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Ela-teach-strat-read-text-6-12.pdf

Ela-teach-strat-read-text-6-12.pdf

Writing Editorials Overview of the Frameworks For ELA/Literacy The Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) developed the Model Content Frameworks for ELA/Literacy to help: Inform development of the PARCC assessments, andSupport implementation of the Common Core State Standards The PARCC Model Content Frameworks were developed through a state-led process that included ELA content experts in PARCC member states and members of the Common Core State Standards writing team. Although the primary purpose of the Model Content Frameworks is to provide a frame for the PARCC assessments, they also are voluntary resources to help educators and those developing curricula and instructional materials. The Model Content Frameworks illustrate one of a number of ways the standards could be organized over the course of the school year. The Model Content Framework for each grade level (grades 3–11) is divided into four sections: Literacy Standards for Other Disciplines and the Model Content Frameworks Conclusion

PassagBank.com - A Passage Search Engine for Teachers MLA Formatting and Style Guide Summary: MLA (Modern Language Association) style is most commonly used to write papers and cite sources within the liberal arts and humanities. This resource, updated to reflect the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (7th ed.) and the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (3rd ed.), offers examples for the general format of MLA research papers, in-text citations, endnotes/footnotes, and the Works Cited page. Contributors:Tony Russell, Allen Brizee, Elizabeth Angeli, Russell Keck, Joshua M. Please use the example at the bottom of this page to cite the Purdue OWL in MLA. To see a side-by-side comparison of the three most widely used citation styles, including a chart of all MLA citation guidelines, see the Citation Style Chart. You can also watch our MLA vidcast series on the Purdue OWL YouTube Channel. General Format MLA style specifies guidelines for formatting manuscripts and using the English language in writing. Paper Format General Guidelines Section Headings Essays 1.

Nine Strategies for Reaching All Learners in English Language Arts In order to maximize the benefits of ELT for students, I looked for ways to fine tune my approach to teaching individualized learning in my English language arts classroom. One of the instructional models that informs my approach to teaching individualized learning is the Readers and Writers Workshop. This approach proved very helpful in optimizing ELT. Readers and Writers Workshop: An Instructional Model The workshop model for English instruction combined with an extended 60 minutes of ELT support for my struggling students provides an excellent springboard to plan and implement individualized instruction in my class. Readers and Writers Workshop is an instructional model that focuses on students as learners, as well as readers and writers in practice. 1. This phase involves a teacher modeling a reading or writing strategy for the students to practice. 2. This is a student work time allocated for practicing the modeled strategy. 3. Reaching All Learners in the ELA Classroom 1. 2. 3. 4.

Articles of the Week (AoW) Please note that, as I explain in-depth in this blog post, I take no credit for coming up with the article of the week (AoW) assignment. Kelly Gallagher (or, as I sometimes call him, The Gallagher) is the man who first introduced me to the idea through his must-read book Readicide. Thus, anything I share about my classroom’s experiences with AoWs, any theories or experiments I try out with the assignment, and any success my students or I have with it thoroughly and ultimately traces back to Kelly’s work. Here’s the list from this school year: “”Follow Your Bliss” Advice,” from The Week. If you have an AoW you’ve used this year that you’d like to share, contact me — I’d love to post it for the good of the community. Here’s the list for this school year: “American Prisoner in North Korea Requests Rescue,” by Choe Sang-Hun for the New York Times. Below is a list of articles I prepared for the 2012-2013 school year. Ready to Dominate Articles of the Week?

Inferring How and Why Characters Change ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More Teacher Resources by Grade Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Classroom Resources › Lesson Plans Lesson Plan Student Objectives Session 1. Session 2. Session 3. Extensions Student Assessment/Reflections Students will Infer character traitsSupport inferences with evidence from the textInfer how a character changes across a textExplain why that character may have changed back to top Session 1. Session 2. Session 3. Provide students with a short story in which a character changes.

Teaching Shakespeare's Julius Caesar: Common Core-Style For the first eight years of my teaching career, my Shakespare daily lesson plans went something like this: "Good morning! Turn to Act II Scene 1 on page 234. I'm going to push play on the CD, let's listen to a few lines..." (Actors performing while students follow along for about 30 seconds. Pause CD.) Once in awhile, I would have the students act out a scene or two... but that usually led to monotone recitations and awkward moments helping students pronounce words. I think many people would relate to these methods. We were studying the play a mile wide and an inch deep. This year, my English II colleague Blake Revelle and I decided to try something completely different when we taught Julius Caesar. We felt like the answer was clear: In 10 years, it will be far more important for our students to know how to annotate, analyze and explain a complex text they have to read for work or college, rather than be able to answer plot questions or create a poster with all of the characters. Monday

Document Analysis Worksheets Document analysis is the first step in working with primary sources. Teach your students to think through primary source documents for contextual understanding and to extract information to make informed judgments. Use these worksheets — for photos, written documents, artifacts, posters, maps, cartoons, videos, and sound recordings — to teach your students the process of document analysis. Follow this progression: The first few times you ask students to work with primary sources, and whenever you have not worked with primary sources recently, model careful document analysis using the worksheets. Don’t stop with document analysis though. Materials created by the National Archives and Records Administration are in the public domain. These worksheets were revised in February, 2017.

