaggerate it. (abstracted from the book:Numerical Lists You Never Knew or Once Knew and Probably Forget, by: John Boswell and Dan Starer)

Mathway: Math Problem Solver Foldables/Study Guides Lose a foldable? All foldables & study guides that we have made in class are available below. If you need help filling in the blanks, please see the completed foldable or study guide in the classroom. Remember, many of these files were copied back-to-back, so a two-page file is the front and back of the foldable. 6th Grade Adding and Subtracting Fractions and Mixed Numbers (PDF 11 KB)Four-door foldable for operations with fractions. 6th Grade Multiplying and Dividing Fractions and Mixed Numbers (PDF 12 KB)Four-door foldable for operations with fractions. 6th Grade Decimals Foldable (PDF 43 KB)Four-door foldable for decimal operations 6th Grade Ratio, Rates, and Proportions (PDF 46 KB)This foldable gives definitions and examples of ratios, rates, and proportions. 6th Grade Proportions (PDF 32 KB)This foldable shows the steps needed to solve a proportion. 6th Grade Percents (PDF 70 KB)This tabbed-book is a great overview of percents. Mrs.

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