The Art of Being Right The Art of Being Right: 38 Ways to Win an Argument (1831) (Eristische Dialektik: Die Kunst, Recht zu Behalten) is an acidulous and sarcastic treatise written by the German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer in sarcastic deadpan.[1] In it, Schopenhauer examines a total of thirty-eight methods of showing up one's opponent in a debate. He introduces his essay with the idea that philosophers have concentrated in ample measure on the rules of logic, but have not (especially since the time of Immanuel Kant) engaged with the darker art of the dialectic, of controversy. Whereas the purpose of logic is classically said to be a method of arriving at the truth, dialectic, says Schopenhauer, "...on the other hand, would treat of the intercourse between two rational beings who, because they are rational, ought to think in common, but who, as soon as they cease to agree like two clocks keeping exactly the same time, create a disputation, or intellectual contest." Publication[edit] A. Synopsis[edit]

Greek and Roman Mythology About the Course Myths are traditional stories that have endured over a long time. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Course Syllabus Week 1: Homer, epic poetry, and Trojan legends Week 2: Heroes and suffering Week 3: This World and other ones Week 4: Identity and signs Week 5: Gods and humans Week 6: Religion and ritual Week 7: Justice Week 8: Unstable selves Week 9: Writing myth in history Week 10: From myths to mythology Recommended Background No special background is needed other than the willingness and ability to synthesize complex texts and theoretical material. In-course Textbooks As a student enrolled in this course, you will have free access to selected chapters and content for the duration of the course. Suggested Readings We will be covering the following in class: Greek Tragedies, Vol. Course Format

Famous Novelists on Symbolism in Their Work and Whether It Was Intentional Eric Carle's bright, beloved children's classic about an insatiable caterpillar has been collecting awards—and fans—since it was first published in 1969. Here are a few things you might not know about The Very Hungry Caterpillar. 1. The Very Hungry Caterpillar's bright colors contrast a dark period in Eric Carle's childhood. Eric Carle was born in Syracuse, New York, on June 25, 1929. The author has since speculated that he was drawn to the chunky, vibrant colors of painted tissue paper collage in part as reaction to the grimness of his childhood. 2. Herr Kraus, Carle’s high school art teacher, recognized his young pupil’s potential and risked his livelihood for the opportunity to foster it. "I didn't have the slightest idea that something like that existed, because I was used to art being flag-waving, gun-toting Aryans—super-realistic Aryan farmers, the women with their brute arms,” Carle said. 3. The war didn't exactly endear Carle to Europe, and he longed to return to America. 4. 5.

Plot, Theme, the Narrative Arc, and Narrative Patterns In the world of fiction, just as in the world of your life, events occur. In life, people often try to determine what events mean in their own life and in the life of others. In fiction, authors will create meaning by introducing conflicts in the life of a character. The way a character responds to these conflicts is part of what gives a story meaning. Plot is not just what happens in a story. Similarly, the plot in a film is not just what happens. The pattern for narrative was largely handed down from the Greek tradition in drama. Exposition In section one of a narrative, viewers are exposed to information that will later be necessary for them to have if they are to understand the unfolding story. Characters: The lead character in the narrative — the character who faces the conflict — is called the protagonist. Rising Action In section two of the tale, the reader/viewer moves into the Rising Action of the story. In early literature, the conflicts were Man vs. Resolution

Daily Grammar Archive - Comprehensive archive of all of our grammar lessons and quizzes This archive contains links to all of our free grammar lessons and quizzes. You can use this archive to study Daily Grammar at your own pace. Lessons 1-90 cover the eight parts of speech, which are verbs, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections. Lessons 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 - Quiz Lessons 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 - Quiz Lessons 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 - Quiz Lessons 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Quiz Lessons 36, 37, 38, 39, 40 - Quiz Lessons 41, 42, 43, 44, 45 - Quiz Lessons 46, 47, 48, 49, 50 - Quiz Lessons 51, 52, 53, 54, 55 - Quiz Lessons 56, 57, 58, 59, 60 - Quiz Lessons 61, 62, 63, 64, 65 - Quiz Lessons 66, 67, 68, 69, 70 - Quiz Lessons 161, 162, 163, 164, 165 - Quiz Lessons 166, 167, 168, 169, 170 - Quiz Lessons 171, 172, 173, 174, 175 - Quiz Lessons 176, 177, 178, 179, 180 - Quiz Lessons 181, 182, 183, 184, 185 - Quiz Lessons 186, 187, 188, 189, 190 - Quiz

Teach students to write and answer inferencing questions. by kjames15 Jul 23

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